September 24, 2017
News Latest News | Poll Questions | Hurricane Maria | Orion Krause | Obamacare

Comments for: Feds decline to pursue study of Quimby national park proposal

Guidelines for posting on bangordailynews.com

The Bangor Daily News and the Bangor Publishing Co. encourage comments about stories, but you must follow our terms of service.

  1. Keep it civil and stay on topic
  2. No vulgarity, racial slurs, name-calling or personal attacks.
  3. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked.
The primary rule here is pretty simple: Treat others with the same respect you'd want for yourself. Here are some guidelines (see more):

  • Anonymous

    So much for the argument that the Obama administration was all gung-ho and full speed ahead on the idea of the national park.

    • Anonymous

      Yea, as we can believe them? They say they have no plans. Probably another approach to keep things quiet. In case the Liberals get Obama back in,.

    • Anonymous

      They don’t have money enough now to run the parks that they have now  .However, the grandeur of our national parks—and the character of our nation—is currently at stake as our parks have been subjected to a myriad of vexing problems. The National Park Service presently has a cumulative monetary shortfall of approximately $11.1 billion.[6] This shortfall, which has accumulated over the years, has arisen from a backlog of unfunded operations, construction projects, land acquisitions, and resource protection projects.[7] Because of this monetary shortfall, the Park Service is presently impoverished, mired in political squabbling, and beset with troubles from both within and without.

      Throughout the park system, the monetary shortfall has thwarted the Park Service’s ability to prevent the steady deterioration of roads, buildings, sewers, and other infrastructure.[8] Additionally, the park system has been forced to close campgrounds, shorten operating hours, eliminate many interpretive programs, and lay off many seasonal rangers.[9] The lack of funds has also hampered the Park Service’s ability to adequately care for its priceless natural, cultural, and historical assets.[10] Finally, the funding shortage has forced the Park Service to eliminate many of the parks’ scientific studies programs.[11]

      • Anonymous

        Maybe the short falls are coming form the 45% that does not pay taxes, but are yelling I want a National Park.

      • Anonymous

        Your post is full of logical and rational reasons for a halt on the creation of more National Parks and monuments. But, nevertheless, the present admin is presenting National Parks as “America’s Best Idea”.  So much for rational logic.  A better idea just might be to concentrate on efforts to make JOB CREATION  possible. 

        It’s a farce, at best, to promote traveling 2-300 miles to a wilderness park, with the catastrophic cost of gas for the average family. How is this “Best Idea” for anyone other than the ELITE … the ones who don’t need to be concerned with the cost of travel, shelter, food and healthcare?  

        The park concept, in this time of stressful economic conditions, is concocted BY the ELITE, …. FOR the ELITE.  This, while at the same time taking away the ability of the PEOPLE living in a park area to achieve any sense of pride and prosperity.  Selling trinkets, chambermaiding and waiting on tables doesn’t cut it.  The people of “means” will build the restaurants, resorts and boutiques … and they alone will reap any monetary benefits there may be … just like in Acadia.  That’s just the way it is.

      • Anonymous

        Yeah, that why we spent 2 million on new bathrooms at Acadia last summer. I have been to lots of parks and they are all very well kept and are quite nice. The “problems” you site are mostly all pie in the sky dreams that for the most part, we can do without. 
        Been to West Yellow Stone entrance to Old Faithful lately? West Yellowstone (the town) was once a thriving community. Since the Liberal Greens have moved in there over the past 20 years, they have all but closed this beautiful town. There are closed motels, eating establishments, and even the air strip, all because of the feel good greens. I have been there recently and have talked to the locals. It is just one example! 

        • Anonymous

          If you do a search like i did that’s were i got this info

    • Anonymous

      They do want it and are trying to dodge the controversy.  There are several “plan Bs” to keep working the agenda in stages.  Brownie Carson expected millions of acres under plans made by viros working inside the Baldacci administration without calling it a National Park.  These schemes have been fought for decades and still will be.

    • Anonymous

      Wait for the second term.

  • April Rainfrette

    Once in a great while, common sense emanates from Washington, DC.

    • Anonymous

      Watch out…this means they already have plans for Obama to use presidential powers to make it a national park with his name on it.

    • Anonymous

      Common sense has not emanated from Washington, DC; they had to react to it.

    • Anonymous

      Not Really.

  • Guest

    No support for a study “now”

    Obama, like Quimby must go,,,,, but not be replaced with Romney…!

  • Anonymous

    Just curious:  how much does Burt of Guilford actually make for his name and likeness scrawled across this Mass-hap’s packages?

    • Anonymous

       I believe Burt sold his shares once the company became moderately successful.

    • Anonymous

      He makes nothing these days, but his previous sales of stock (buyout) has left him well off, not that a person could tell by looking at him.

  • Anonymous

    What a dam surprise, and she is on the National Parks advisory Board.  
    Untill she resigns from the board this should not have been an issue, can you say conflict of interest

  • Anonymous

    i would think that they have more important issues to deal with in washington.

    • Anonymous

      There is nothing more important in Washington than getting more power.

  • Oh look the winey Nimbys have shut down Quimby. No need to do anything to bring business to Maine, we’ll just keep sucking the life out of the few that do work.

    • Anonymous

       That’s just it, we want the opportunity to recruit all kinds of industry without costly regulations, red tape, low wages and seasonal jobs.   Twenty five full time jobs is a joke. No need to become informed regarding the proposal, just keep firing misguided insults.

      • you ignore that something like this can bring upwards of tens of thousands of people to the state every year. Spending money renting rooms buying food, gas and whatever other neccessities they may have.

        • Anonymous

          That fanatasy has not been ignored.  Federal control for wilderness in place of a real productive economy has been rejected.

          • Anonymous

            But we do want the federal government to keep the federal mail sorting station in Hampden open so the federal employees can deliver the federal fuel assistance checks and the federal food stamps and the federal disability payments and the federal aid to dependent children to the jobless minions of the region, don’t we? But no federal park?

          • Anonymous

            Whatever you think about mail and welfare it does not justify your anti-industrial revolution trying to use the power of the Federal government to re-impose wilderness to pre-settlement conditions, abolishing industry, locally accountable government and private property rights.  You sound like Cynthia Dill.

  • Anonymous

    To quote nelson from the simpsons,   HAAA HAAA. 

    • Anonymous

      My thoughts exactly.

  • Anonymous

    hahahahahahahahahahahaha

  • Anonymous

    It doesn’t have this Mainer’s support.  Too much land is owned or controlled by the government at all levels.  If oil continues to be volatile -chemically, economically, and politically- than wood, pellets, and chips may be a very good investment for energy production.  If all the land is tied up in parks and reserves, there will not be the opportunity to have productive and sustainable forests that can create a living for people.  

    • Anonymous

      The productive and sustainable forests that can create a living for people exist in your dreams of the past.

      •  how long have you worked in forestry?

      • Anonymous

        The forest products industry is a major component of the Maine economy despite the attempts by the preservationist pressure group activists to kill it.

  • Anonymous

    A penny for Rep. Pingree’s thoughts on the subject….

    • Anonymous

      You won’t get your money’s worth!

    • Anonymous

       Pingreedy is PRO PARK,.. and as such,.. she stands no chance of advancing her political career, in Maine.

      • Anonymous

        Right. She’s our next Senator, ma’m.

        • Anonymous

          Has anyone else ever noticed the Red spot on the election maps in northern Penobscot County, 
          then wondered how come a town full of union people is like that ? 

          It kinda makes you ask if they understand politics at all, up that way,  don’t it just ? 

  • Anonymous

    Thank you Senator Collins for standing up for Maine, the Federal Government is in my pocket and life enough we don’t need them in our back yard also!!

    • Anonymous

      Thank you Senator Collins, for standing up for the forest products industry, who bought your election and reelection. Way to go.

  • Anonymous

    I bet RQ is outraged by this turn of events, but she shouldn’t worry.   I’m sure her “great deal” of supporters from Maine must vastly outnumber the anti park people and they will surely convince the legislature to jump on the RQ bandwagon……NOT!

  • Anonymous

    Smoke and mirrors. Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.

    Salazar says no RECONNAISSENCE study plans.

    Like all politicians and bureaucrats, it’s not what he says to be concerned about, but what he doesn’t say.

    The door is still open for a full scale $250,000 feasability study that would be financed by Quimby and various environazi groups.

     $1/4 mil is peanuts for these people.

     Just one Hollywood “expert” would pony up this amount of money.

     And there is still the threat of creating a National Monument designation straight from The One Himself, which is how George Dorr got around the local opposition to the great landgrab at Acadia back in the day.

     

    • Anonymous

      You are so right. The Queen Bee, to be sure, has already started PLAN B.

    • Anonymous

      Very true – I don’t think any of us think this is over yet by any stretch.  It’s still nice to hear the words though – we’ll continue the fight!
       http://preservemainetraditions.com/sign-petition/

    • Agreed, but it is just one more show of support for NO PARK, and one more hurdle for Roxy and her gang.  The key is that a feasability study would take YEARS to accomplish.

    • Anonymous

      She could do an independent study but she promised one in August that never materialized. That was one of the resons that the Evaluation committee disbanded. More in a long line of broken promises, deceptions and outright lies.

      • Anonymous

         It’s good to see the folks from Medway realizing what a fraud RQ is in relation to this national park boondoggle.

         Some times the aura of all that money outshines the light of truth.

        • James Leavitt

          your right, the folks of Medway was the only ones to figure that out.  The rest of the region wanted the park but Medway’s superior thought process and  leading ability stopped the park.  Congrats Medway, you are a real hero!!  NOT!  Just remember its the KATAHDIN REGION, not one town or one person.
           
          I do on the other hand agree with you that a National Park is a fraud to the taxpayers.

          • Anonymous

            “YOUR personal attacks directed at the people of the region is (sic.) not really necessary.”
             
            BUSTED, hypocrite.

          • James Leavitt

            really, you think thats an attack?  I guess I can read the sarcasm, while pointing out it wasn’t a town that stopped the park, it was a region.

    • Anonymous

      Just take the land by eminent domain build a road have it connecting to the proposed East-West Highway.  That would be useful as well.  That would make the Libs go nuts.

    • Anonymous

      The viros lobby has been using out of state money in collaboration with the National Park Service to do reconnaissance on private property in Maine for decades, lining up their propaganda.  The political purpose of a Salazar “study” has been to add an official endorsement of what they want in the guise of an objective “study”.

    • Anonymous

      The plan for a new national park in Maine can’t be killed. It’s alive and well and doing better than ever in spite of the attempts of the forest products industry to protect their clear cuts from the curious eyes of tourists and visitors.

      • poormaniac

        She could gather more support if she removed the rocks, boulders and barricades that prohibit the locals from recreating on these roads and on these brooks etc….As a disabled citizen I used to be able to fish and hunt on this land , now it is all but inaccessable to me and many others.  I think that’s no way to gain friends however she (RQ) will most likely use some of her cash to influence a politician such as Rep. Dill of North Boston in order to gain support for this park.

