Comments for: Mass. police officer sought in shooting of another police officer

Posted Feb. 24, 2012, at 9:51 p.m.

BEVERLY, Mass. — Police are on the lookout for a Massachusetts police officer who is suspected of shooting another police officer on Friday evening. Massachusetts State Police put out a regionwide notice to be on the lookout for a 43-year-old male who is considered armed and dangerous, and suicidal. He …

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  • Anonymous

    No picture?

  • Anonymous

    aren’t all police armed and dangerous.. hope they take care  more of each another in this manner

    • Many people defend and revere police officers merely by virtue of their choice of profession. I am of the opinion that no person deserves merit until they have done something to warrant it. Few people join the academy because they truly want to make the world a better place. If more did there wouldn’t be such rampant corruption. The fact many people are unable to accept is that the vast majority of officers will throw justice under the bus in the name of protecting their brothers in blue.

      • Anonymous

        Spoken like a true anonymous commenter.  Lots of hot air, no truth. 

        • How am I anonymous? I am actually using my real first name, unlike you. What specifically in my statement is untrue? Apparently seven other people also like your baseless, incredibly vague response, though I cannot see why.

          • Anonymous

            I think you would agree that even if that is your first name, there is no actual credibility that comes with including it.  What is not true is the following statement:

            “Few people join the academy because they truly want to make the world a
            better place. If more did there wouldn’t be such rampant corruption. The
            fact many people are unable to accept is that the vast majority
            of officers will throw justice under the bus in the name of protecting
            their brothers in blue.”

            I have known cops on a personal level for 20 years.  I have had the privileged of working many all around the state for the last 10.  I find your state inaccurate, uniformed, stereotyped and biased.

            While I won’t attach my own experiences to you specifically, I will say that your comments are typical of one who has, or whose family has been caught by the police a number of times.  In true American fashion, it’s never their fault and it’s easier to blame the cops.  Everyone “got railroaded” after they talked to their lawyer.  Everyone is a victim except for those who actually had a crime committed against them.

          • Guest

            funny—you are so worried about carleton stereotyping cops, and you just stereotyped him.  That someone is critical of the actions of the average, modern-day police officer means “they have been caught by the police a number of times…”??  I am LONG retired, but have noticed the changes in their attitudes and actions both on and off-duty over the past 17 years….it’s quite disturbing—so I’ll continue to be as critical as I want to be.

          • Anonymous

            Stereotyping him?  My words were ”
            While I won’t attach my own experiences to you specifically.”

            17 years is a long time, guess you need to get back into the game to make a informed opinion.

          • Guest

            …and you ALSO said:  “I will say that your comments are typical of one who has, or whose family has been caught by the police a number of times.”, thus stereotyping him.

            why is it, in your mind, that anyone who is critical of law enforcement actions is critical because they’ve “been caught too many times by the cops?”

            (btw, I’m still “in the game”…I’m to old to be a bat boy, I’ve moved up to GM.)

          • Anonymous

            Is it a stereotype when its backed by years of training and experience?  How can I be stereotyping him if I specifically excluded him?

            The rest of your comments are based on assumptions about my thoughts and opinions.  

            As far as being a GM, you’re either retired for the last 17 years or not.  But for the sake of argument, I’ve always said that if you want the truth about what (in this case) cops are doing and seeing, ask the street cops, not their Chief who has’t been in a cruiser or even on a typical call for 20 years.  

      • Anonymous

         The issue that moonbats Haskell, Cain , LePage and the readers of this post refuse to acknowledge
        is the psychological effect our current model of law enforcement has on our evolution as a species.
        Our current law enforcement model simply stated is based on two things.
        1. arresting a crime
        2. solving a crime

        We hire mercenaries newly minted from the Iraq war to protect us from violence
        and aggression committed by members of our community.
        For the most part we never have to deal with violence and aggression because all we have to do is pick up the phone and call 911, eh?

        At some point in this process usually after decades, the natural ability to deal with violence is bred out of humans and the mercenaries are now in charge.

        • Anonymous

           I think that is an over-the-top, over simplified theory there msfreeh.  Based on your hypothesis, we should have no law enforcement, thereby society can be ruled by vigilantes and the survival of the fittest, to ensure we maintain our ability to deal with violence? 

      • Anonymous

         Carlton, could you provide some evidence to support your claim that the “vast majority” throw justice under the bus?  Admittedly, there are bad apples in the profession, just like any other profession.  The difference is that, when one goes bad, it attracts an abundance of press attention, thereby giving the impression that all (or most) law enforcement professionals are corrupt.  Quite the contrary, I dare say.  If you consider the large number of law enforcement professionals across the country (local, county state and federal), and then consider the number of corrupt individuals, the statistic is rather small.  Of course, in my opinion, even one corrupt cop is one too many, but lets relax on the “their all corrupt” mantra.  It is grossly untrue, and only serves to inflame the hype.

