October 24, 2017
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Comments for: Potato industry expecting crop losses of 25 to 30 percent

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  • Anonymous

    Global warming has real costs. 

    • Anonymous

      and it has its benefits , if one is willing to change the type of crop , such as concord grapes and northern types of plums which are now growing up here , and quite nicely indeed.

      • Anonymous

        Ayup, theah is big benefit for patayta farmahs
        and the whole industry  … the economic base of the community.  
        Theah are no hidden costs theah. 

        But suah diversify, judiciously.
        That is always a good common sense response to change.

        Howevah, given the rate of climate change that we can all observe,
        tree crops, except for bananas, which bare in two years, 
        might not be such  good bet, though.

        • Anonymous

          Global warming also has extended our growing season. Earlier and warmer springs means bigger potatoes. Our crop in Southern Aroostook looks great. Nice yields and good quality.

          • Anonymous

            Where do all the good potatoes go? There aren’t any good potatoes for sale at Hannaford.

          • Anonymous

            McCain Foods for french fries. sorry

        • Anonymous

          i”m just trying something differant to see if it works out , if it dont  i”ll try something else.

      • Anonymous

        are you a grape farmer? or just commenting as if you know what your talking about?

        • Anonymous

          yes i started experimenting in it a few years ago , learnt about it from a friend in rhode island.
           , pretty easy once one knows a few tricks , i”m not a big farmer by no means , i just have about 24 acres to work on.

          •  No kidding…in Aroostook county ? I’ve been thinking about starting some Concord vines and Apricots, which I hear are similar to growing plums. Thx for the info JW…gonna give it a go this year. Ever check out St Lawrence nurseries btw ? They sell northern varieties of most fruit…

          • Anonymous

            I have grapes, I find one year you’ll have a lot and the next year not so much and both years a lot of theft.

          • Anonymous

            i find the same thing happening with raspberries and hazelnuts.

          • Anonymous

            the hardest part is waiting thru the winter and worrying if they”ll make it , i”ve tried just about everything , even watermellon , i had only one small mellon and it was not ripe enough , i do this just to see what will grow and what will not , i”m retired so it gives me something to experiment with , i love science , st lawrence are great people , try it out , if someone doesn”t try it we”ll never know.

          • Guest

            ….

      • Anonymous

        There is actually some statistical research being done on climate change that suggests that, though the climate is warming (man made or natural), the variability of the climate is increasing.  What that means for a farmer is that, though the local climate may warm up, it may still be variable enough that the farmer cannot count on a earlier spring frost free date or a later fall one.  Though it may warm up enough to grow wine grapes in northern Maine most years.  Some years there may still be an old time, early September frost, killing the grapes on the vine, for example. But I agree that for now anyway, some crops that didn’t work before in the north, are working.

        Your optimism for a silver lining in the Global Warming debate is admirable, but there are no guarantees on climate change.

    • Anonymous

      Is it global warming or global change? I suppose it’s the one phrase that happens to be the most politically expedient. In other words, it depends on shifting political winds and, guess what, the weather too at times.

  • Anonymous

    Lousy news for a county that still makes a significant part of its living off the land. Make no mistake, most of these farmers are big businesses and a 30% loss is a ton of money.

  • Anonymous

    “Global warming has real costs.” YEAH,YEAH,YEAH! Polar bears are gone, and the sea’s are going to flood the whole east coast to include the potato fields of Maine! God, give us a break!

    • Anonymous

      Are you disputing the extreme damage to polar bears that’s already occurring?

  • Anonymous

    Gotta love those BDN editors who still pine for a Pulitzer Prize.
    Wonder where they pulled that word “excessive weather” from?
    Rumor in the whisper stream is the publisher has hired a speech therapist to work with the staff on pronouncing the words climate change and global warming.LOL
    Ross Gelbspan was an editor at the Boston Globe when his supervisors pulled him off investigating the FBI  and put him in charge of investigating climate change and global warming.
    Ross had already won a Pulitzer as he took the assignment to heart and attended all the Kyoto conferences starting in  1991 while writing two books about Global Warming in the process.
    Visit Ross at his website about Climate Change and read more about how it is destroying our food crops.  http://www.heatisonline.org

    • Anonymous

      “Wonder where they pulled that word “excessive weather” from?”

