December 16, 2017
Midcoast Latest News | Poll Questions | Net Neutrality | Robert Burton | Opioid Epidemic

Comments for: Family’s pet pit bull attacks two in Waldoboro

Guidelines for posting on bangordailynews.com

The Bangor Daily News and the Bangor Publishing Co. encourage comments about stories, but you must follow our terms of service.

  1. Keep it civil and stay on topic
  2. No vulgarity, racial slurs, name-calling or personal attacks.
  3. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked.
The primary rule here is pretty simple: Treat others with the same respect you'd want for yourself. Here are some guidelines (see more):

  • DonHorchKingofMen

    Waiting..Waiting for the “deed not breed” folks to come out of the cellar…Poor kids,hope this dosent affect their having pets as they grow up…

  • Guest

    What I like about these stories is hearing about what great pets these breeds are.  Let it start.

    • Anonymous

      Ill start it for you (Oh it must be the owners fault, they are so loving and faithfull) Junk yard dogs.

      • Anonymous

        There are no bad dogs, only bad owners. If the trailer trash tough guy wannabe gangstas could get their brains off drugs long enough to think about anything at all, they wouldn’t be “training” their pets to be killers. You don’t blame the guy’s car when some idiot smashes into you.

    • Guest

       Yeah, the media is so biased towards these gentle, loving Terriers.  They won’t even report it when a Collie tears a child’s face off.  *NOTE SARCASM*

    • Anonymous

      I know of three dog bites in the Bangor area since November of 2011 that did not involve a “pit bull” and were never reported in the BDN.

      One bite included a “neck” bite (which is considered a kill bite) and the other dog bit two different people on two different days. The second bite was while the dog was under “home quarantine” for the first bite.

  • Anonymous

    My wife’s Shit-zu bit me yesterday.  I should call the local media.

    • Anonymous

      It would be a story if the Shit-zu ripped half your face off or attacked two kids requiring them to be taken to the hospital.

      • Kim

        My mothers Cocker Spaniel not only tore her lip open but the little bugger did it to my brother as well, completely unprovoked. Needless to say that dog got himself a one way trip to the vet. ANY dog can bite at will, being bitten by a dog is not specific to any particular breed. Educate yourselves folks!

        • Anonymous

          The cocker spaniel will release their jaws easily in comparison to the pit bull. Pit bulls really lock them on and having been bred to protect the stash or fight, they keep them locked on.

           

          • Anonymous

            Pitbulls can not “lock their jaw” as people have been led to believe.

          • Anonymous

            Perhaps I used the term “locked on” in a way to make you believe that they could lock their jaws. I used it almost like the term is used with respect to braking. Anyway, I agree they can’t lock their jaws but their jaw muscles are much stronger by muscular design than many other dog breeds which is true of almost all bull-dog type breeds. It is also true that spaniels release more easily. Think of how spaniels are bred and for what purpose and then think of how pit bulls were bred over the past 30 years and for what purposes. Breeding/lineage/genetics makes a huge difference.

            People tend to trust their pets and should not trust them around their small kids. Dogs are adults of their species and some have better temperaments than others. One day every one of them can be having a bad day regardless of their usual temperament—-then they lash out. Gee, I recall Roy Horn being grabbed and shaken by the back of the neck and dragged off the stage. The crap handed out about the tiger defending him was pure bull. You can’t get the wild out of wild animals no matter how you treat them like your little pets. He believed that because he rode it and played with it, it was tame and the wild was bred out of it. One day it had enough and it tried to kill him and dragging him off was akin to taking him to a safe spot for another purpose. These dogs bred to fight and protect/guard are more easily provoked into asserting their strength and dominance. Occasionally, there are dogs which are aggressive—as there are some people who are more aggressive. No one bred it into them, it just exists. Having been around animals all my life, I have seen such tendencies as a part of nature.

            Keep kids away from larger dogs and dogs possessing strength. Be careful of the breeder from whom you purchase dogs. Yes, all dogs can and do bite and some attack viciously. 

          • Kim

            Why don’t you try reading about the history of the pit bull or “Nanny dog” as they used to be called if you want to know why people started breeding them years ago.

          • Anonymous

            You might try reading about how they were bred to protect drug stashes and how they are used in fighting. You do know about how to breed certain traits, don’t you?

          • Anonymous

            And Rotties, GSD, Doberman’s, etc…have all been breed at one time or another to do the same thing.

          • Anonymous

            True. Dogs are bred to bring about a desired trait and the best at that trait provide the necessary genes to insure it. I don’t dispute that other breeds have been bred for aggressive tendencise.