      • Anonymous

         Apparently you’re confused about what article you’re commenting on.

      • James Leavitt

        can you name an area of land or give the location of land that has been clear cut??  From my viewing of the Maine woods in the Katahdin Region is no clear cuts, they have select cut for certain products as the market demands not go in and cut every tree standing which would be represented by calling it a “clear cut”

      • Anonymous

        This failed radical agenda has been rejected for almost 25 years when it first began to be promoted, despite all the money, professional PR, and insider political connections that have been exploited to push it.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you Senator Collins!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Anonymous

      YES! She did a wonderful presentation!

    • Anonymous

      Thank you Senator Collins, for shoveling your misrepresentations of the majority of Maine citizens and attempting to bury a viable alternative for the region. You wouldn’t want to examine an alternative to the archaic thinking that has led to the sad state of affairs in the region, would you? Way too scary.

      • Anonymous

         That’s just it, the creation of a  park in an area that has no real unique and pristine characteristics for national park status is an archaic plan — a yesterday idea.

        Innovative and forward thinking individuals are already at the table, some developing strategic plans within the forest products industry, others marketing the region for tourism. You really underestimate the citizens and leaders in our state — that’s too bad, really.

        National Park not required. Plain and simple.

  • I wouldn’t be surprised if Quimby shuts ALL access of to her land…..then we will really hear people whining….

    • Anonymous

      And while I can’t stand the women, she has every right to do it and those who whine should just shut up!

      • Guest

        Let her shut it, who cares.. Now she has to start logging it, by law..

        • cite the law….

          • Anonymous

            The tree growth tax program is very broad in its definition of commercial use of the woods over long periods of time.

          • Anonymous

            Make it easy let everyone read it for themselves:

            Maine’s Tree Growth Tax program
            The Maine Tree Growth Tax law was established in 1972 “to help Maine landowners maintain their property as productive woodlands, and to broadly support Maine’s wood products industry.”7 Applicants to the program are required to produce a ten-year management plan and consult with a licensed forester. The law states:
            “Forest land” means land used primarily for growth of trees to be harvested for commercial use; may be either seedling, pole timber, or saw log stands. Forestland does not include ledge, marsh, open swamp, bog, water and similar areas that are unsuitable for growing a forest product or for harvesting for commercial use even though these areas may exist within forestlands.
            Under the law, commercial use is not limited to lumbering and can include such activities as the production of Christmas trees, maple syrup, nursery plantings and any other tree-derived product with commercial value. Every ten years the property is evaluated to ensure that the owner is following both his management plan and the law.

            Use – the land must be used primarily for the growth of trees to be harvested for commercial use. Owners must manage Tree Growth classified parcels according to accepted forestry practices designed to produce trees having commercial value.

          • Anonymous

            So do you want the State Treasurer to say something about this ? 

        • Anonymous

          She dont have to log it, she has to manage it as forest. She does that with  Sewall.

      • Maine Guy

        I still hunt on her land anyway, deer is plentiful there.  Catch me if you can

        • Anonymous

          Tsk Tsk Tsk.

           You naughty guy, you.

        • Anonymous

          Wow your cool!

        • Anonymous

          That’s called poaching,Maine Guy. You sound like an honorable fellow.

          • Anonymous

            So do fines for trespass go to State General fund or the County ? 

    • Anonymous

      If you really knew anything about it you would know all access is shut off !!

      • Anonymous

        Thats not 100% true ridgerunner, You can drive through much of her land now to go to Trout pond, Whetstone, Lunkasoos and Big Sebois. We will be lucky to have a place to put in to go fishing and fiddle heading this spring.

        • Anonymous

          She don’t own trout pond

          • Anonymous

            Didn’t say she did, but she owns allot of the land that leads to it, in both directions. And she is buying more all the time.

          • Anonymous

            Unless P/C or Katahdin paper sells to her she don’t own land to Trout pond going in from the west  !

          • Anonymous

            Sounds like a very small consolation prize you’ve got there ridge runner….

          • Anonymous

            So if this is all such  economically important  land to the  industry 
            how come she is able to buy it up from the commercial
            woods operators ?   

          • Anonymous

            And it will be illegal for her to shut down Whetstone bridge !!

          • but she owns the access and she can cut it off…you really don’t what you are talking about do you?

          • Anonymous

            Just like Elliotsville ………

        • sounds like theridgerunner doesn’t know what he is talking about….do your research before you comment….

          • Anonymous

            I can tell by your comments that you know what your talking about !  What a joke !

  • James Leavitt

    Seems how you are so smart and have all the answers please answers me this.  1.  Where does the funding come from to support a National Park.  2.  What are the requirements for a National Park such as; tar roads, distances from manufacturing and eye sores?  When you have been able to answer this you might understand that the cost of a National Park is a continuous expense to the U.S. Government and comes from your tax dollars.  Where does the “handouts” come from that you claim the area gets?  From your tax dollars!!!  With that said, you are upset that we don’t want something that will cost more tax dollars, shut down some of the ways of life, impact recreation which is the primary source of tourism.  In my opinion, i believe that if you put the money side by side, which one cost your more for taxes, you would see that running/starting a National Park would cost your more in the  first 10 yrs than the so called hand outs that were giving to the region over the past 10 yrs!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Anonymous

      Well there is already a park there, Make Baxter a National Park, will that now get the same people to flow in as roxy says will flow in when they turn 70k acres into a National Park with nothing to see in the 70k acres but trees and streams.  Surley a National Park will fix it.

      • Anonymous

         “nothing to see but trees and streams”.

        You can’t see the forest for the trees.

      • Anonymous

        ” Make Baxter a National Park …”

        THESE ( Great Northern woods ? ) PEOPLE HAVE NO RESPECT FOR PROPERTY RIGHTS AND DEEDS DO THEY ? 
        rotflol

    • Anonymous

      I’m not as concerned about the handouts that we’ve given over the past 10 years, as I am about the one’s we’re going to be giving out for the next 50.  Also – you are doing some highly questionable math, you don’t seem to have considered the cost of the toxic waste dump we just purchased for you, or the tax incentives that we offered the charcoal factory in exchange for your job.   You also seem to have missed the article in today’s paper that cites the enormous revenue stream that Acadia National Park generated for an otherwise unremarkable piece of Maine coastline.  Finally, your use of so many exclamation points makes you look a bit high strung (just friendly advice there).  Thanks.

      • James Leavitt

        President Obama just pushed for a 2.9 billion dollar budget for the National Park Service.  Do you really think we need to add to that number with another park which would be located next to a State park which to my knowledge is not support by federal tax dollars?  
        http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com/2011/02/updated-national-park-service-budget-would-grow-138-million-under-presidents-fy12-proposal7615
        What your forgetting is the main attraction for Acadia National Park is at the center, they have many coastal views and beaches so of course people visit the park for that reason.  What will be available for Quimby’s park will not offer anything that isn’t currently offered by Baxter Park.   In the situation proposed in the Katahdin Region, we are told to believe that we would also see 200 million spend in the area on the side attraction to the main attraction.  The main attraction in the area is Mt. Katahdin, i dont feel that there would be such an increase in tourist because of a wooded natural park over what is already hear which is Baxter Park.  Another aspect to consider is that you are basically wanting the area to put all its egg in the basket of a national park.  By doing so we would give up activities that already bring tourist to the area.  What has happened is all the eggs have been put into the mill situation and providing manufacturing opportunities.  I guess i disagree with your theory of going with a park over what we have always known.  Its easy for you to say what you want without being part of the situation.  Just remember, a national park cost you money, daily, weekly, monthly, yearly and that’s a fact.  The current situation may not cost you money in years your or I don’t know what the future brings.  The people of the area, we support not knowingly and willingly spending money on something not needed, rather spend on future prospects to keep an industry with living wages going.  

        • Anonymous

          I’m not sure why I’m bothering, but I guess I will.

          Before Acadia was a National Park, the Thunderhole attraction was a standard issue crevice not unlike dozens of others along the coast.  The addition of park loop road, bathrooms, shiny maps, handicapped parking, hotels, restaurants, guided boat rides, whale watches and bike rentals turned it into an attraction.  There are dozens of other tourists draws at that park that are similar – the visitors center draws millions of visitors and didn’t exist 100 years ago. Neither did the Carriage trails, the parking lot and road that makes it possible to get to Sand Beach, the hike around Jordan Pond or the restaurant there that sells tea and popovers for $15 to people from New Jersey all day long.

          Surely there were some short sighted locals at the time that Acadia was developed who complained that the only interesting thing about Acadia was a bunch of ocean and Cadillac Mountain.  I view your lack of foresight as being similar to that.  Millinocket is in a slow death spiral and it’s a drain on the State economy when it could be a contributor if it took the gift being offered.

          • Anonymous

             Wow — you’re way off on all counts on that one.

          • poormaniac

            As usual !

          • Anonymous

            Don’t bother!

          • Anonymous

            > exactly how many friends, family or associates do you know from the Katahdin Region???

            > Don’t bother!

            LOL

          • Anonymous

            Hey disqusbites, NO PARK FOR YOU!!!!!

          • James Leavitt

            You try because you actually think your right.  In your mind you have tried to compare the Maine coastal attractions to the woods of Maine.  There was no state park currently on MDI when the National Park was established.  To compare a situation that has a state park to one that doesn’t isn’t the way I would compare.  My point, being a resident that would be affected is that we already have a park which is visited by many.  To believe that an additional land that Quimby would donate actually increases the about of tourist is just something that the people of the area don’t see happening.  Your comment “Millinocket is in a slow death spiral and its a drain on the States economy when it could be a contributor if it took the gift being offered”  shows your mentality on the situation.  Its a region who is refusing the National Park, not one community.  It is a region who is getting help from the State to provide jobs to the area not one community.  

          • Anonymous

            They got away with Acadia because it was a sneak attack.   The Trust and its leader Dorr had no intention of giving land to the Federal government.  It occurred to them when they were afraid of losing their state charter over the controversy of the local revolt by people tired of being pushed around.  Dorr went to Washington in secret and arranged for National Monument by presidential decree before there was a National Park Service and without the people knowing what they had to fight.  It wasn’t a “gift”, it was a means for maintaining control through the Federal government unaccountable to the local people.  It also had nothing to do with a “thunderhole attraction”; the Trust wanted the land preserved around the mansions for their own benefit.

          • Anonymous

            Does this guy vote? I hope not!!

          • Anonymous

            The viros have told us very loudly they don’t want to allow representative self-government in the UT.  They are hysterical over the prospect of losing some of the dictatorial control through LURC.  A BDN editorial has even denounced local self government accountable to local people as “pandering to voters”.  Only the arrogant political elite has access to the “right ideas”, from which it must rule.  That is why they want Federal control for rule by Washington, DC dictatorial bureaucracy.  These little tyrants are right of 1930s European national socialism and fascism.