      “Meteorologists said that Caribou got 7.93 inches of rain that month, breaking the old record of 6.83 inches set in 1957. June was also a record-setter, with 9.03 inches.”… “and three tornadoes that went through the area early last June.” 

      Need any other help ?

      • Anonymous

        explain the “medieval warm period” or the “little ice age” that Maine has already witnessed?

        • Anonymous

          Explain this: for the past 150,000 years, the carbon content of the atmosphere has stayed steady at 250 ppb., plus or minus 10 ppb because of volcanos etc.   During the past 150 years, the carbon content of the atmosphere has risen to now, in 2011, 392 ppb.  As an armchair scientist, surely you can see what the results of us throwing carbon into the air will have.  Or will you, like Rush, bury your head in the sand?  “It (global warming) can’t be happening because I say so.”  As he walks to the bank with his millions made by pandering to those who don’t want to see.

          • Anonymous

            and you are Climate Scientist? Did you get your data from the corrupt UN studies? Haha no credibility there bub.

          • Anonymous

            whatever happens we”ll just have to adapt as best we can.

          • Guest

            Please take a look at the graph below.  Over the past 150,000 years, we have gone through a total of five glacial/interglacial stages (before the one we’re in now), all exhibiting significant temperature fluctuations.  As we’ve learned, temperature fluctuations are reflected in carbon dioxide records.  Therefore, the levels have not been “steady”, but fluctuating between 180 and 290 ppb on the hundred thousand year time scale.  That is significant.  I don’t dispute that carbon dioxide has increased significantly in recent, but to say that it has remained steady until now is not true.

            http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/trends/co2/graphics/vostok.co2.gif

      • Anonymous

         my apologies D………. I guess I did not connect the dots for you between global warming, climate change, crop failure
        and the word excessive weather.
        eh?

        • Anonymous
          • Anonymous

             thanks for posting.
            the man sitting next to Bill Maher in the video is Van Jones who I interviewed
            in New Bedford  Mass in 2010 after he gave the keynote speech at the annual Bioneers conference. I also interviewed Shrimp Boat Captain Diane Wilson who is one of my heroes.
            you can watch it here   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeNjKPCmLJk&feature=related

        • Anonymous

          You mean like how extreme weather has been predicted as a sign of the effects of
          global warming ?

      • Anonymous

        i don’t think that the tornadoes had that much effect on the farm land itself.  Just another segment of the weather they can embelish.

    • poormaniac

      Wonder why he was pulled off of the investigation of the FBI.

      • Anonymous

         Ross covered our first conference investigating crimes committed by the FBI for the Boston Globe in 1989. It was held at Boston University and co-sponsored by Professor Howard Zinn.
        He went on to write a book 2 years later about the FBI  called BREAK INS DEATH THREATS AND THE FBI.
        The book looks at taxpayer funded FBI  agents working with the death squads in El Salvador to
        assassinate school teachers and labor activists.
        see   http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/FBI/Breakins_DeathThreats_FBI.html
        Break-ins, Death Threats
        and the FBI

        the covert war against the Central America movement

        by Ross Gelbspan

        South End Press, 1991

  • We are actually coming out of the last Ice Age presently which is scary. Mass extinctions on Earth seem to occur right after Ice Ages end….and with 2012 here…OMG !!! Lol….

  • Anonymous

    “U.S. Sens. Susan Collins and Olympia Snowe successfully secured $400,000 from the Farm Services Agency at the U.S. Department of Agriculture through its Emergency Conservation Program last July to help 50 farmers whose farms were damaged.”

    There’s that evil Big Government at work again… So many people would like to drown government in the bathtub–without recognizing the benefits we all get from it.

  • Anonymous

    The potato is a perfect example of how To grow on barren ground, spray baby spray.

