November 18, 2017
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Comments for: Route 9 closed in Beddington for 12 hours

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  • Anonymous

    What?  No crater?  No automatic explosion of the propane truck?  Someone tell those guys in Searsport!

    • Anonymous

      I was thinking the same thing! BLEVE! 27 Hiroshima Bombs! Terrorist attack!
      The truth is propane trucks roll up and down the road every day. How many houses have you heard about blowing up from their propane tanks?

      • Anonymous

        bleves only occur when the boiling liquid cant vent , tanks and trucks have vent design features to minimize the change.

        the gas can in you garage, grill tank, car gas tank , hot water heater in your home can bleve- in fact home hot water heaters are a much greater risk than an industrial tank

        • Anonymous

          Agreed, tell that to the NIMBYS in Searsport!

        • Guest

          BLEVEs occur when the pressure in a vessel drops rapidly, and if there is an ignition source that’s when the fire ball occurs. But you are correct in the rest of your post. Any liquid under pressure has the potential to BLEVE when the conditions are met.  As far as the NIMBY crap… I wish they would build this tank in my back yard.  Scaring the tourists off??? GREAT!!! That will clear up RT 1 in good shape in the summer, it’s quite annoying to sit in traffic or wait to get onto RT 1. My only question is… why hasn’t this been built already?!   And to go along with posts further down, it is a great thing that neither driver was seriously hurt. Accidents happen, are we going to stop living our lives because of it?? NO!

          • Anonymous

            Ok schematics, because it cant vent the pressure builds up which cuases a rupture and corresponding drop in pressure which with ignition causes fireball

    • Anonymous

      Don’t be foolish.
      This could have had devastating effects.
      Had the paper truck burned under the propane truck it could have looked like this:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFapoD6Ct7Y&feature=endscreen&NR=1

      Watch to the end and see what happens when a fire at DCP’s LPG terminal reachs the GAC chemical plant.

    • Anonymous

      How foolish.  It could have been a disaster if the propane truck ended up on top of the burning paper truck.  Just watch:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFapoD6Ct7Y&feature=endscreen&NR=1At the end you can see what would happen if a fire at DCP’s LPG tank reached the GAC chemical plant next door.

  • Anonymous

    I stopped by and gave them a tow….

  • Anonymous

    To sarcastic folks like myotherbrotherdarrell and to those who are under the honest impression that concerns about the dangers of transporting liquefied propane are negligible, I have one thing to say: they were just lucky — this time. 

    As far as I know, MOBD,  no one in Searsport has suggested propane trucks necessarily explode upon impact as they might do in some cheesy movie made for adolescents, something you might be familiar with. On the other hand, as a quick check of the many You Tube videos will readily demonstrate, these big tanker trucks loaded with as much as 17,000 gallons of ground-hugging highly volatile liquid fuel (and rail tank cars with as much as 34,000 gallons) sometimes really do catch fire and sometimes they really do explode.

    Here in Searsport where I live, DCP Midstream has made public it intends to increase tanker truck traffic in and out of Mack Point accessing already crowded Route 1 by some 30 percent. According to the company’s own projections, during their busiest season — and the precise period when conditions are iciest — on any given day DCP plans on having almost 300 tanker trucks turning into or out of Station Avenue, smack in a built-up residential and commercial neighborhood. 

    No matter how well trained and alert their truck drivers, there’s no telling when another vehicle that is irresponsibly driven is coming along. According to the Maine DOT, some 3.8 million vehicles travel on Route 1 through Searsport annually, over 10,000 a day on average. At peak delivery times in the dead of winter, DCP’s plans call for a shot at disaster on Searsport’s Main Street at the intersection with Station Avenue about once every five minutes around the  clock.

    Route 1 really is our Main Street, the primary thoroughfare in town most all of us use to go to work, go shopping, deliver and return our children to and from school, visit family and friends. Among many other things, we don’t like the odds DCP would impose on us each year moving tens of millions of gallons of dangerous propane through our town.

    • Why do i get the feeling you typed that with your nose in the air and your pinky extended away from your tea cup and possibly wearing a monocle?

      • Anonymous

        Because you’re a simple person who needs to see the world in cartoon terms?

        • Anonymous

          LOL…now thats funny

        • Anonymous

          Perhaps he could publish a cartoon in that newspaper of yours…..you know, the one with the smallest circulation in Maine…..no, make that, the smallest circulation in the world.