          • Anonymous

            That now is as silly an argument as I have ever heard. 

          • Anonymous

             Try comparing apples to apples, it makes for a stronger argument. You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.

          • Anonymous

            Well, I think you need to start considering  Ms. Quimby options. 
            You need to think about how see like your apples. Will she deed the development rights and management to PETA, post it all, prosecute trespassers and  put gates on the roads and snow machine trails letting them grow over  ?  

          • Anonymous

            The carriage trail system, and most of the access was developed by the Rockefeller family before the land was given to the Federal Governmant. Quote from NP website: “Acadia National Park’s carriage road system, built by John D. Rockefeller Jr., has been called “the finest example of broken stone roads designed for horse-drawn vehicles still extant in America.” Today, you can hike or bike 45 miles of these scenic carriage roads in the park.
            As far as the trail network goes, here is another quote from the Park website “Acadia National Park contains more than 120 miles of historic hiking trails. Many of these trails were established by local village improvement societies in the late 1800s and early 1900s.:Also, according to the latest census, the median household income in Bar Harbor is $31,024. In Maine it’s $45,734. So even though the park draws a lot of visitors, no one is getting very rich .So under what premise to you use to justify a new park in the remote part of the state is going to be an economic boon? Go do some more homework Bangorian.

          • Anonymous

            There is more revealing history: the Rockefellers were opposed to roads and “horseless carriages”.  They wanted the traditional carriage roads for their own benefit near the mansions.  After building them Rockefeller turned that part of the land over to the Federal government as a means of keeping them under control forever, with roads for “horseless carriages” forbidden.  The great fire that burned them out in the 1940s put an end to the idea that there should be no roads.

          • Anonymous

            First he build them, as much to make jobs for the Islanders during the 1880’s depression as anything else. They had a good relationship with the Islanders.  

            Then having brought it up you might beware of conditions that Ms. Quimby might place on the deeds to her lands.

            But I support your right to be the short sight company men and rustic hillbillies at the end of  the Appalachian Trail, clinging to a century that has gone by.

          • Anonymous

            The carriage trails were not built to “supply jobs”, nor were they built in the “1880s depression”.  They were built up until about 1940 because the Rockefellers didn’t want modern “horseless carriages” around their mansions.  They were clinging to a “century gone by”.

            The land trust led by George Dorr for the mansion owners was so unpopular for using arm twisting and pressure tactics, including state eminent domain authority, that they were afraid of losing their charter.  That is why Dorr went to Washington DC to secretly arrange for a Federal takeover that later became Acadia National Park.  It was first made into a National Monument under presidential decree, bypassing local people and Congress alike.

            The Story of Acadia National Park, an autobiographical account by Dorr in an intended favorable account of himself nevertheless reveals quite a bit.  The publisher described it (1985 edition, back cover) as “a forest of political intrigues, favors called in, land speculation, the rebellion of the ‘locals’, and the unlimited use of reputations, power and money”. Dorr’s campaign took him “into the parlors and dining rooms of America’s elite, through the halls of Congress, and finally right into the Oval Office itself.” 

            Dorr openly acknowledged that the intent had never been for the wealthy backers of the land trust to give up the land.  They hadn’t even thought of it until a revolt of local citizens after years of being pushed around. Dorr and his cronies turned to the Federal government to take control on their behalf because they were afraid of losing their charter in Maine; they were not interested in “supplying jobs”.

            Eminent domain is used by the National Park Service to control landowners and force them to sell their land.  Quimby boasts that she is buying land at Acadia as part of her intended 2016 100th anniversary “gift” to the National Park Service.  An a wealthy insider in the National Park Service political elite she is buying land from people under the threat of eminent domain if they try to use their land and can’t sell to anyone else.

            This whole scheme by wealthy insiders to get the National Park Service to take over millions of acres of private property in Maine so they can control it for their fanatical wilderness agenda is a lapse into the century old history of abuse by the National Park Service.

            One of the earliest examples of demeaning and brutalizing “hillbillies” was the mass condemnation and removal of the “mountain people” for the Smoky Mountains and Shenandoah in the southeast in the 1930s.  Many of them were removed to psychiatric asylums for experimenting and imprisonment under the eugenics policies of the progressives of that era.  The “rural cleansing” agenda of the viro activists in Maine has deep roots and in a century of abuse by the wealthy political elite that no one wants to be taken back to.

          • Anonymous

            It might be more accurate to look at household income in all the towns on Mt. Desert, as well as Ellsworth and Tremont, not just the town of Bar Harbor. 

          • James Leavitt

            agreed! I lived in Northeast Harbor for a year. From my opinion it would appear that the Northeast Harbor and Seal Harbor area is where the seasonal residents live with the higher incomes. I have gone to Southwest, Tremont, Bass Harbor area and that seemed to be more of locals. I guess what im trying to say is you cant take one spot and base the opinion. You have to look at all towns within a distance and see the household income. Just like with the park deal, you cant just look at Millinocket without considering other areas, Patten, Sherman, Benedicta, Medway, East, Stacyville.

          • Anonymous
          • Anonymous

            Like one restaurant is going to make any kind of economic impact on the area as a whole. And who gets to reap the benefits of the $15. popover? Certainly isn’t the help. They are mostly college age people getting through college. I know because I am one of those that just happens not to live in New Jersey that buys a 15.00 popover. BTW, they don’t cost $15.00. A bowl of soup and a popover will run you $9.25. Go do your homework.

          • Anonymous

              Why do so many of you locals always assume that you are going to be the dishwashers? 

          • Anonymous

            Years of down trodden, menial and unproductive jobs have permanently damaged the self image of the local folks here. 

          • James Leavitt

            exactly how many friends, family or associates do you know from the Katahdin Region???  

          • Anonymous

            That might be true and compounded by the damage done from living in stench of the paper mills.

             It is rumored that they honestly don’t know that their towns stink. 

            Can you imagine the other possible side effects,
            if that is as common a  self delusion as it is purported to be in the Region ?

          • James Leavitt

            You seem to speak as if you have a wealth of knowledge of the people of the Katahdin Region.  You can call us names, state things that is opinionated, talk your smack.  Again my question to you, how many friends family or associates do you have from the area?  I’m willing to bet from your comments you haven’t gotten to know the people from the area, rather go on you quality report by Nick who’s credibility in the area isn’t top notch.  

          • Anonymous

            I worked in the paper plantation. 
            I learned bettah, fast. So yup, I know ya well enough to be just like you can be. It is all you understand, anyway. 

          • Anonymous

            Given their PR skills, it might be just the case for the No Park  Pacs … 
            (or is it spelled “packs” … if you are referring to them by their insulated rubber boots ?)  

          • Anonymous


            BTW, they don’t cost $15.00. A bowl of soup and a popover will run you $9.25. Go do your homework. ” 

            The No Park PAC have nothing if they can’t tell lies, do they ? 

          • poormaniac

            Please try to remember also that Acadia was developed by an individual with his own hard earned money .   The roads and some buildings and other infrastructure was in place way before this was donated to the US government.  Perhaps Roxanne should develop this park herself before asking the taxpayers to foot the bill.  I don’t think this will happen because I believe that this chunk of land is a small part of a larger plan , much larger than  Quimby can afford.

          • Anonymous

            She’ll start by posting it all. 

          • poormaniac

            In fact she’s done that by placing large boulders on road entrances , removing bridges etc…..

          • Anonymous

            Acadia was not created or developed by a single individual with his hard earned money, and it is a myth that it was “donated” as a “gift to the people”.  It was assembled by a land trust on behalf of the mansion owners who wanted the land around them preserved and transferred to the Federal government as a means to keep control of it on their behalf when they were faced by a revolt from local people.   The trust was, however, led by a single individual, George Dorr, who made it his avocation, but it wasn’t done with his “hard earned wealth”.  See the comment on this below on this page at http://bangordailynews.com/2012/02/29/news/feds-decline-to-pursue-study-of-quimby-national-park-proposal/#comment-453988144

            You are right that Quimby’s land is a small part of a larger plan involving millions of acres of other people’s property that Quimby does not have the means to acquire herself. She has said that her land is intended as a “seed” to get the power of the Federal government into the area and expand.

          • me in me

            Millinocket ? You can’t get there from here! Acadia has the luxury of being close to people!

          • James Leavitt

            definiantly not going to have the summer residents on the Island with there boats pulling up to Millinocket.  

        • Anonymous

          Baxter State Park is certainly a great attraction, but it is run under much more stringent (Forever Wild) rules than a national park would be. Access is quite limited at Baxter, which excludes any motorized recreation. Also, the number of campsites is quite limited. 
          The situation might be seen as similar to northern Minnesota, where the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) is adjacent to Voyager National Park. People who want motorboats, motor homes, and developed campsites go to Voyager. Those who want a non-mechanized experience go to the BWCA, which is quite primitive. It seems to work out pretty well, and the BWCA is a world-wide draw, while the Minnesota iron mines and forestry have declined.

          • James Leavitt

            Stephen, there are areas of Baxter Park that you can use recreational vehicles.  I have been up in the park snowmobiling.  Also some area within the park that are open to hunting.  As it is not a huge portion its is not totally closed down.

          • Anonymous

            I know that Baxter isn’t completely restricted, but it’s more restricted than a national park would be. Just as the BWCA is more restricted than the adjacent Voyager park. I don’t think of hunting as being a “motorized” activity, per se. Although the lack of motors does sometimes have an effect on which deer you choose to shoot. They get heavy pretty quick.

          • James Leavitt

            i agree, i just didn’t know if you were aware of the usage

          • Anonymous

            The destruction of industry has not worked out well for those who relied on it and can’t replace what they had with low level tourist jobs, and it has not worked out well for the landowners subjected to eminent domain.

        • Anonymous

          Please, the paper companies have provided no security whatsoever. Talk about greed, they are number 1. 
          We can have both, given that Baxter State Park, has survived all the air quality standards since its inception. There is no logic in what you are saying., 

      • Anonymous

         I guess I didn’t realize that Cadillac mountain and thunderhole were unremarkable pieces of Maine coastline.  You’re right – they certainly don’t compare to a liquidation harvested clear cut with blackflies.  You’ve changed my mind!  Sign me up for a camping spot on the stumps!

      • Anonymous

        What are you talking about? Who are you, the State treasurer?

        • Anonymous

          “Legend in His Own Mind”

      • Maine Guy

        Sorry Bangorian, you have NO say one what money gets spent where.  You lost your park, the government is spending your tax money without your say so, this is eating you up, and we love it.

        • Anonymous

           Actually – the park isn’t “lost”.  Quimby still owns it.  In case you haven’t noticed, the Katahdin region hits the skids about every 18 months.  This is just a waiting game.

          • Anonymous

            Just like Bob Myers said: Ms. Quimby will be the one to decide when it’s over. And she doesn’t appear to be a quitter or a loser.

          • Anonymous

            She doesn’t recognize that she’s a loser.