          • Anonymous

            Pit Bulls were bred to bait bear and bulls – thence the name “Pit Bull”.  They also “lock” their jaws or whatever word you want to use and will not let go.  That is what they were bred to do.

            These are not bad dogs, but they are very bad pets.  That’s just the way it is.

          • Anonymous

            “Pit Bulls” do not have jaws that “lock”. That is a myth.

          • Anonymous

            They may not be able to “lock: their jaws, but they have an incredible amount of jaw strength. I have hog hunting buddies down south who use pits, and they all carry a wedge shaped piece of wood in case the pit latches onto them in the fray. They slide the wedge into the jaw near the joint and rotate it to open the pits mouth. At the first sign of real aggression toward humans they put the dog down on the spot. These dogs are simply to powerful to keep if they are not 100% trustworthy. Of course replacement pits for them are easy, the pounds down south are full of them (and becoming more so up here). Every wannabe “gangster” has to have a pit.

          • Anonymous

            Here are the facts about dog bite strength.

            Dr. Brady Barr of the National Geographic show Dangerous Encounters: Bite Force (2007) measured the bite strength of several different creatures including the American Pit Bull, German Shepherd Dog and Rottweiler. The average bite strength as measured by a bite sleeve was 269 pounds with the Rottweiler topping out at 328 pounds.

            and

            In the Journal of Anatomy in 2009, Dr. Ellis demonstrated that the size of the animal and the shape of its own jaw predicted bite strength. The larger the dog and the dog’s head, and the wider the jaw, the higher the bite force turned out to be. The winner? Mastiff at 552 pounds which is just short of the force of a lions bite.

          • Anonymous

            You obviously have done your research. I guess the tenacity of pit bulls makes up for the difference if bite force. When a pit is on a hog it will not let go, ideally you have a pit on the hogs nose and one on the hibquarters, 2 pits in this configuration can immobilize a 150lb hog. Some of the guys I’ve hunted with knock the pig over and stick it with a knife rather than shoot it (I’m not that foolhardy). They are only able to accomplish that with the aid of the pits on the hog.

          • Anonymous

            And the shelter’s in the south are full of ALL types and sizes of ALL dogs. That is why the kill rate in many shelters in the south is 20-25 animals (horses, cats, dogs, etc…) per DAY.

          • Jason Fraser

            No, but they are bred to bite, hang on, tear and shake until their victim stops moving and that’s what they do!

          • OldWench

            Not quite…they were bred to bait BULLS while also being loyal and NOT aggressive to people.  This dog probably isn’t even a genuine APBT, either.  It’s more likely a mix or an American Bulldog.  

          • Anonymous

            I doubt it was an American Bulldog, big difference between a Bulldog and Pit Bull.  I am not 100% sure, but American Bulldogs are rather tame, actually the two that I know are pretty lazy.  They like to chase a ball or gnaw on a bone from time to time, but more often then not they prefer to sleep.

          • OldWench

            Tell that to the woman who was almost killed by one not too long ago.

          • that women was attacked by a bull dog  NOT a pittbull

          • Anonymous

            I thought that was a Bull Mastif.

          • OldWench

            Nope…it was an American Bulldog.  

          • OldWench

            That’s what I said…an American Bulldog, to be specific, which is NOT an APBT.

          • This is not completely true i actually feel offended by this is you do not know that much about this breed then do your home work!! yes they are bred for some of it but they are not just for that. They are not bred to bite, hang on yes. but they are a breed that people need to do research on expecially if you are thinking about owning one which I have one sand getting a new lil grl from the shelter to give her a better life!

          • Anonymous

            Gameness trait of all bulldog/terrier breeds. Comes in very handy for search and rescue, especially since pitties are the most capable canine climbers. 4 pits were used for 9/11 rescue. They are working dogs. They cannot lock there jaws, but they can hold on pretty good. Fun playing tug-o-war with pitties. But, they are less likely to attack a human in comparison to a lab.

          • Anonymous

            All dogs are capable of attacking.