    • Sometimes planes crash, sometimes cars catch on fire, sometimes boats sink, sometimes pedestrians get hit by cars. How many things so you want to eliminate based on “sometimes”? Have you given up flying? Given up driving? I think your biggest problemn is a ‘not in my backyard” attitude. Probably if it wasn’t next to your house, you would not care.

      • Anonymous

        I want to eliminate dangerous developments that aren’t needed for any other reason than to feed the voracious and truly sociopathic appetite for ever greater wealth exhibited by the typical large corporation. Searsport has almost nothing to gain and a great deal to lose as a result of Big Tank. Ditto for Maine. 

        As for that tired NIMBY “argument” — which is more a foolish jeer — the DCP executives present last Thursday at the company’s would-be dog-and-pony show in Searsport were challenged, as you should be, to ask themselves whether they really would want to live in a community threatened with the kind of development Searsport is. They were all strangely silent on that one.    

    • Anonymous

      Didn’t you forget to mention the hundreds of fuel oil and gasoline tanker trucks that already regularly transit your pristine town?  The likelyhood of a gasoline tanker truck involved in an accident and exploding is far greater than a propane truck. 
      Once again, you’re a perfect example of stopping Maine from progressing into the 21st century and denying much needed jobs in the area.

    • Guest

      Sometimes….

      I get the feeling you spend most of your time quivering in fear of things that might, possibly, sometimes, occasionally, happen.

      How can you possibly get in a car?  Or own one or let one within hundreds of feet of your house?   Don’t you know that 1 gallon of gas contains the energy of 60 sticks of dynamite?   Most cars contain at least 10 gallons of gas.  That would be 600 sticks of dynamite!!!!   And some cars  have gas tanks that hold 20 ot even 30 gallons of gas!!!

      Horrors!!!!

    • Anonymous

      You’re absolutely right! This should not be taken lightly.
      Although I wasn’t living there when this horrible fuel truck crash happened, I did rent an apartment about 200 feet from the accident site a few years prior -http://www.nytimes.com/1994/07/28/nyregion/explosion-on-i-287-the-overview-tanker-crashes-in-a-fiery-blast-in-westchester.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

  • Anonymous

    Not trying to be critical but it’s a tractor trailer load of paper that crashed and burned .  The propane truck is a separate vehicle and is not involved in the fire but it did overturn and is close-by.

    If your stories continue to be as inaccurate as this, will you be in need of someone to call your dog for you when you want him to come inside?

  • Anonymous

    Perhaps if the State DOT would allow the local DOT workers take care of that stretch of road like they used to in years past. This wouldn’t have happened. Beddington used to be one section you could depend on getting through even with Schoppie Hill. Aurora on the other hand were always the last responders to ice and snow. They usually didn’t come out until there was at least one accident.

  • Anonymous

    It is not just the (not insignificant) risk of 300 propane trucks a day on our icy streets all winter it about the quality of our lives in our town of Searsport. It’s about the threat to the tourism,  a major driver of our economy. It’s about the traffic rerouted by AAA up 95 to Bar Harbor because of the traffic in Searsport.
      Like you wouldn’t be the first to complain if it were in your back yard.It’s in my town.  I won’t see it I won’t hear it but it will hurt my town, our tax base, my taxes.

    • Anonymous

      First of all you should all get your facts straight. DCP plans are for no more than 50 tankers per day during peak demand and 5 tankers per day max during the summer time. Don’t mistake their permit for the actual facts.

  • Anonymous

    It is not just the (not insignificant) risk of 300 propane trucks a day on our icy streets all winter it about the quality of our lives in our town of Searsport. It’s about the threat to the tourism,  a major driver of our economy. It’s about the traffic rerouted by AAA up 95 to Bar Harbor because of the traffic in Searsport.
      Like you wouldn’t be the first to complain if it were in your back yard.It’s in my town.  I won’t see it I won’t hear it but it will hurt my town, our tax base, my taxes.

    • Um, have you noticed the traffic on RT1 in tourist season? Do you think a few trucks is going to make a difference?

    • Anonymous

      dont forget all the LNG, methane, acid, caustic, chlorate ,Gasoline, heating oil, kerosene trucks .  How many of those ?  Id move

    • Anonymous

      I think we should put the propane tank in bar harbor then it wont hurt your toursim lets see what bar harbor has to say

  • Anonymous

    This can’t be blame on a teenage driver

  • Anonymous

    Ok, you all done taking shots at each other? Here’s the main thing you all seemed to overlook– both drivers are alive, with only minor injuries! To busy tootin’ your own horn, beating your own drum, you’ve disregarded the best news- the families have their husbands/fathers coming home, NOT a state trooper knocking at their door with bad news. And to slow down the negative people–my apologies if it didn’t read wife/mother in this age! I’m just glad  the drivers are safe!