          • Maine Guy

            She just lost

          • Anonymous

            Don’t count on it.

          • Anonymous

            Wish it were so.This is only strike one..

          • Anonymous

            Correction she is a LOSER !!

          • Anonymous

            Notice the cynical admission of this power-seeker: “a waiting game” until they can come back and ram it down the throats of the people.  This has been their strategy since they were first rejected in their big promotion of the late 1980s, with several assaults since then.  It’s why Restore was hatched as offshoot of the Wilderness Society by Kellet and St. Pierre to keep failed campaign alive when the viros had to stop throwing money into a full-force campaign that had been thoroughly rejected.  It’s why they are worse than stalkers.

          • Anonymous

            You never got out of the skids..:)

          • Anonymous

            Well now it looks like you’re going to get to enjoy this “waiting game” for a very long time, and probably forever!  :)

          • Anonymous

            Unlikely. The region is depopulating itself due to lack of opportunities.  The coffee brandy sales are great, though!

          • James Leavitt

            I don’t dispute the lack of opportunities in the area.  The opportunity that is going right now is the mills and whatever plans Cate St has planned.  By shutting them out, going with a national park would not send a good message to any possible employer looking to begin a business in this area.  I feel its just more complicated than starting a national park.  People who dont live in the region affected dont realize the affect it will have.  I respect your opinion but its not as cut and dry as the region not wanting economic development, its the balance of economic development without losing what we already have.  The region has worked hard to have good snowmobile systems, now ATV trail system all which could be affected by a national park.  From my perspective its not the fact that she wants a park, its what it represents and who pays for it.  If she would donate her land to Baxter State Park, have it run as a bigger state park, governed under the rules of Baxter State Park, I feel she wouldn’t have nearly as hard of a time getting things through.  Im not opposed to her land be donated and used, what i have the problem with is having a national park, run by an association which is millions of dollars in debt.  

          • Anonymous

            I also don’t pretend to understand why R. Quimby wants a national, as opposed to state, park. For that matter, she could give the land to a non-profit organization like the Sierra Club that could  take it off the tax rolls, and run it even more restrictively than Baxter. 

          • Anonymous

            The viros idolize the power of the National Park Service as the ultimate permanent control on behalf of their ideology.  Quimby wants NPS controlling the land on her behalf from the grave forever.

          • Anonymous

            This is what is happening in the Maine Woods. 

            Hunting supports 4,000 jobs and generates $217 million in retail sales and $81.4 million in salaries and wages.
            ◊ Snowmobiling supports 3,600 jobs and generates $273 million in snowmobile-related expenditures and over $400 million in total economic impact. 

            Forestry industry:  The economic impact of timber harvesting, production, and manufacturing on Maine’s economy is substantial. In 2010, forestry and logging employed 2,460 people with wages of $94.8 million.  In 2009, forestry-related manufacturing, which accounts for 26 percent of the value of all manufacturing in the state, contributed well over $2 billion to Maine’s economy and employed nearly 13,000 people in the state. The conservation of working forestland helps to safeguard these jobs.http://cloud.tpl.org/pubs/local-maine-conseconomics-2012.pdf 

          • me in me

            you and (ban)gorian should set up housekeeping  . You would be very  unhappy together.

          • me in me

            She still owns the land -Which is NOT a park.

      • Anonymous

        Grow up!

      • Guest

        I can tell you, Bangorian, that Millinocket is the least of our worries, you should have the same concerns for Bangor….that is a big black hole of entitlement programs and drugs…

        •  As a bangor resident I agree with you 100%.

        • Anonymous

          Bangorian is a member of  the “Quimby & Co.”  ideology.  Quimby provides free housing for artists from NYC and beyond, in Portland, Maine.  She also has remote cabins in the Maine Woods for the same purpose, while she has kicked out camp owners on leased land in the Maine Woods, and burned their generations old properties into the ground.  Portland scrambles to find housing for 7000 homeless within the span of any given year, recently. 
          In 2011, the City of Portland spent 6,220,000 (AFTER gov. reimbursements) on general assistance, up nearly 1 million from 2010.  These things go unnoticed by the extremists who know a “better way” for the environment.  PEOPLE of “less culture” are of no significant value or concern.   Their traditions, their lives and their thoughts are ridiculed, while the wealthy elite and their wannabee followers spew “save the earth”, to heck with the PEOPLE.

          • James Leavitt

            People from the Portland/Lewiston are being relocated to Millinocket* for the cheaper cost of living while still on State programs.  From this the increase of people using state programs in the Katahdin Region does come from the “locals” who were born, raised and worked here.  Its not the locals of the area who are a drain on the state, its the same people who have been a drain on the state now live in Millinocket* because the state can house them for half the cost of in Portland or Lewiston areas.
            *Correction* I shouldn’t of labeled the area as Millinocket. As i have previously stated elsewhere, its is the Katahdin Region, not individual town or person.

          • Anonymous

            It is pollution from the mills that is a drain on the State, 
            that and the corporate welfare wasted on reopening then every few years, too. 

          • Anonymous

            I can understand your need to cast stones  given 
            the short, sad, corporatist  history of  Millinocket; http://region.katahdincommons.com/index.php?title=Millinocket_history So aren’t the workers in a “padone” labor system properly called “peons” ? 
            Read the history of how the mill were build, 

          • James Leavitt

            Are you serious??  You just tried to use wikipedia as a credible source?  All i can do is laugh and totally disregard anything you have said previously.  Do you even realize that wikipedia is so opinionated over factual that it is forbidden by every college professor i have had for information used in reporting.  

          • Anonymous

            Are you questioning the sourse or the facts ? 

            Not that it matters much as you are still wrong, as usual,  on both counts. 

            “Katahdin Regional Wiki

            Welcome to the Katahdin Regional Wiki, a community effort to bring you the most accurate, up-to-date, and comprehensive information about the beautiful area in which we live,… “

        • Anonymous

          Ahyup, and  your trying to live in past century while fighting progress 
          for the whole Penobscot Valley, not to mention the State of Maine,
           is not going unnoticed. 

          Your towns and town’s people ways are becoming known to be just bad business for the rest of Maine’s citizens. 

          Look at the record.

          • Anonymous

            You are a Quimby pawn. Tree hugger, an educated armchair expert

      • Anonymous

        Really? I don’t think he used that many exclamation points!!!!

      • Anonymous

        “otherwise unremarkable piece of Maine coastline” LOL, your foolish comments make you look, well, foolish (just friendly advice there). But I suppose the silver lining is that it allows readers to see just how far you are willing to stretch the truth to make your point, so they can apply that insight to your political statements too. 

        You obviously need to get out of Bangor and actually go down and see Acadia for yourself if you think it’s unremarkable!  Yes there are many beautiful areas along the Maine coast, but there’s a very good reason why Acadia was chosen, by people who could afford to buy property anywhere, for their summer residences and eventually for the park.  The first explorers of the Maine coast noted it and remarked on how spectacularly beautiful it was and ever since then people have traveled to experience it for themselves. Nowhere along the whole eastern seaboard will you find mountains rising up so close to the sea.  This provides a dramatic and quite remarkable perspective whether you’re along the rugged coastline with the mountains as a backdrop, or atop one of the mountains which afford you incredible views in every direction. I’ve been around Acadia my whole life and this is the very first time I’ve heard anyone try to categorize it as “unremarkable!”  I’m a hunter and outdoorsman and hiker and a snowmobiler and thoroughly enjoy spending time deep in the Maine woods, but there’s absolutely nothing about Quimby’s plot of forestland that compares to the spectacular beauty of Acadia, and that will still be true whether it continues under private ownership or under government control.

      • me in me

        You have to go thru an awful lot of unremarkable Maine to get to the proposed North Park area. I think people would lose interest in visiting the park around Bangor.(to most people not from Maine , Bangor IS northern Maine!)

    • Anonymous

      You sound like someone who is cutting off their own hand and claiming that you don’t want any help, because you’re against it, on principle.

      • Anonymous

        Federal control for wilderness is not “help”.

    • Anonymous

      But, but the Bates motel…

    • Anonymous

      Does that include the cost of buying and operating the Dolby landfill? I’d much rather have a toxic waste site than a park. A dump to show our children and grandchildren. A dump to remind us of the glory days of our exploitation and subsequent abandonment. Right………

      • poormaniac

        The fact remains that the landfill is there and has to be dealt with .  The parent company ,GNP, years ago established this and it has finally been passed off to the state.  This is a shining example of politics in action , let the next guy deal with it.

    • Anonymous

      they just print $ relax it will be there.

  • YYYYYEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!   Hey Roxy, I’ll give you $.10 on the dollar for your useless land.  Then I’ll give it BACK to the people of Maine.

    • Anonymous

      We can buy the land and give to the paper companies or sell it to a developer have them build a Casino,  a car racing track and a shopping mall.  Something to draw people to that part of the state which could use the  jobs and growth.  That would draw than some stupid park which will draw noone.

      • I would just rather have used for what it’s always been used for, at least until Roxy got her useless hands on it.

    • Anonymous

      It never belonged to the people of Maine. It belonged to the Native Americans who were here a long before before you were. The lumber barons stole it from the natives, and the ensuing population were lulled into passivity with cheap lease lots and relaxed trespass laws while the forests around them were decimated by multi national corporations. And when all that was left were toothpicks instead of forests, forests so ravaged that even a herd of deer had no place to winter, you applied for your fuel assistance and food stamps so you could live out your life in ignorant bliss, spouting off myopic rhetoric.

      • poormaniac

        At first it was taken over by the British to build their tall ships but now it seems the French ( American Loggers) are benefitting from it. Give it back to the natives !

        • James Leavitt

          Hey news flash, the “American Loggers” were born and raised here.  How about you complain about Irving or other companies that reside in Canada, cross the border and cut the wood in the State of Maine.  Another catch 22, get rid of the French Logging companies in Maine and you put a load of people out of work who goes to the state for help.  Great theory!

          • poormaniac

            I know where the boy’s weer born , can’t help it if Maine north of Bangor isn’t part of Canada.

      • Anonymous

        It was not America when the Natives had all the land, so that term should be Natives, not Native Americans.  Too much dam PC.  

      •  oh your a wildlife biologist too?!

      • Unless the Indians of Maine lived in trees, I highly doubt much of the land in discussion here was Indian land, yes Indian.  And last time I checked, the lumber companies allowed access to it for people to use, so it DID in fact belong to the people of Maine.  Now Roxy won’t let anyone on it.  And don’t tell ME I applied for assistance, I actually work for a living to support people like you who expect the government to fend for them.  So here is your crying towel-I believe pink was your choice of color.

        • Anonymous

          The fact that a private landowner allows some degree of access to his land does not mean that the land “DID in fact belong to the people of Maine.” At any moment that the landowner decides to shut the gate and lock it, access is cut off, entirely legally. The land in question, in fact, belongs to the entity that holds title to it. That may be some LLP, or Roxanne Quimby, or Plum Creek. In any case, they bought it, they own it, and unless access has been granted to the public, nobody but the owner has the right to be on the land. Just like your back yard, or my back yard. 