            Perhaps I used the term “locked on” in a way to make you believe
            that they could lock their jaws. I used it almost like the term is used
            with respect to braking. Anyway, I agree they can’t lock their jaws but
            their jaw muscles are much stronger by muscular design than many other
            dog breeds which is true of almost all bull-dog type breeds. It is also
            true that spaniels release more easily. Think of how spaniels are bred
            and for what purpose and then think of how pit bulls were bred over the
            past 30 years and for what purposes. Breeding/lineage/genetics makes a
            huge difference.People tend to trust their pets and should not
            trust them around their small kids. Dogs are adults of their species and
            some have better temperaments than others. One day every one of them
            can be having a bad day regardless of their usual temperament—-then
            they lash out. Gee, I recall Roy Horn being grabbed and shaken by the
            back of the neck and dragged off the stage. The crap handed out about
            the tiger defending him was pure bull. You can’t get the wild out of
            wild animals no matter how you treat them like your little pets. He
            believed that because he rode it and played with it, it was tame and the
            wild was bred out of it. One day it had enough and it tried to kill him
            and dragging him off was akin to taking him to a safe spot for another
            purpose. These dogs bred to fight and protect/guard are more easily
            provoked into asserting their strength and dominance. Occasionally,
            there are dogs which are aggressive—as there are some people who are
            more aggressive. No one bred it into them, it just exists. Having been
            around animals all my life, I have seen such tendencies as a part of
            nature.Keep kids away from larger dogs and dogs possessing
            strength. Be careful of the breeder from whom you purchase dogs. Yes,
            all dogs can and do bite and some attack viciously.

          • Anonymous

            thats awesome… pit bulls are such god dogs with good owners and there the best trail dogs.. but  like all dogs love, time spent, and good surroundings “exercise”.. are what they need …verdict owners fault ..

          • LDR

            seriously?? In compared to a lab?  I’d be curious to see where those statistics were compiled.

          • Tracy Caraker

            That is totally bogus. You should research the breed before you start spouting myths like this.

          • Anonymous

            Tracy, go back and read the replies I already made. Oh, no, you passed it by several times and totally ignored it. Read on—I cut and pasted it for all who refuse to read carefully–
            You only know what you choose to know. Expand your horizons. Myths have no basis in fact. It is a known fact that some dogs are bred for certain traits. Some dogs bred to fight don’t make it and are put down and only dogs who show the trait desired are then bred. Same thing with thoroughbreds—big bucks are paid for the sperm of the good ones who don’t field breed—the semen is collected and used for artificial insemination at the farm. Same thing for certain breeds of cattle. Come on —you must know about this—
            Perhaps I used the term “locked on” in a way to make you believe
            that they could lock their jaws. I used it almost like the term is used
            with respect to braking. Anyway, I agree they can’t lock their jaws but
            their jaw muscles are much stronger by muscular design than many other
            dog breeds which is true of almost all bull-dog type breeds. It is also
            true that spaniels release more easily. Think of how spaniels are bred
            and for what purpose and then think of how pit bulls were bred over the
            past 30 years and for what purposes. Breeding/lineage/genetics makes a
            huge difference.

            People tend to trust their pets and should not
            trust them around their small kids. Dogs are adults of their species and
            some have better temperaments than others. One day every one of them
            can be having a bad day regardless of their usual temperament—-then
            they lash out. Gee, I recall Roy Horn being grabbed and shaken by the
            back of the neck and dragged off the stage. The crap handed out about
            the tiger defending him was pure bull. You can’t get the wild out of
            wild animals no matter how you treat them like your little pets. He
            believed that because he rode it and played with it, it was tame and the
            wild was bred out of it. One day it had enough and it tried to kill him
            and dragging him off was akin to taking him to a safe spot for another
            purpose. These dogs bred to fight and protect/guard are more easily
            provoked into asserting their strength and dominance. Occasionally,
            there are dogs which are aggressive—as there are some people who are
            more aggressive. No one bred it into them, it just exists. Having been
            around animals all my life, I have seen such tendencies as a part of
            nature.

            Keep kids away from larger dogs and dogs possessing
            strength. Be careful of the breeder from whom you purchase dogs. Yes,
            all dogs can and do bite and some attack viciously.

          • OldWench

            Pit bulls do NOT “lock” their jaws.  The second someone makes this claim I know that they have no clue what they are talking about.  I’ve had several pit bulls over the years and I know A LOT about the breed.  Their jaws don’t lock.  They simply bite differently than most breeds of dog.  They do not make multiple random bites.  They bite and hold on and shake. That is why they tend to cause a lot more damage when they do bite.  The reason they bite is usually significantly different as well.  They generally only bite to protect their owner or defend themselves from a perceived threat…UNLESS it’s another animal where they can sometimes be “gamey” or animal aggressive.

