Comments for: Congress can keep Maine’s solar momentum going

Posted Feb. 13, 2012, at 4:40 p.m.

The solar industry is one of the few bright spots in an otherwise struggling economy. I speak from personal experience. My solar company, Talmage Solar Engineering, Inc. has grown by more 400 percent over the last three years. Since the recession hit, we’ve hired scores of installers, engineers and administrators …

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  • Anonymous

    Here in Maine, the 1603 Program has driven $480 million in private clean tech investment 

    Where does this number come from?

    I have a hunch it comes from a Boston company buying a few Chinese turbines, and hiring a Massachusetts crew to install them on a Maine mountain, and calling it a “Maine investment”.

    • streamweaver

      And using a Michigan trucking company exclusively for transporting the monsters.

    • Anonymous

      Love it

  • Anonymous

    The end result is growth in an industry that has allowed American citizens to regain control of the cost of their electricity and the source of their fuel.

    If by “regain control of the cost of their electricity”, you mean “choose to pay more for ‘green’ power”, then this might be true.

    But outside of paying this premium, we don’t have any more control than we ever did, do we?

  • On site solar means you take matters in your own hands.
    You buy the system .  It is yours. You are green 1 watt at a time.

    You sound like a GRID scale company wanting to plug in over thousands of miles….loss in transmission.  bad.

  • Anonymous

    After solyndra I don’t think solar power will get much support.  It will work without government money if and when the time is right.  Only government  and rich elitest can afford to install solar systems.

    • Anonymous

      “It will work without government money if and when the time is right.”
      Kinda like the Oil Industry working without government money???  

      • Anonymous

        The oil companies get tax breaks from existing tax laws.  They spend their own money on things that create millions of jobs, you can’t and never will be able to that with solar companies.  Solar power is a novelty for the elites. 

        • Anonymous

          Wow – China is investing heavily in solar and wind.

          China is planning to install 15,000 MW of new solar generating capacity by 2015.India plans to install 22,000 MW of PV capacity by 2022.

          Why are these impoverished countries investing so much money in “novelty” solar?

          Cuz they are smarter than US conservative elites.

          yessah

          • Anonymous

            China is a large producer of polysilicon, for use in first generation solar cells around the world. A byproduct of the process is silicon tetrachloride, which is normally processed and recycled at a higher cost in the developed world, is often dumped by Chinese green startups. This substance is described as poisonous, polluting, and “like dynamite”. These polluting polysilicon plants are said to be the new dot-coms in China. With proper recycling the polysilicon would cost $84,500 per tonne, but the Chinese companies are making it at $21,000 to $56,000 a ton.[5]
            China is only in the the sloar business so it can sell it to foolish investors.  99% of all solar power and equipment from China is sold outside the country.

    • Anonymous

      Solyndra was a victim of Chinese subsidies for its domestic solar industy.

      The Chinese government financed billions of dollars worth of new massive (1000 MW per year) highly automated state-of -the-art PV module plants in China.

      They flooded the market with cheap PV modules – and global PV module prices crashed – to less than $1 a peak watt.

      Solyndra was not the only PV manufacturer to suffer from this.

      One silver lining – at current (low and dropping) prices,  everyone can afford to install solar systems.

      Yessah

  • We can power the state with renewable energy. We can also resist moving with the rest of the world and continue to support the fossil fuel industry. How do ya like the price of heating oil? Been to a gas station lately? What a deal. Lets just keep drilling.

    • Anonymous

      Then you should be advocating for clean, affordable, renewable hydro power.  Instead the “green” left only advocates for the most expensive, unreliable power sources.  A suspicious person might think that the left wants to drive Mainers out of the state so they can have a personal playground.

  • Anonymous

    Yes lets dig out all your records and audit. Lets see if what you say is true. In the record it should show all your manufacturing buddies here in the states, all your local employees here in Maine, your local hardware suppling the nuts and bolts your fleet of trucks, and so on. Let’s see it. Put your reputation where your mouth is.   

  • Patten_Pete

    Explain to me what solar photovoltaic has to do with oil drilling.

  • Anonymous

    Just another businessman pimping for his subsidy.

    • Guest

      well said

  • Guest

    I support any form of energy that can survive without subsidies

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