  • Anonymous

    Super Petey to the rescue…LOL..

  • Anonymous

             I read with
    amusement Peter Tabers’ comments on his distain for DCP Midstream’s’ plans to
    build a propane terminal in Searsport.

            He
    states,”he wants to eliminate dangerous developments that aren’t needed
    for any other reason than to feed the voracious and truly sociopathic appetite
    for ever greater wealth exhibited by the typical large corporation. Searsport
    has almost nothing to gain and a great deal to lose.”

           It’s quite
    evident by that statement that Mr. Taber’s has an agenda. 
    Unfortunately, Mr. Taber’s personal issues with large corporations is delaying
    the opportunity for Searsport to increase its tax base,  provide over
    one hundred positions to local residents in the construction of the
    terminal, and upon the completion of the terminal provide high paying 
    jobs with exceptional benefits to area citizens.

          I’d also
    like to suggest that Mr. Taber redo his math. He states that the traffic
    on Rt 1 in Searsport would increase by 30 percent because of the 300
    trucks a day using the DCP terminal.  DCP representatives stated
    there would be 50 tanker trucks a day. Maine DOT has said that an average of
    10000 vehicles a day drive on that stretch of RT 1. The actual increase in
    traffic would be .005 percent. That is a far cry from 30 percent.

         Finally, when
    all else fails scare them. And Mr. Taber makes a valiant attempt to scare the
    heck out of the citizens of Searsport. The reality is that the trucks that
    transport the propane are designed with safety features that protect the
    public in even the worst scenario. There are thousands of homes throughout
    the state of Maine
    that heat with propane, myself included. Am I supposed to go cold because
    there is a slight chance something may happen? Every week I read about fires
    caused by woodstoves. I can’t think of the last time I read about a fire caused
    by propane.

         I appreciate
    Mr. Taber wanting to keep Searsport in the twentieth century. However, we are
    in the twenty-first century and we need jobs.

     

    • Anonymous

      Strawman arguments are easy to make but by definition, whether deliberately or as a result of confused thinking or reading difficulties, they entirely miss the point. 

      Go back and read my post and maybe you’ll realize I never said traffic on Route 1 would increase by 30 percent. Using the company’s own traffic projection figures in its permit application to the Maine DEP and knowing existing tanker truck movements into and out of Mack Point, I made a straightforward calculation. This is what I wrote: “…DCP Midstream has made public it intends to increase tanker truck traffic in and out of Mack Point accessing already crowded Route 1 by some 30 percent.” Got that, “in and out of Mack Point…by some 30 percent”?

      I made a statement about the nature of large for-profit corporate entities. If this means I have an “agenda,” so be it. I don’t see how that detracts from the truth of what I said nor why that gives truth to your statement about all the wonderful jobs you claim I’m standing in the way of. 

      The facts are there are many times more existing jobs in Searsport that would be at risk if this propane terminal development comes about than the 8 to 12 or 10 to 13 or 13 to 15 (it keeps changing all the time) jobs DCP claims they’ll bring. So far, we’re not really an industrial town and most of us don’t want to turn into one —  for personal reasons, for aesthetic reasons and, perhaps above all, for ECONOMIC reasons. 

      We want to hold onto the many jobs we already have, not see them disappear in return for a handful of promised new ones in an industry incompatible with what for most of us is a desirable way of life, for jobs there is emphatically no guarantee people who live in the Searsport area would even get.

      We want to be able to see continuing prosperity for our existing businesses, most of which are in some way related to the tourist industry and to the Maine brand way of life, those small businesses which have long been in a position to pick up about twice as much of the local tax base as the three big foreign-based multi-national corporations at Mack Point put together and which in contrast with big business from outside the area invest their profits in the community for the benefit of the community.

      We want to be able to believe that our investments in our businesses and home properties will remain protected, that those businesses won’t necessarily wither and die as Searsport turns into a sloppy imitation of Bayonne, N.J., that our homes won’t drop 20 or 30 percent in value or even become unsaleable as consultants projected when a similar LNG terminal was threatened in 2003.

      Finally, we want some real measure of security — from the very real threat of easy terrorist attack, of course, for which no effective counter-measures are at present even seriously contemplated, but also for our lives as we drive and for the lives of our children as they ride in schoolbuses each day on a busy Route 1 that during the iciest time of year would find an additional tanker truck filled with some 10,000 gallons of highly volatile fuel turning into or out of about once every five minutes around the clock. 

  • good thing no one farted

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