          • Anonymous

            I posted this same comment to two others who took my comment too literally. You have no clue about how to comprehend comments not did you care to look at the replies I had already made. Some of us do know about this breed as well as other breeds.
            Perhaps I used the term “locked on” in a way to make you believe
            that they could lock their jaws. I used it almost like the term is used
            with respect to braking. Anyway, I agree they can’t lock their jaws but
            their jaw muscles are much stronger by muscular design than many other
            dog breeds which is true of almost all bull-dog type breeds. It is also
            true that spaniels release more easily. Think of how spaniels are bred
            and for what purpose and then think of how pit bulls were bred over the
            past 30 years and for what purposes. Breeding/lineage/genetics makes a
            huge difference.People tend to trust their pets and should not
            trust them around their small kids. Dogs are adults of their species and
            some have better temperaments than others. One day every one of them
            can be having a bad day regardless of their usual temperament—-then
            they lash out. Gee, I recall Roy Horn being grabbed and shaken by the
            back of the neck and dragged off the stage. The crap handed out about
            the tiger defending him was pure bull. You can’t get the wild out of
            wild animals no matter how you treat them like your little pets. He
            believed that because he rode it and played with it, it was tame and the
            wild was bred out of it. One day it had enough and it tried to kill him
            and dragging him off was akin to taking him to a safe spot for another
            purpose. These dogs bred to fight and protect/guard are more easily
            provoked into asserting their strength and dominance. Occasionally,
            there are dogs which are aggressive—as there are some people who are
            more aggressive. No one bred it into them, it just exists. Having been
            around animals all my life, I have seen such tendencies as a part of
            nature.Keep kids away from larger dogs and dogs possessing
            strength. Be careful of the breeder from whom you purchase dogs. Yes,
            all dogs can and do bite and some attack viciously.

          • i just want to let everyone know that a pit bulls jaw really does not lock that they just have strong jaw muscles. I am doing an essay on them for college. So I have to get the facts. But I also own a pit and I am getting another one. My lil boy is a mommas boy would not hurt a fly his best frind is a cat lol. But I also have to say if it was any other dog it would not have made the news!!!

          • Anonymous

            Look at the replies I had already made.
            Some of us do know about this breed as well as other breeds.

            Perhaps I used the term “locked on” in a way to make you believe
            that they could lock their jaws. I used it almost like the term is used
            with respect to braking. Anyway, I agree they can’t lock their jaws but
            their jaw muscles are much stronger by muscular design than many other
            dog breeds which is true of almost all bull-dog type breeds. It is also
            true that spaniels release more easily. Think of how spaniels are bred
            and for what purpose and then think of how pit bulls were bred over the
            past 30 years and for what purposes. Breeding/lineage/genetics makes a
            huge difference.People tend to trust their pets and should not
            trust them around their small kids. Dogs are adults of their species and
            some have better temperaments than others. One day every one of them
            can be having a bad day regardless of their usual temperament—-then
            they lash out. Gee, I recall Roy Horn being grabbed and shaken by the
            back of the neck and dragged off the stage. The crap handed out about
            the tiger defending him was pure bull. You can’t get the wild out of
            wild animals no matter how you treat them like your little pets. He
            believed that because he rode it and played with it, it was tame and the
            wild was bred out of it. One day it had enough and it tried to kill him
            and dragging him off was akin to taking him to a safe spot for another
            purpose. These dogs bred to fight and protect/guard are more easily
            provoked into asserting their strength and dominance. Occasionally,
            there are dogs which are aggressive—as there are some people who are
            more aggressive. No one bred it into them, it just exists. Having been
            around animals all my life, I have seen such tendencies as a part of
            nature.Keep kids away from larger dogs and dogs possessing
            strength. Be careful of the breeder from whom you purchase dogs. Yes,
            all dogs can and do bite and some attack viciously. Flag

          • Anonymous

            THEY SHOULD OUTLAW THESE DOGS AROUND CHILDREN I SAY !!!!

          • Anonymous

            And the only fatal dog attack in Maine in recent memory involved a Rottie. Maybe we should ban those dogs instead. What do you think 0flower0?

          • Anonymous

            gambler16 “pit bulls” do not lock their jaws. It is an urban legend that they do and it seems that the myth has been perpetrated thanks to the internet.

          • Anonymous

            You passed other comments I made and probably should have read them. Look at the replies I had already made.
            Some of us do know about this breed as well as other breeds.