          • Well thank you for the legal lesson of the day, but I think I already knew that.  However, since you can’t read between the lines, let me help you.  Although it did indeed belong to a certain “entity,” let’s say, the huge majority of those entities allowed access.  From Plum Creek, to CMP, to Bangor Hydro, etc.  Since Maine has an access law, unless that land is posted, it is useable.  Land in the middle of nowhere, is not the same as your, or my, backyard.  So in “essance” it belonged to the people.  Legally no, figuratively yes.

          • Anonymous

            The only question I’d have about that is this. The big landowners could save a lot of taxes by deeding the recreational easements to their land to the government, or a non-profit. They’d still be able to use the land for forestry, and it wouldn’t change their cash receipts at all. But they don’t do this. Ever wonder why, if they intend for the land to be available for public use for the long term? 
            Ever notice that Maine has the largest percentage of out-of-state ownership of its land in the country? And one of the highest percentages of corporate ownership?
            There was a time when paper companies owned large plantations of tree growth to supply their mills. Even large paper users, like the New York Times, owned tree growth land. Not so much, now. In 2004 International Paper sold six million acres of tree growth in the U.S. Blandin Paper, a big Minnesota-Wisconsin-Michigan paper company, started selling its land in the early 1950’s, and then the entire company was sold to a Finnish conglomerate.
            The point being that land ownership in the Maine North Woods is concentrated and corporate, and it is in flux.
            The largest real estate development in the history of Maine is on land that belongs to Plum Creek. That land used to be tree growth, owned by Scott, then S.D. Warren, then SAPPI, then Plum Creek, soon to be hundreds of private owners of vacation houses. I wonder how much of that land will continue to be open to the public. 
            An interesting thing about ownership of the piece of land is that each succeeding owner, from Scott to Plum Creek, owned it for a shorter period of time. That seems to be a general pattern in the the rest of the Maine forest, and in corporations in general. We’re in an era when multi-national corporations buy and dismantle other corporations continually, spinning off unwanted properties to the highest bidder. 
            As long as a paper company owns both the acreage and the paper mill, it’s likely that the owner will try to stay on good terms with the locals. They need tax breaks, government services, subsidies, etc, and one way to get those things is to keep the locals happy. 
            That’s a lot less true for a land owner that’s just a transient speculator. 

          • Your point is well taken.  I think your point about ownership being shorter and shorter has all to do with companies turning hands so frequently these days.  Along with that change of company ownership, comes the change of land ownership.  Roxanne Quimby could have won the hearts of every Mainer by buying that land, and giving it back to us so the corporations wouldn’t take it, or give it, away.  Instead she became selfish with it, and alienated almost every one she came in contact with.  It is truly unfortunate that it had to be that way.

          • Anonymous

            You are right that prior permission for use does not mean collective ownership for such a use, but there is more to it in the case of Quimby:  One can understand a person revoking permission to use his land when he
            wants to use it for something himself after buying it, Quimby is buying
            tens of thousands of acres for the purpose of non-use on principle.  Quimby still has a right to control the use of her land the way she wants as the owner, but her stated goals are to eliminate on principle human use and private property rights forever.  Acknowledging her right to control her own property does not mean acquiescing to her political goals or refraining from denouncing her for her misanthropic wilderness ideology.

        • Anonymous

          You should have treated her bettah. 
          It is her land, so why she should let people like you run wild on it ? 

          • Should have treated who bettah?  The big ugly witch from hell.

          • Anonymous

            My point has been made. 
            Thank you. 

          • Well I guess since the Feds have declined to pursue her Park, I guess she should have treated us, the feds, Augusta, our reps in Washington, and anyone else involved, BETTAH!

          • Anonymous

            Quimby started buying up as much land as she could get her hands on to prevent human use and put it under  Federal wilderness control long before anyone had a chance to “treat her” in any way.

      • Anonymous

        Another interesting point. 

        So what is the Penobscot Nation’s position on seeing at least a bit of Maine returned to its natural state ?

        • Anonymous

          I do know the Passamaquoddy  Tribal Representative Madonna Soctomah voted against the National Park in the North Maine woods !

          • Anonymous

            The Passamaquoddys also strongly opposed the whole Greenline Park agenda when it was first promoted twenty years ago.  They know that this is about the viros using the Federal government to steal land and impose restrictions, not “lumber barons”.

          • Anonymous

            (Edited by author 3 hours ago)
            HAHAHA….I see someone didn’t like that !! 

          • Anonymous

            The facts allways get them

          • Anonymous

            So the question still stands unanswered, as is  usual with you people. 

            “So what is the Penobscot Nation’s position on seeing at least a bit of Maine returned to its natural state ?” 

            They might feel differently about how you have treated the River, 
            or do you folks think all them people are the same, anyway ? 

            It IS pretty your only point, isn’t it ? 

  • I am curious what your favorite color is? I would like to purchase you a crying towel.

    • Anonymous

       My least favorite color is pink – the color of the slips that the mill hands out every 6 -8 months.

      • Pink it is then.  Maybe after your done crying in it enough it will turn red, which is what you will be seeing as Roxy’s 70,000 sits there useless.

      • James Leavitt

        Really??  Maybe since you moved to Maine with your radical ideas, probably for the same reason most do (easy to get state support).  Look the mills ran for what a 100 years before it shut down?  Yes in the past 10 – 15 years the industry has taken a hit.  Before you accuse a business with handing out pink slips every 6 – 8 months you might want to looking into HISTORY!!!  History will show you that the original GNP mismanaged money and stocks, this led to a turnover in which a competitor ran the mills down to bring theirs on top.  Sold it off to another company who came in and finished the job by stealing money from the workers and making changes that eventually made the mill unable to compete with others world wide.  Yes it has been a continuous process but this time we have a company investing into the mills not taking things out so that it will no longer run.  Im sure you never got that information as you wouldn’t believe the truth.

  • The reason why Salazar is dropping this plan is easy. There’s a Freedom of Information Act suit on file that requires the Interior Dept to disclose ALL document’s relating to this mess. Salazar has said, for the record, that he had no contact with RQ or any of her people regarding this proposed Park. If any document’s are found that contradict Salazar then he’s in violation of the Act as well as subject to investigation for Making False Official Statement’s. Add the potential conflict of interest into this mix and can we all say ‘Iran-Contra’? Salazar’s gonna be’ if he’s found in any way attached to this mess, hung from the tallest tree by his ‘Buster Brown’s’ and made the current Administration’s pin~ata. With the BP-Gulf already on his record, Salazar can ill afford another trial by fire.

    • Anonymous

      The National Park Service has a record of hiding documents it doesn’t want released under the Freedom of Information Act.  For example I found them denying the existence of embarrassing documents that I knew they had because portions had already leaked out.  There isn’t much that ordinary people can do to counter an agency with that kind of power.   That is why it is best to keep them out of Maine.

      • Agreed. I know the current Park Police Chief in DC and saw what she had to go thru when the DOI tired to hide, with both a FOIA and a Federal Judge’s Court Order in effect, her Performance Review’s that DOI claimed showed she was incompetent. DOI, courtesy of any number of Bush 2 appointee’s, tried to get her not just fired but blackballed when she answered a reporter’s question that she had to under Federal Law. What’s worse is that Bush made it A FIRING OFFENSE TO KNOWINGLY LIE TO THE PUBLIC IN THE COURSE OF THE EMPLOYEE’S DUTIES. She answered and she immediately got ‘the boot’. When she fought back, it took over 8 for her to get back to where she had started. Along the way she found that the entire NPS Staff was involved in this mass lynching, right up to the Secretary of The Interior, Gale Norton. When she got caught with her signature on the orders to hide Chief Chamber’s Review’s, she ran !! And I mean like a scalded dog. Gail Norton resigned in less than 6 hours and hasn’t been seen in DC since. Gee, can anyone guess why ?

        DOI has a seriously bad habit, and now it’s on the record, of lying and trying to hide fact’s and document’s from the public, even when order by the Court’s to disclose. Is it a wonder why Salazar backed away from this so fast and publicly ? The Park Police Chief’s case set a lot of precedent’s and showed The Court’s exactly where to go looking when their Court Order’s to the DOI are ignored or outright refused. Salazar, and you can bet that the AG with the Fast and Furious mess on his hands, is not about to sticking his head into that ’empty doghouse’ just to see if it’s really empty. As much as people complain about ‘activist Judge’s’, there are any number of Judge’s, and I can think of 1 sitting in Northern Virginia right now, who would love to get a hold of a FOIA case with the Interior Dept. under the gun. ‘The Wheel’, when it comes around, doesn’t really cae who gets in the way. ‘The Wheel’ has a way of coming around regardless of who’s there when it does. And anyone that’s seen it happen can tell you the truth of it, can’t they ?

        • Anonymous

          Dems do not resgin when they get caught, they get reelected, as Mr Wrangle.

          • What can you say ? It’s New York. Go figure.

          • Anonymous

            He was one of a few that were caught, I do remember some Reps that got caught, and poof they were gone, One dem got caught with 80k of a 100k bribe to vote a one way, he did not step down, the people finally voted him out.  One Rep sent sexual notes or texts to an inter(s), and he steped down, I see a pattern here.

        • Anonymous

          A lot of people have seen it first hand, but it isn’t widely known nearly enough.  NPS is a corrupt bureaucracy hiding behind the scenic props used to promote a false reputation.  My personal experiences with the corruption of NPS, including FOIA, started with the Bush-1 administration when Ridenour was NPS Director.  It goes back a lot farther than that and hasn’t stopped.

          Another scandal with many tentacles related to Maine was the park police catching Robert Binnewies, Superintendent at Yosemite, illegally bugging (recording) a property owner whose land he wanted.  Binnewies had been chief ranger at Acadia when Peggy Rockefeller hired him to start the Maine Coast Heritage Trust to get private property under NPS control — He was Executive Director from 1970-75 before his Rockefeller connections got him a position as VP of Audubon, then was moved directly into the prestigious Superintendent position at Yosemite, bypassing working his way up.  After he was fired for the illegal bugging (during the Reagan Administration) at Yosemite, he was moved directly to Executive Director of the Palisades Interstate Park
          Commission in NY and NJ, another big preservation agency under
          Rockefeller influence. Rockefeller money has a long, notorious history of undue influence over NPS and other such agencies, including in Maine. 

          Maine Coast Heritage Trust was later caught collaborating with NPS to plan for taking over most of Washington County.  MCHT (and The Nature Conservancy) beginning in the 1980s secretly and illegally reconnaissanced private property without telling the property owners under the NPS National Natural Landmark Program.  Sen. Mitchell eventually shut the Landmarks program down under a moratorium when the Interior Inspector General found it violating the civil rights of landowners across the country.  That investigation started from complaints from Maine about NPS and MCHT. 