      • Anonymous

        All too often people hear about the few “bad” cops. They don’t hear about the ones who are Worthy. The ones who don’t abuse their power. Police officers get a bad rap for….Just doing their jobs. I appreciate you taking a stand in saying not all police are bad.  My Father(he died when I was 11 yrs old), My adopted Father, And My mother were all Police Officers. They went by the the saying: There is no honor among Thieves. I am here to protect and serve the public. I am not here to lie and cover Co-workers crimes.       

    • Anonymous

      And you.

  • Anonymous

    Another Masshole runamok.

    • Anonymous

       like so many maine hicks

    • Anonymous

      He was found the same night a few hours after the incident….notice how Bangor Daily updates their stories….

  • Anonymous

    Beverly is located in Essex County, across the bridge from Salem, Massachusetts. The Salem Evening News is reporting that a Beverly Police Officer was shot in the leg by Hamilton Police Sergeant Kenneth Nagy. Hamilton is a small town north of Beverly that is located south of Ipswich on what I believe is Route 1A in Massachusetts. The Massachusetts State Police and other departments are looking for the suspect in the vicinity of Rowley, Massachusetts. From the way the article is written it appears that the Beverly Office was off duty.

  • Anonymous

    Being a police officer I would think they would have a current picture in his file. They could publish this since he is considered in danger as well as dangerous. Hello???? Picture please?

    Pardon me, Cops don’t get their pictures in the paper no matter what they do, only robbers….

    • Anonymous

      The Salem Evening News has reported about this in much more detail and says that the shooter, a police sergeant with the Hamilton Police Department is being searched for in the area of Rowley, Massachusetts. Both these towns are in Essex County, about 40 miles or so north of Boston.

  • Anonymous
  • Guest

    He thought he saw antlers and a white tail. The cop that got shot was wearing orange.

  • Anonymous

    You two are agreeing with each other, though I’m not surprised you both don’t seem to know it.  Your arguments are juvenile.

    • And your penchant for insulting people with whom you disagree is not? The least you could do is provide a resonable rebuttal if you so thoroughly disagree with our comments. Otherwise, one’s credibility suffers.

      It’s easy to randomly insult people when you’re on BDN forums anonymously, isn’t it?

      • Anonymous

        I’m sorry that it insults you that I pointed out that you and bdymaniam were agreeing with each other yet arguing with each other.  Beyond that, your comments speak for themselves.  So yes, you do make it easy.  I don’t feel it necessary to say anymore on it.

        • Anonymous

          Do us all a favor  and leave out the last two words of your last sentence.

          • Anonymous

            Yeah, I’d say I wrapped it up nicely, thanks for noticing.

  • Be on the lookout for a killer cop with no picture on file…

  • Anonymous

    plate number here would help find the guy, don’t ya think…?

  • I don’t like police in general myself, but I refuse to lump the truly good police officers in with the corrupt majority. I realize there are actually officers who will stand up for justice and do what is right regardless of who is implicated. These are the officers I respect.

  • Anonymous

    We get it. When you tried to join, they shot you down — probably on a mental thing — and you never really got to prove that you had what it takes. Which of course, you don’t.  See, that’s the thing about Paris(sic) Island: You find out what you’re made of..

    Damn. What a bitter life you’ve been condemned to..

    • Anonymous

      Obviously the poster does not realize that you need a diploma or a GED to get in to the service and be able to get an acceptable ASVAB score. I had a young co-worker whose score on the ASVAB was so low that the army would not take him until he took remedial classes and was able to bring his score up. He had barely passed high school but he got serious.

      I wonder if the poster stops to consider that he perhaps could be posting in German or Japanese if my” serial killer “family members had not served in World War Two. I do not agree with the serial killer term, just use it to show how much contempt I have for it. 

      Perhaps the poster did try to join up and got rejected. It appears that he might have tried to become a police officer or corrections officer and got rejected there as well.

  • Anonymous

    The cop that shot the other cop, his wife was banging the other cop……I’d have shot him too….

  • Anonymous

    and update your story BDN, the cop committed suicide at the original scene, he came back and shot himself

  • Anonymous
  • Maybe a name, description or picture would be helpful in identifying him.  As a police officer he probably knows one thing he would need to do is get rid of the car they are looking for.  

  • Anonymous

    Wow, too bad this didnt happen in Maine…maybe we would have had our first UN-justified shooting from a cop….oh well.

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