            Perhaps I used the term “locked on” in a way to make you believe
            that they could lock their jaws. I used it almost like the term is used
            with respect to braking. Anyway, I agree they can’t lock their jaws but
            their jaw muscles are much stronger by muscular design than many other
            dog breeds which is true of almost all bull-dog type breeds. It is also
            true that spaniels release more easily. Think of how spaniels are bred
            and for what purpose and then think of how pit bulls were bred over the
            past 30 years and for what purposes. Breeding/lineage/genetics makes a
            huge difference.People tend to trust their pets and should not
            trust them around their small kids. Dogs are adults of their species and
            some have better temperaments than others. One day every one of them
            can be having a bad day regardless of their usual temperament—-then
            they lash out. Gee, I recall Roy Horn being grabbed and shaken by the
            back of the neck and dragged off the stage. The crap handed out about
            the tiger defending him was pure bull. You can’t get the wild out of
            wild animals no matter how you treat them like your little pets. He
            believed that because he rode it and played with it, it was tame and the
            wild was bred out of it. One day it had enough and it tried to kill him
            and dragging him off was akin to taking him to a safe spot for another
            purpose. These dogs bred to fight and protect/guard are more easily
            provoked into asserting their strength and dominance. Occasionally,
            there are dogs which are aggressive—as there are some people who are
            more aggressive. No one bred it into them, it just exists. Having been
            around animals all my life, I have seen such tendencies as a part of
            nature.Keep kids away from larger dogs and dogs possessing
            strength. Be careful of the breeder from whom you purchase dogs. Yes,
            all dogs can and do bite and some attack viciously. Flag

        • Jason Fraser

          Any dog that bites, or even threatens to bite, me or any member of my family — or anyone else when I’m around — gets a one-way trip to a hole in the ground! Yes, any dog can bite, but when a pit bull bites, someone usually ends up badly injured or dead. Comparing the bite of a Cocker spaniel to that of a pit bull is equivalent to comparing a firecracker to a stick of dynamite!

          • Anonymous

            I posted this same comment to two others who took my comment too
            literally. You have no clue about how to comprehend comments not did
            you care to look at the replies I had already made. Some of us do know
            about this breed as well as other breeds.

            Perhaps I used the term “locked on” in a way to make you believe
            that they could lock their jaws. I used it almost like the term is used
            with respect to braking. Anyway, I agree they can’t lock their jaws but
            their jaw muscles are much stronger by muscular design than many other
            dog breeds which is true of almost all bull-dog type breeds. It is also
            true that spaniels release more easily. Think of how spaniels are bred
            and for what purpose and then think of how pit bulls were bred over the
            past 30 years and for what purposes. Breeding/lineage/genetics makes a
            huge difference.People tend to trust their pets and should not
            trust them around their small kids. Dogs are adults of their species and
            some have better temperaments than others. One day every one of them
            can be having a bad day regardless of their usual temperament—-then
            they lash out. Gee, I recall Roy Horn being grabbed and shaken by the
            back of the neck and dragged off the stage. The crap handed out about
            the tiger defending him was pure bull. You can’t get the wild out of
            wild animals no matter how you treat them like your little pets. He
            believed that because he rode it and played with it, it was tame and the
            wild was bred out of it. One day it had enough and it tried to kill him
            and dragging him off was akin to taking him to a safe spot for another
            purpose. These dogs bred to fight and protect/guard are more easily
            provoked into asserting their strength and dominance. Occasionally,
            there are dogs which are aggressive—as there are some people who are
            more aggressive. No one bred it into them, it just exists. Having been
            around animals all my life, I have seen such tendencies as a part of
            nature.Keep kids away from larger dogs and dogs possessing
            strength. Be careful of the breeder from whom you purchase dogs. Yes,
            all dogs can and do bite and some attack viciously. 

        • Anonymous

          I’ve educated myself Kim, now I will educate you: 