          MCHT, not surprisingly, was sited as one of the sources in the the 1988 NPCA National Park System Plan in Washington DC that started the big promotion targeting millions of acres of private property in Maine to be taken over for National Parks.  This did not start with Quimby, and neither did the scandals.

          • Anonymous

            You ought to write for Law and Order, Special Victems Unit. You have an active fantasy life,

          • Anonymous

            Your sneering smears are non-responsive.  The dronington knows nothing about this topic or is trying to create a distraction through personal invective to prevent others from knowing it, or both.

    • Anonymous

      They could catch him in the same room as Ms Q, and not one dam thing would happen, Ms Q is on the board of the National Parks Committee, appointed by obama, I’m sure salazar and Ms Q have never even met.

      • Anonymous

        Quimby was appointed to the board of the National Park Foundation directly by Salazar (who was selected by Obama to be Secretary of Interior).  NPF was set up by Congress in the 1960s to promote the National Park Service.  Salazar is the Chairman of the Board and knows Quimby personally.  The Secretary of the Board is Jon Jarvis, Director of the National Park Service and brother of Destry Jarvis, who was in charge of the NPCA National Park System Plan targeting millions of acres of private property in Maine to be taken over by the National Park Service in 1988.  That plan was the beginning of the Big Park promotion for Maine.

  • Anonymous

    Timorous politicians and deranged constituents seldom achieve anything  worth remembering.

    • Anonymous

       That the best you can do, birdwatcher?

      • Anonymous

         What do you want an atta boy for doing your best to sell yourselves , your best traditions and your posterity not to mention your all consuming economic viability, down the river. You have given way to  fear of the future and sold yourselves so short its sad beyond words.    This NP whole endeavor has a breath of vision that transcends your selfish fear and loathing and promotes a benefit you absolutely refuse to acknowledge, the proud traditions of your country.  You are like deer in a headlight. I  never knew so many folk with such a proud tradition could sink so low.

        • Anonymous

          The people victimized by this radical scheme don’t want Federal control transcending their selves.  That is the proud tradition of American individualism in this country.  It is the power-seeking elitists who sink low.

          • Anonymous

            You’ve used that tea bag too often, ma’m. It’s getting to be a weak and bitter brew.

        • Anonymous

          Why are you so angry?

          • Anonymous

             He’s still mad over that little referendum he lost…

          • Anonymous

            Ya.

             I think he was pi$$ed that the bears were getting more donuts than him.

    • Anonymous

      redsquirrel1: “Timorous politicians and deranged constituents seldom achieve anything  worth remembering.”

      Which has nothing to do with this.  It is yet another smear of the people who have stood up to fight this power grab.

  • Guest

    Hats off to you Susan!!!

    • Anonymous

      Senator Collins, in over a decade of service to Maine, has watched from the side lines as the industry and economy of northern Penobscot and Piscataquis counties reel from job losses, poverty, drug addiction, depression and hopelessness. Without a vision for the future of this area, how can she so confidently dismiss an inquiry into the pros and cons of a national park in the region? Oh yes, because she has been bought by the special interests of the forest products industry. Follow the money Senator Collins.

      • James Leavitt

        Um i will have to respectively disagree with you.  I haven’t done the research yet nor have I done more than personal experience and reading of articles in the BDN, you would see there is a far higher drug problem in Washington County, Hancock County, Waldo County and only Southern Penobscot County than any other area in Northern Maine!  You can search BDN for drug arrest and you’ll see plenty of thefts and burglary all from outside of the 2 counties you named.  The last 2 drug related events in the Katahdin Region was for possession of a few pot plants, not a killing over drug money as in Newburg, NY man being involved in a crack ring in Bangor, $90,000 worth of drugs confiscated in Auburn, 22 oz of pot seized in Searsport.  If you do some research on BDN you will find that drug related events and arrest are not as common as you think they are in the area you are being critical of.  Look all over the state, drugs addiction, depression and hopelessness is far more active in all areas across the state, not the Katahdin Region.  At some point you will all need to look yourself in the mirror and realize that you need to take care of you own before you can take care of others.  You deal with your problems as you see fit and we’ll deal with our problems as we see fit.  
         

        • Anonymous

          I’ve been reading abut the “bath salts” drug problem in Bangor for months. Even the governor has had to get involved. And last time I checked, Bangor was in Penobscot County.

          • Anonymous

            I can see your not from Maine !!

          • Anonymous

            A fellow I know from the Magic City would boast that had the highest  per capita consumption of Budweiser in the US. 

            Is that still true with all the lay offs ? 

          • James Leavitt

            Living in the past bud, statistics from the 70’s doesn’t hold up 30 yrs later.  You should know, we are so poor up here ya know, its natural light!  

  • Anonymous

    Ding Dong, the witch is dead!!!!!!!

  • Anonymous

    The region always has and has been called fat welfare people to boot by RQ. Stay in Bangor.

  • fred flintstone

    Whoo hoo!!!!

  • Anonymous

    Maybe the wicked witch of the East will take a not so subtle hint!

  • Anonymous

    Took them long enough. I think the residents of that region made it quite clear some time ago that they were opposed to this.

    • Anonymous

      — starting almost 25 years ago when the big viro pressure groups started a major campaign to ram it through before people knew what they were up to.

      • Anonymous

        Is that also when LURK also started?

        • Anonymous

          LURC began in the early 1970s, driven by rise of the ecology movement that came out of the 1960s and 70s New Left.  But LURC as implemented head that off and was intended to be only a state stand-in for the lack of zoning in the UT.  It was not implemented as a preservationist agency, which came later from the pressure groups like the Natural Resources Council of Maine.

          Around the same time there was also a drive for a National Park Service takeover in the north woods along the Allagash.  That was partially derailed with state control replacing NPS when the Allagash was listed as one of the original river corridors under the Wild and Scenic River Act of 1968.

          The Big Park plan for Maine that has been promoted and resisted for the last few decades came from political plans in Washington DC in the 1980s, with complicity from state and regional organizations like NRCM, Maine Audubon, Maine Coast Heritage Trust, etc. and national lobbies like the Wilderness Society.  (Restore is an offshoot of the Wilderness Society.) 

          In the 1970s there had been an enormous drive for National Park Service acquisitions all over the country which resulted in tens of thousands of people being badly hurt and a backlash against NPS.  The drive was stalled under the Reagan administration cutting off their funding, but during the Reagan administration the National Park Service and its pressure groups planned to pick up where they had left off with another massive expansion of the National Park System when Reagan was out of office. 

          That is when the nightmare started for Maine.  Northern New England was a strategic top priority in that planning.  We were intended to be the next victims (and still are), but resisted and fought back more than they had anticipated and the big plan failed.  Part of their plan was for a Federal, interstate 26 million acre Greenline Park sweeping from the Maine coast across the UT in Maine, northern NH and VT, and into NY to the Adirondacks.  This is the area Audubon VP and Restore board member Brock Evans referred to in his infamous “take it all speech”. 

          LURC has intended to be a Greenline Park agency for 10 million acres of Maine, which is why the viros are so hysterical now about possibly losing their iron grip control exploiting LURC .  There is a lot of history to this.

    • Anonymous

      60 % of the residents of Maine favor a national park.

      • Anonymous

        99% of the local residents don’t.

        And therein lies the problem for RQ and her band of environazis.

      • poormaniac

        Is that a true conclusion , did you conduct a survey ?  Please post your facts.  Many groups have come out against this and are easily found in this paper’s archives. Where are your “facts” coming from. If you are correct, and I suspect you pulled your percentage out of your …you can count me as one of the 40 %.

      • James Leavitt

        facts go a long ways, post the website or article where the residents of Maine voted or were  polled with the results say that 60% of the residents of Maine want a national park and you could shut up a lot of people.  Not using fact and stating your opinion is no good. 

      • Anonymous

        Doesn’t matter. What does matter is the majority living in the area of the proposed park do not want it.

      • Anonymous

        Yes, but it comes down to the people in the Kathadin Region who will decide. Their opposition is the reason the feds are backing off.

      • Anonymous

         You’ve got too many zeros in that number.

  • Anonymous

    What more can you say but “haha, watermelon environmentalists” (green on the outside, red on the inside).
    Now go enjoy Baxter SP.

  • Anonymous

    Roxanne Quimby……the queen bee of the evil 1%ers.  She’s going to have to feed her greed with some other grand scheme.

    • Anonymous

      I bet she supports OWS, just like michael more does

  • Anonymous

    I would like to see some numbers to support either side of this proposal.  And not WAGS.  Anyone can list all the information as is Collins statement but what are the numbers of the supporters from these regions and associations.  and them Ms Quimby sjhould provide the same maybe they should be presented and suppoted by pettions apporved by the secretary of state.

  • Anonymous

    Yay!
    Please go back to North Carolina Quimby!

  • Anonymous

    Opposed to a study.

    Curious, that.

  • Anonymous

    Sometimes, good people, with a just cause can successfully resist the monies and skewed logic of those who think they have superior ideas and plans for those beneath their standings. Kudos for the wise, salt of the earth Mainers whose voices were heard in sufficient volume to stem the tide of one more individual whose attempt to save our souls was thwarted. Ken

  • Anonymous

    An NPS New Area “feasibility study” is not a study at all.  It is a promotional gimmick to build political momentum for an agenda with a preconceived outcome and that is why Quimby and Restore have demanded it for many years.  This isn’t new and it isn’t a new tactic.

    The cynical attempt to morally intimidate people into going along with this scheme (“How could you be against a study? What are your afraid of?”) is as dishonest as the rest of it.  By Federal law and policy NPS “feasibility studies” are for the National Park Service to decide how it would manage an area and whether they want it when there is already widespread public support for the agenda.  It has nothing to do with a “study” for the benefit of local people and property owners.  The National Park Service and its lobby loudly announced in the 1980s that they want the National Park Service to take over millions of acres of private property in Maine to end industry, development and private property rights.  We already know they want it.

    Maine has systematically and for good reasons rejected this radical political scheme hatched from Washington DC since it was widely promoted beginning in the 1980s.  It has been “studied” to death.  No one needs any kind of government or other outside “study” to tell us what to think.

  • Anonymous

    Wow your heart must be broken that Roxanne’s Park has taken a huge defeat LOL.  Face it the majority of Maine is against this park.  Roxanne did in her park with her comments attacking the Maine people.   It is time for her to sell the land to a developer so we can bring in jobs to the people of  this region along with the East-West Highway to get further growth going to this area.  It is time to send Roxanne back to North Carolina where she can sell her park to the folks down in that part of the country.

    • Anonymous

      The Big Park agenda has been rejected since long before Quimby was involved.  Her obnoxious behavior reminded people of why.

    • Anonymous

      Excuse me, ma’m, but the majority of Mainers ARE in favor of a new national park.

      •  I don’t think that is correct… Do you have some statistics on that?

        • Anonymous

          I think the droningon is still hanging onto that poll where 360 Maine people said YES to a severely embellished sales pitch.