  • cleanearth

    Monoculture (one crop) crops grown mostly for export out of state – like the so-called (sprayed with pesticides, seared with burning oil, etc.) “wild” blueberries will always ruin the land, because one crop grown on the same land for years invites disease and pestilence – in spite of tons of poison chemicals poured on them.

    You can’t fool Nature.  You mistreat the land and the tiny microorganisms that live in the soil and you will reap the whirlwind. 

    What Maine needs is many thousands of small farms which grow diverse crops so if one fails, others make it.  We need these farms to supply food for MAINE people.

    Anyone can grow potatoes – and without the herbicides and pesticides the big growers use.

    Buy some organic potatoes from the supermarket (non-organic potatoes are often sprayed so they won’t sprout) , then just throw them on the ground on top of the grass, pile hay or straw or dirt on top of the potatoes to about a foot, then hill up the plants as they grow keeping a few inches of plants above ground, then let them grow out and in the fall you’ll have your winter’s potatoes.  Then you’ll be left with beautiful, organic soil for next year’s garden, in which you will not grow potatoes again for a few years.

    Easiest way to grow potatoes and other food crops is in raised beds.  Now large farms will complain they can’t build that many, but raised beds drain water, and the soil stays put instead of washing away.

    Why should we taxpayers have to pay for careless farming practices when we know better?

    I’m an organic grower, have never used pesticides, and keep a close eye on my crops so I know when there’s a problem.  But for success, one needs to be in the fields, not in an enclosed tractor spraying poisons or tearing up the soil.

    With raised beds, you never need a machine, just put your composted kitchen and yard waste on top of the raised beds for fertilizer each year, and there you go. 

    You just walk up and down the raised beds fluffing up the soil, picking the tiny weeds in spring, then planting, then weeding, then harvesting.

    Easy peasy, but it does require actual, genuine physical work.  Big industrial growers will say they have too much land for that – well, divide it up and let sheep and/or chickens graze on the fallow land to put the nutrients back in.   

    I don’t want my tax money to go to land-wasters anymore.  They need to diversify their crops – grow crops in rotation including legumes and animals to put nutrients back into the soil, stop using poisons which get into our groundwater and drinking water, and use good, old-fashioned physical work with raised beds for best efficiency and best (and more) crops. 

    Back to common sense and working with Nature instead of killing the land.

    • Anonymous

      You make it sound so easy. You need to put down your organic herbs and come back to the real world. If we all did what you say it would be a disaster. What do they do with their million dollar potato storages? You will probably say turn them into art galleries or something. Banks, business and communities need these farms.

      • cleanearth

        Growing our food without poisons is the real world.  The unreal world – that of the chemical companies insisting agribusiness “needs” these chemicals – is what’s poisoning our drinking waters and sickening our children, and ourselves.

        I’m advocating for more farms, not fewer.  We need thousands more families to have a good livelihood growing food for their families and for others to buy, hopefully locally so they don’t have the added cost of transporting the food far away  

        As to what the big business farmers could do with their potato storage houses?  Well, they could store their own potatoes and other produce through winter, and if there’s extra space, charge a modest fee for others to store their winter food and their saved seed in there, too. 

        Organic potato farmers rarely have blight diseases because they create healthy soil in which to grow crops, not depend on the latest manmade toxic chemical to force unnatural growth in crops.

        Anyway, pesticides and fertilizers made by chemical companies are derived from oil, so as the price of oil rises, so will the price of these poisons.  Let’s hope this drives some who refuse to stop poisoning us all to drop their use and……start working with Nature instead of trying to kill it.

        There is no longer any excuse for using manmade poisons on food crops.  We know too many ways to grow food without them. 

        Get a few books out of the library.  Everything’s easy once you know how – this also applies to organic farming, which is growing at the rate of 40 percent a year because of  consumer demand. 

  • Anonymous

    But remember – there is no anthropogenic global warming  – and even if it exists, it will bring us “prosperity”.

    Or so we are told by the low-information anti-science clown squad.

    yessah

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