          From dogbite.org

          2011 statistics
          31 U.S. fatal dog attacks occurred in 2011. Despite being regulated in Military Housing areas and over 650 U.S. cities, pit bulls led these attacks accounting for 71% (22). Pit bulls make up less than 5% of the total U.S. dog population.2Notably in 2011, adult victims of fatal pit bull attacks more than doubled the number of child victims. Of the 22 total pit bull victims, 68% (15) fell between the ages of 32 to 76, and 32% (7) were ages 5 years and younger. The year 2011 also marks an increase in pet pit bulls killing their owners. Of the 8 total instances this year in which a family dog inflicted fatal injury to its primary caretaker, the dog’s owner, 88% (7) involved pet pit bulls.Together, pit bulls (22) and rottweilers (4), the number two lethal dog breed, accounted for 84% of all fatal attacks in 2011. In the 7-year period from 2005 to 2011, this same combination accounted for 73% (156) of the total recorded deaths (213).The breakdown between pit bulls and rottweilers is substantial over this 7-year period. From 2005 to 2011, pit bulls killed 127 Americans,3 about one citizen every 20 days, versus rottweilers, which killed 29; about one citizen every 88 days.Annual data from 2011 shows that 58% (18) of the attacks occurred to adults (21 years and older) and 42% (13) occurred to children (11 years and younger). Of the children, 62% (8) occurred to ages 1 and younger. 2011 data also shows that 39% (12) of the fatal incidents involved more than one dog; 26% (8) involved breeding on the dog owner’s property either actively or in the recent past, and 6% (2) involved tethered dogs, down from 9% in 2010 and 19% in 2009.Dog ownership information for 2011 shows that family dogs comprised 65% (20) of the attacks that resulted in death; 74% (23) of all incidents occurred on the dog owner’s property and 29% (9) resulted in criminal charges, up from 15% in 2010.The states of California and Texas led fatalities in 2011, each with 4 deaths; pit bulls and their mixes contributed to 88% (7) of the 8 deaths. North Carolina, New Mexico, South Carolina and Virginia each incurred 2 deaths.See: Full news release.
          2011 U.S. dog bite fatalities2011 fatal dog attacks by breed
          In 2011, one fatality involved dogs from up to four different dog breeds,4 thus producing a “death credit” total of 33 rather than 31. Up to seven dog breeds contributed to one death: Alaskan malamute, American bulldog, “bulldog” (American or English not specified), cane corso, doberman pinscher, German shepherd and Japanese akita.

          • Anonymous

            “The year 2011 also marks an increase in pet pit bulls killing their
            owners. Of the 8 total instances this year in which a family dog
            inflicted fatal injury to its primary caretaker, the dog’s owner, 88%
            (7) involved pet pit bulls.”

            Now there’s a little glimmer of hope. Fewer pit bull owners, fewer pit bulls…

          • Anonymous

            Pitbulls do not kill their owners for no reason. If people beat their animals the animal may turn on them. It is all how they are raised!!

          • and let me educate you. almost all dogs identified as pit bulls are NOT in fact pit bulls. Here is an example: http://network.bestfriends.org/2045/news.aspx

            another example of pit bull myths: http://www.understand-a-bull.com/PitbullInformation/Urbanlegends.htm

            there was a study done several years ago that tested dog catchers on their identification prowess and something like 90% of of the dog catchers got 70% of the identifications wrong and all of them misidentified these dogs as pit bulls. There are over 20 breeds that are misidentified as pit bulls. I think from now on ALL dogs that bite should have a genetic test to identify what type they are to end all these crap about pit bulls being the culprit all the time.

          • Anonymous

            Before you start quoting statistics you need to understand that breed identification in dog bite cases is almost always, without exception wrong. Even when relying in shelters, pounds, etc…as the “source” they are often wrong.

          • Anonymous

            The site even has a page with a lawyer directory! I wonder if lawyers set up the site specifically trolling for dog bit cases?

          • Anonymous

            They wouldn’t possibly do that, would they?  (note the dripping sarcasm)

          • Anonymous

            The site you quote, dogsbite.org (with an S ) says it is specifically set up as an anti-pit pull site. http://www.dogsbite.org/dogsbite-about.php  Of course it will give you the statistics you desire for an anti-pit bull argument. Just like a GOP site would give you want you need for an anti-Dem argument or a right to life site would give you for an anti-abortion argument. How about looking for a non-advocate, fair and balanced (not in the Fox news sense) site for your statistics?

          • Anonymous

            Shoot em all. If one bites anyone for any reason, put the owner in jail and make em pay big bucks.

        • Well said!

      • Anonymous

        So because Oreo’s mouth isnt big, it’s not media-worthy.  My stepson got bit a few years ago while riding his bike through town.  It was a golden lab owned by the ambulance chief here in town.  Left a nice bite mark on his backside. No media coverage there either.

        • Anonymous

          i commented above, but there is a big difference between a bite and mauling.  

          • Anonymous

            I re-read the story and didn’t see the word “maul” anywhere.  The injuries were not considered life threatening.  Probably not much more than, “holy crap, the dog bit me.”  I’m not sure of course, but i’m hoping thats what it was.  I also hope both of these kids are gonna be okay.

        • Anonymous

          Don’t follow the news much, do you.
          Give it a try.

        • this one got the coverage because it was a pit and it is the media that gives this breed such a bad name!!!

    • Anonymous

      big difference between ‘bite’ and ‘maul’.  in this case, probably about 65 lbs difference.  