        • Anonymous

           They have no statistics or facts only mindless drivel from rabble rousers.

      • Anonymous

        Not the majority that comments on this thread.  I only count two of you.

        • Anonymous

          “Not the majority that comments on this thread.” 

          They could all fit in a mill town VFW Hall. 

          • Anonymous

            Why then,  the minority could fit into a Porto-Potty.

      • James Leavitt

        Really??   Unless your talking about Southern Maine/Northern Massachusetts wanting Norther Maine as their personal playground.  When you say majority, how about you show us the poll or report that asked the citizens of the state want a national park.  I will never understand why you want something that cost the US more money that we dont have.  I hope your a democrat, hate to see you be critical of Obama’s spending and then want to spend more on something not needed!

      • Anonymous

         Apparently you missed Senator Collins’ speech yesterday…..I think her office was tired of all the letters she was getting.

      • Anonymous

        “Excuse me, ma’m, but the majority of Mainers ARE in favor of a new national park. ”

        INTERESTING POINT  !
        It sounds just like what Voter Initiatives are for. 

        “Resolved;  Despite the influence that a vocal regressive minority and corporate interests 
        have over the Maine Congressional delegation, we the people  of the State of Maine support 
        all and any actions leading to establishment of  a Great North Woods National Park on 
        any private owned land donated for that purpose ” 

        It might need a slight rewrite, granted, but who would sign that ?

        …. how many in Cumberland Country alone  ? 

        : )  

      • Anonymous

        A majority does not support your radical political agenda, nor would a majority have any right to impose it on a minority.

  • RoostookGuy

    Give the land to Baxter State Park.  Doesn’t cost the state of Maine a penny to operate.

    • Liberal Soup N Crackers

      That is not a bad idea but I think there are restrictions to that … not sure though.

  • Anonymous

    OOOOOOOHHHHHHHHhh, did someone say NO to the Queen?    They will pay for that, next week she will put up a gate on I95 Maine/ N.H. border!

  • Anonymous

    The people of the Katahdin Region are the most self-sufficient people in this entire state.

    • Anonymous

      Really? Poaching off the privately owned land of others and living on federal assistance programs? Doesn’t sound like self-sufficiency to me.

      • James Leavitt

        your so right.  The Katahdin Region is the only area in the world living on federal assistance programs, you got us.

        • Anonymous

          To their credit they have backed off on pumping their crap into the River and sending it downstream for everyone else to deal with. 

          That WAS their idea, right ?  

          • James Leavitt

            post the article stating such facts!  Never heard of that

      • Anonymous

        If you are aware of poaching, call OGT. Second, there is more federal assistance programs in the squaller of southern Maine than all of northern Maine combined. Northern Mainers are survivors and the government giveaway programs have nothing to do with it. They are hearty people with more common sense than all of D.C. A recession in this country is just another day for people who are living it every day. Nice try, but Mainers from up north are smarter than most of the people in this state. Common sense seems to drop of significantly south of Medway. This was a Kathadin region decision, not a statewide decision. 

    • Anonymous

      Maybe you should go out to Vinalhaven, or Swans Island, or Matinicus, and explain to them how they aren’t very “self-sufficient.” As opposed to the corporate employees of Katahdin.

      • James Leavitt

        corporate employees??  No suit and ties here buddy, people who go to work here go in clean and come out dirty.  Corporate employees is what you have in southern Maine!  We arent pencil pushers, people here work physically, just like the people on the coast.  

      • Anonymous

        Why would I do that? The people who live in those places are very self-sufficent.

      • Anonymous

        That makes no sense to me.

        • Anonymous

          “That makes no sense to me.”

          Who does that reflect upon ? Can we fairly draw any conclusions about your position from this ? 

  • RoostookGuy

    Fear and anger make people irrational.  Winters are the worst, people are sitting inside watching too much TV and drinking themselves into a “conservative” frenzy.

    Many people don’t care to comment, and who can blame them.

    • Liberal Soup N Crackers

      You get the award of the Daily Irrational Post.

  • 02b9c

    Then hopefully you’ll never have to visit this fine state…I for one blame burt for this whole mess… he should have kept his damn bees… and furthermore, you people from away can just stay away… mainers have lived in maine since inception as a state and we like it that way.

    • Anonymous

      Mainers have been leaving Maine since the civil war, and except for the millions of out of staters who visit us during the summer, we have had a dwindling population in the northern half of the state for decades. Check the census from the last several decades.

      • 02b9c

        I’m not talking about the ones who leave… i’m talking about the ones who stay.

        • Anonymous

          Not many can stay. No jobs for them.

          • 02b9c

            I’m still talking about the ones who stay.

      • James Leavitt

        Leaving since the Civil War?  Wheres your facts on that.  I bet if you researched it you would find that Maine’s population increased since the Civil War.  The reason for the less jobs in northern Maine has a lot to do with organizations who protect the development, Conservation Groups, LURC and many more.  They have prevented any ability to develop land in the north with so many regulations unlike in southern Maine.  There is more than enough room for expansion but regulations would never allow it to happen.  The northern residents have been almost forced to move south for employment as it is easier to establish new business in the southern part of the state.  From that action it would of course lower the census numbers in norther Maine.  How about we get rid of so many regulations and push business to new areas of the states instead of hording thing in the south with Augusta’s politicians and lobbyist  

  • 02b9c

    just for that i’ll bring my starbucks coffee cup for a refill at tim hortons next time…. chuckles…. then i’ll say…. sorry i’m a lunatic…. what do i know.

  • Anonymous

    You learn all that serving coffee to the methadone clients at work?

    • Anonymous

      Hey Bunky
      With that cheery positive attitude Methadone clinics will be the only growth area the local population will support. Come to think about it you’re just about there.

  • Anonymous

    A North Woods Park would be a good way to bring some vitality to an area in serious decline. 

    • Liberal Soup N Crackers

      It would be an empty forest. If you trip in it, would anybody hear?

    • Anonymous

      Forcibly imposed wilderness restrictions are not “vitality”.

  • Anonymous

    don’t give up Roxane

    • Guest

      Why is she in Maine at all??? She hate Maines and the people in it..  I guess she think she knows more of whats good for Maine then Mainers… I say let go to her house and office and tell her how to live and do business… Roxie stay out of our house… 

      • Anonymous

        I want another national park. And when has she told anyone how to live or do business?

        • Liberal Soup N Crackers

          Why don’t you start using the ones we already have.

          • Anonymous

            I do.

        • Anonymous

          She is telling people how not to live with her demands to take control with the Federal government to impose restrictions on behalf of her wilderness ideology.  What you “want” is not a justification for imposing it on other people.

  • Anonymous

    Yeah – thank you Sen. Collins, Snowe and Congressman Michaud. Have made my day! Let’s not give up the fight, though – NO TO QUIMBY!

  • Anonymous

    Headline “Acadia Park contributes 31 billion to local economy”.  Millinocket does not need any government park causing huge amounts of money to be injected in the economy. HERE are the figures from another National Park:Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks and their gateway communities received more than $750 million in tourist spending that supported more than 11,000 jobs in 2010, according to a new report from the National Park Service.The 2.7 million recreation visitors to Grand Teton National Park in 2010 spent more than 41 million.
    That topped economic figures from Yellowstone National Park, where 3.6 million visitors spent more than $334 million in the park and the Montana communities of West Yellowstone, Gardiner and Cooke City, as well as Cody, Wyo.

    Drive your traditional snowmobile until private development prohibits it. Who need the jobs? I am sure it is preferable to have the state have to buy a toxic waste dump to attract a mill buyer  in order to find an employer.

    • Guest

      Keep Maine Maine.  Keeping Maine, Maine would mean logging, fishing, hunting.. 

  • Anonymous

    Headline “Acadia Park visitors contributes 200 million  to local economy”.  Millinocket does not need any government park causing huge amounts of money to be injected in the economy. HERE are the figures from another National Park:Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks and their gateway communities received more than $750 million in tourist spending that supported more than 11,000 jobs in 2010, according to a new report from the National Park Service.The 2.7 million recreation visitors to Grand Teton National Park in 2010 spent more than 41 million.That topped economic figures from Yellowstone National Park, where 3.6 million visitors spent more than $334 million in the park and the Montana communities of West Yellowstone, Gardiner and Cooke City, as well as Cody, Wyo.
    Drive your traditional snowmobile until private development prohibits it. Who need the jobs? I am sure it is preferable to have the state have to buy a toxic waste dump to attract a mill buyer  in order to find an employer.  BAR HARBOR, Maine — A new study from the National Park Service shows visitors to eastern Maine’s Acadia National Park spent nearly $200 million in the park and surrounding towns in 2010. The new report examined the economic benefits that the nation’s 395 national parks brought to their communities ction on Acadia figures  /

    • Guest

      By the time people drive to Millinocket, they are tiried of the woods. Bug bites and the view of a tree is not an attraction.  There must be some other fears you can use to promote your agenda. 

    • Anonymous

      The Baxter State Park and the surrounding area including Quimby’s land is beautiful. However an economic comparison to Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Yosemite, or many other NPs including Acadia is way off scale in the potential for Quimby’s plot. All of the parks you mention are incredibly grand and a lifelong and for many a once in a lifetime destination point for millions of visitors annually. Personally I live within a day’s drive of many of the western national parks and visiting many of them frequently in all seasons over the past 30 years,  it is still awe inspiring every time I go.
      What makes Acadia so popular is Bar Harbor, the coast, the drive up there on Rte 1. If it weren’t next to the ocean, it likely would never had been given a NP designation. I’m originally from Maine and I still visit every summer.
       I love the Katahdin region and have hiked the mountain at least 10 or more times over my lifetime. But the reality is the area is not a draw to “tourist”. It’s wild, it’s pretty, and I guess over time the deer, moose and bear can be tamed to be hand fed too. But what is there to see and experience that is unique? The mountain itself is just a hill compared to the massive ranges out here.
      The National Park system has seen a consistent decline in operations funding even though revenue’s have increased or remain fairly stable. However sections of many parks have been closed to the public due to substantial overhead costs and still not enough revenue to come close to breaking even.
      Simply put, the assessment, the development and operating costs cannot be accounted for to be offset by park and surrounding area revenues.

      • Anonymous

        The opportunity to “do” two National Parks would bring tourists your way. 
        The facts about why the Great North Woods is not so impressive, yet, 
        are just the facts about the way your paper company treat the woods, could be featured
        sorry. 
        AND it is one of the best arguments  for a park, too
        But if you oppose tourism in Maine, just say and be clear about it, please.

    • Liberal Soup N Crackers

      There is no draw that will attract such visitors to Quimbyland. It could never be anything more than a national forest and recreational area.