    • Jason Fraser

      Did the imaginary bite by your wife’s Shit-zu require treatment at the scene followed by and to a hospital?

  • Anonymous

    Prove it was a “Pit Bull”  There are 20+ breeds of dogs out there that people mistake for a Pit.  I’ll admit it, I took a breed identification test and I wasn’t even close when asked to pick the Pit. I’m guessing that most people would also fail the same test.  I’ll try to find the link to the test and post it on here if there is anyone here open-minded enough to take it.

    EDIT: found the link. Take a minute and take the test honestly. Dont just reply saying you picked out the pitbull first try. Take the test and then reply.

    http://www.pitbullsontheweb.com/petbull/findpit.html

    • Anonymous

      That was interesting…thanks for posting…it took me 5 guesses, so I guess I would fail the “quick glance” test myself…

      • Anonymous

        Alot of people would.  It took me alot more than 5 guesses to get it right.

    • Anonymous

      I picked it first time, but I have worked with animals for years, a everyday person couldnt and thats why pits get a bad rap
      also here is a list of bites by breed hmmmmm guess who bites more……….LABS!
      http://indigorescue.org/?page_id=83

      • Michelle McCoy

        I know your trying to make a point here but I have a LAB and she is AWESOME. She doesn’t bite. I dont think it matters what kind of dog it is anyone of them can bite to harm others.  

      • Guest

         I read the artical, Labs are shown as dead last in biting anyone at 1%. Where did you get your info from?

        • Anonymous

          All dogs bite approximately at the same, and labs bite the more, simply because there are more of them. Pit bulls seem to bite a lot, if you are a hearsay learner, but the fact remains, there are tons of pit bulls, pit bulls account for a multitude of breeds, and when we refer to pit bulls, we are lumping many, many breeds, including mutts together. So of course the number would seem higher, but it is not. Rarely do we here of an attack from a purebred pit bull. Just doesn’t happen all that often, hence the reason why the newspaper uses the very generic term “Pit Bull.”

          • Guest

             Huh? I just commented on what that “Study” reported.

          • OldWench

            No…there is only ONE pit bull…it is the American Pit Bull Terrier or APBT for short.  There is one other breed that is very close and some experts consider them to be the same breed and that is the Staffordshire Terrier.  There are many bull breeds of dog, but the ONLY dog with “pit bull” in it’s name is the American Pit Bull Terrier.  If those documenting these attacks had to produce papers to prove the breed of the dog the pit bull would have one of the lowest attack percentages on the list because they were specifically bred NOT to be aggressive towards people.  

        • Anonymous

          My lab was way more vicious than my pitbull!!!!!!

    • Guest

        Took me three tries to get it (#17), But the test people say 20, not 50+ mistaken for pitbull, FYI.

      • Anonymous

        Was it not #16?

        • Guest

            You are right, it is 16. Mistakes are what happen when you don’t take your time, Thanks for the correction

      • Anonymous

        you’re right. I thought it was 50 but i’ll change it now.

    • OldWench

      I was able to pick it out on the first try…but I had my first pit over 20 years ago.

    • Anonymous

      i have a great pitbull mix and i took the test and didnt pick out the correct one.  Mine has been mistaken for several times as a black lab.  *He thinks he is a cat and has 4 best buddies to prove it.  He is so laid back I can take food from him and he waits for the cats to finish eating his food before he will start.  Bad people create bad dogs no matter what breed. 

  • first american pet, great dogs, PERFECT PETS… AND formskin….THIS IS THE OWNERS FAULT!

  • “There is no such thing as a problem breed. However, there is no shortage of ‘problem owners’….” 
    ― Cesar Millan, Cesar’s Way: The Natural, Everyday Guide to Understanding and Correcting Common Dog Problems

    • “My kids are around pit bulls every day. In the ’70s they blamed Dobermans, in the ’80s they blamed German shepherds, in the ’90s they blamed the Rottweiler. Now they blame the pit bull.”
      Cesar Millan
      When are they going to blame the owner, not the breed?

  • Anonymous

    How many more, Mr. Speakah!

    • DonHorchKingofMen

       Wonderful!

      • Anonymous

        it WOULD be the deed, not the breed. The same as with humans or anything else. And you obviously have no respect for others with the comment about living in the cellar. Why is it you feel you have the right to run others down for having a different opinion than your own? Too bad you cant seem to have an opinion without it – it might actually be an interesting debate!

  • Anonymous

    Queue the pitbull defenders.

    However, maybe they’re on to something: Are those breeds of dogs no more dangerous than other breeds, but a common overlap exists between pitbull owners and irresponsible people?