      • James Leavitt

        I can attest to that, I live in the area, see the tourist  I have also lived in Bar Harbor area, see the tourist and i for one cant tell you that the people that visit Acadia are not the same people who visit Baxter Park.  Just another problem with the state.  Evironmentalist, LURC, Treehuggers, whatever you want to call them have restricted the land and how it is used in northern Maine that there is no hope of manufacturing jobs or a survivable business.  Congrats Southern Mainer’s, you have kept the north available for your own playground. 

  • Anonymous

    With total respect, I would like to say that it is very selfish to say that people in the populated areas should be able to rule over the rural areas, and tell the “hicks” what’s good for them. If the rolls were reversed, and you lived in this area, and were being told, “We have the votes, so to bad for you,” I’m sure you would have a lot to say about being oppressed. “Walk a mile in somewone elses’ shoes,” I beieve is the saying.

    • Anonymous

      Is it any less correct for the few quaint rural people, many of them union men, 
      at that,   who live at the end of the Appalachian Trail to drag down the whole Penobscot River Valley and State because the company/union men want to live in past century ? 

      • James Leavitt

        your personal attacks directed at the people of the region is not really necessary.  You can however state your opinion without trying to negatively spread rumors or blame with unfounded fact.

        • Anonymous

          While the NoParker’s personal attacks on Ms. Quimby are ? 
          Have mentioned that to them ? 
          Why not, Bud ? 

          What a hypocritical fail !

          • James Leavitt

            Find a quote.  I myself have never name called or bashed Ms. Quimby as you have the Katahdin Region.  I have never said she couldnt have HER  park.  The problem lies with HER wanting to donate HER land to the federal government to fund and pay for.  If she wants a park, pay for it, do it yourself, fund it yourself, once you have proof that it will not be a burden on the federal government and the national park service, then donate it to them.  In the fiscal situation the country is in, I am not in favor of taking on anymore fiscal responsibility of any kind no matter how much money you say it would generate.  The idea that a national park would increase the revenue by the amounts of Acadia in the amount of 200 mil.  You already have endless amount of recreational opportunities in the are, a national park is not going to attract a million people per year to increase the revenue by 200 mil.  I will not dispute that the land is hers, she has the right to do what she wants but where does it give her the right to donate the land to a failing company (our government) which puts it further in the hole?  If she wants a park, build it, run it, fund it!! 
             

      • Anonymous

        The viro lobby like Natural Resouces Council of Maine is dragging down the state in its activism on behalf of wilderness preservationism and the destruction of industry, the economy and private property.  No one whom you smear as at the “end of the trail” is, can, or wants to “drag down state”.  Rejecting your impositions is not “dragging you down”.

        The desire to live in the past century is held by those seeking a repeat of National Park Service abuse with its massive land acquisition and restrictions trampling people’s rights on behalf of wealthy big shots with insider political connections — to say nothing of the goals of the radical preservationists to restore millions of acres to the pre-settlement conditions of several centuries ago.

  • Anonymous

    People are not going to come to a new park with the price of gas…Lets fix one problem at a time…

    • Anonymous

      Check out gas prices adjusted for inflation, they really aren’t all that high, and can change quickly. Besides, reading these post one would have to assume that only the elites go to the parks, and I don’t think they are crying over gas prices.

    • Anonymous

       Is that the same as saying snow sleds won’t show up due to the cost of gas? If this is true then the town of Millinocket won’t need that Federal grant for the ATV trail. Cause i know they don’t like the ( FEDS)

  • Anonymous

    droningon reply to outdoorman-“60 % of the residents of Maine favor a national park”

    Since when does 60% of 600 random people polled = 60% of the entire state’s residents? THANK YOU SENATOR COLLINS!!!

    • Anonymous

      Since when do 45 people in Patten Maine make decisions for the nation? Yeah, right.

      • Anonymous

        Who said 45 people in Patten make decisions for “the nation”? The Patten poll was a poll of the Patten area. I don’t recall anyone taking that and saying “The Patten poll represents the nation” as you seem to keep spouting that one survey of 600 random people supposedly statewide represents the entire state. Not so. It represents the opinion of 600 people in the state.You may think “the nation” has the right to dictate to the State of Maine what should be here, but I don’t believe there are a whole lot of Mainers that will agree with that.
        When “the nation” people start living and paying taxes here, they can have their say. As it is, Quimby may own land here, but she doesn’t pay her share of taxes on that land. Perhaps its time for her to pay taxes like the rest of us. What she chooses to do with her land is up to her-except for turning it over to the federal government-than others have a stake and a say in that.
        I find it rather amusing the way you take statements and just drone on and on with misrepresentation of them. Keep up the good work, everyone needs a good laugh now and then.

  • Guest

    The Maine Insane want you to Stay away!!!  We are fine without people telling us we don’t conform to there view of the world… Move to and fix Haiti, They could use your help there.

    • Anonymous

      Northern Maine has a lot in common with Haiti.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you darling.

  • Liberal Soup N Crackers

    Make sure you stay to F%^$ out.

  • Liberal Soup N Crackers

    Missing in all of this is the simple fact that the land in question does not meet the established criteria for a national park. At the most it can only be a national forest and recreational area.

    • Anonymous

      Is there a web site to read that, that way the tree people can read it themselves instead of calling you a liar like they so often do to people the do not agree with them.

  • Anonymous

     Its all about priorities.  An utterly skewed and delusional sense of self interest that can’t help but leave its proponents utterly screwed is the No. one priority in this proudly nut job bird sanctuary.

    • Anonymous

      If yo think it is that bad then hop on 95 south or north. Either way it will take you to your promise land.

  • Anonymous

     That’s not a true picture of  a large majority of  the population.  But that perception is out there, no doubt about that.  Taken together with a lunatic fringe governor whose iconic slogan proclaims the state is  “open for business” you can readily imagine how jobs are streaming into Maine.

  • Anonymous

    Oh well we continue with a 22% unemployment rate and a dying paper industry. 

    • Anonymous

       Why don’t you try getting off your laurels and promoting the region? A business owner cannot sit back and expect business to magically appear. It takes hard work and effort to attract customers. Expecting a National park to come in and “save the day” is just plain foolish.

  • 02b9c

    Maine used to stand proud as a state , we had shoe shops all over maine as well as textile mills along with woods and paper industries…. what happend?… i blame the federal government for allowing companys to go abroad for cheaper labor and also for other countries sending their wares here at a cheaper price….how can we fix this for maine?…you look at the ships from other countries fishing offshore from maine… you look at our logs being transported to canada and then that wood coming back over as cheaper lumber… how do we fix this for maine?

    • Anonymous

       Feds allowed all the businesses to go oversea.  What were they supposed to do lock them up?  Are you up for a Down East variant of North Korea.  A state so tightly controlled everybody wants to get out and nobody wants to get in.  Maybe  building A-bombs in Ka Ta Din is the answer.   All you folks seem to have a hit list all made out.  You wouldn’t need missiles.  You could get by with snow mobiles for delivery.  Lots on this string would drive them.

      • 02b9c

        no not lock them up… but i would have damn sure made it hard for them fat cats to take it overseas…. a hit list as you say…what state are you from?….yes this state is tightly controlled and it’s high time mainers take it back.. or we’ll be cannon fodder from folks from away.

        • Anonymous

          HaHaHaHa!

           You just insulted the rudest flatlandah to ever move here.

    • 02b9c

      And lets talk about Wal-mart in maine…. here where i live you could almost buy anything here in town.. plenty of stores and plenty of merchindise… now we have a wal-mart, and it’s the only place in town you can buy unerwear or shoes or a small selection of clothes… many jobs were lost for the big box store.

    • 02b9c

      I still have faith in the state of maine… i’ve been here all my life and i will be buried here ( and now a short break for the church of the holly cabbage… lettuce pray)…. i’ll always have hope for the state of maine… without hope there is nothing.

  • Anonymous

    Oh well we will continue to have a 22% unemployment rate, their is little demand for paper and now you guys will have to deal with Roxanne instead of the Feds. Good luck with that. I believe the snowmobile season next year will be quite difficult.

    • Anonymous

      Oh well, things are not going your way so you wish doom on the Katahdin area and its people! How nice of you.. GET LOST!!!!

  • Anonymous

    It’s obvious the folks that are Quimby’s lapdogs here will never see it any other way other than their own. This small defeat has left them quibbling over meaningless manusha,  with no solid fact based points. They only leave insults (which they were the first to set the insultive toinetone but will never se it that way). I am convinced that they have always viewed the conservative Northern Mainer with contempt. They over inflate their own intelligence level and use the approach that we all from the North (hicks) don’t really have the intellect to know what is good for us, so they will make that decision for us. This mentality is carried all over our country by “The Left”, and has changed the political landscape. This park proposal had much deeper meaning to many different people for many different reasons, of which the meer fact of the park itself was overshadowed by one group of people pushing their core values onto another group of people. The more one side dug in, the more the other side countered. This usually doesn’t happen this way. For the most part, the conservative base, and even some middle of the roaders have been asleep at the wheel politically for a long time, not bothering to get involved. This is why the Left has been so successful at delivering their message, and carrying through with it. They usually go unchecked even though nationally they are still in the minority. In this state it’s different. Yes, Cumberland and York county outnumber the rest of the state, and by and large have dictated policy for a long time. This victory for the lack of a better term should be treated as temporary. The left is very good at presenting an issue in such a way that looks attractive or harmless on the surface,  but underneath it’s a whole different ball of wax. Then if anyone gets in their way, they become accusatory siting that people must be deranged or foolish to reject such a bold idea. 50 years ago this was the same approach the Soviet government took toward their citizens that rejected Communism. Those people were sent to asylums because they were deemed physiologically insane for not believing in the system. That same ideology could very easily occur here in the future. So, in the future people need to be very smart at the ballot box and understand what they are voting for. This will be very important this year. Most of what is presented to us politically is coded as something different from what the face value is. This park proposal epitomized this . Call it paranoia if you want. Doesn’t matter. Call me anything you wan, doesn’t matter. I’m just doing what most liberals have been doing for a long time. Getting a message out, and getting people to listen.

  • Anonymous

    Hmmm now we can continue with our 22% unemployment rate with no end in sight. It is not reasonable to say that a National Park and a paper company cannot co exist. Baxter State park has done it since its inception. What we really have is people who are paranoid that the feds will gobble up our state.
    Now we can deal with Roxanne Quimby one on one and try to convince her to allow snowmobiles, ATV’s and hunting.. Good luck with that!

    • Anonymous

      Same comment over and over and over. Are you done yet?

    • Anonymous

      It is not reasonable for the National Park Service and its pressure groups to push people around and try to destroy industry using authority under the Federal government.  It is not reasonable to gratuitously accuse people refusing to be subjected to that as “paranoid”.  The viros have a one-stroke “paranoid” key on their keyboards because they have nothing to say to defend their position against that.

  • Anonymous

    Poor Roxanne. My heart bleeds for her. Oh, by the way, if you believe that I have some prime real estate for sale overlooking the Appenine mountain range on the Moon.

  • me in me

    yeah!! Sensible citizens -1      Roxanne Quimby-0

You may also like