    • mdiresident

      Actually, I DO think there is a correlation there.  You’re right.

  • Anonymous

    The notion that one breed of dog is not more aggresive than another breed is absurd.Of course there are different levels of aggresion in different breeds,the same as there are different levels in the same breed.You can tell me all about labs that have bitten,or poodles or whatever. But you are NOT going to tell me it happens with the frequency of Pits. Not to mention the horrific cases where someone is killed!

    • Anonymous

      Some of them are bred to fight—some are bred to protect a stash. If the breeder is looking for a certain trait, it will be in those dogs. Not all pit bulls bite, but a lot bred to fight will and fight to the death.

      • Anonymous

        Pitbull are the most gentleist animals but when involved in a dispute that if brought to them they will finish it. Meaning if another dog attacks a pitbull they will make sure they end up the winner.  And show it who’s boss. When a dog tried to boss my pittie around he pinned the other dog with his foot on the other dogs chest and stood on it to make sure the other dog knew not to do that again but he never hurt the other dog at all.

  • Anonymous

    Another fad….

  • Guest

    Any dog can do anything that you don’t want him to do. Period. German Shepherds, Pit Bulls, Dobermans, and Rottweilers get all the bad press-and often deserve it , but a cute little 5 pound dog can take a pretty good hunk out of your ankle!

    • Jason Fraser

       That makes about as much sense as saying anyone can take a gun and go out and blow away half their neighbors. Of course they CAN, but they DON”T! The same with dogs. Any large dog CAN rip the limbs from adults, scalp and kill them, but they DON’T. Tell me when was the last time you heard of a German shepherd, Doberman or Rottweiler tearing the limbs from an adult human being or scalping someone? Last summer, pit bulls in Florida, New York, Arizona and California ripped the limbs from people and one in Colorado scalped a woman and these attacks lasted only a few minutes. Even when these other breeds kill someone, they don’t dismember and/or scalp their victims. Last year, pit bulls were responsible for approximately 70% of the deaths by dog in the US despite the fact they are estimated to make up no more than 5% of the dog population in this country. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out there is something badly wrong with these 4-legged sharks and the people who own and defend them.

      • Anonymous

        you are one of those people that stereotype people and animals and spew ignorant comments from your pie hole. I know what im talking about when referrring to pitbulls. I have had many and trained them to be loveing pets and have had not one problem.When a dog whatever breed it is ,is provoked,tormented,left outside,abused or neglected it will turn on a person in a split second. I have seen it many times when people have dogs and or cats and their kids are picking cats up by the tails,and then they scratch the kid all over is it the cats fault or the child or parents?When a child lays,jumps,hits,throw rocks,or pulls on a dogs ears ,tail or legs and the child gets bit,is it the dogs fault or the childs or the parents? A friend of mine had a golden retriever and when they came home from work sombody had thrown some gas on the dog and threw a match on it inside the pen and set it on fire,,with several skin grafts and community support the dog recovered but was never the same,,,whos fault was that the dogs or the idiots that threw the gas on it? If people are going to have an animal they need to educate their children,and train their dogs. Plain and simple.

      • Guest

        I agree with much of what you are saying. However I think that the issue is  much more complictated. I wouldn’t consider owning any of these breeds you mention, but I also wouldn’t leave a young child alone with the sweetest Golden Retreiver ever born. I probably presented my pointed poorly- People trust all dogs too much.

      • Anonymous

        Too bad people, even “professional” people misidentify dog breeds on a regular basis.

  • Anonymous

     
    I have a pitbull and my granddaughter whos 2 walked up to her while she was sleeping and took her fist and hit her on top of the head hard, all my dog did is bark at her. It is not the breed it is how they are raised. There there is your comment you wanted. I have told my daughter that she needs to teach my granddaughter to respect animals and not to maul them or she will get bit. I was around 7 years ols and at a birthday party, the german shepherd took my cake from me and I hit it on the head with a spoon and the german shepherd attacted me and put a hole in my arm with his fang tooth. Dog if in a situation will react just like any human would. Any dog is capable of biteing if put in a situation. Not just pitbulls.
     
    Some raise them for protection and for fighting, some raise them as pets and treat them as though they are family,you have to train them, but most people get animals and leave them outside chained and neglect them. Hope the children make out ok, but I would like to know what provoked the pit to attack the children,? Where were the parents?

  • Anonymous

    Thank God a coyote didn’t bite these youngsters. It would be the end of the world and justification to exterminte them once and for all by those who are sticken with coyote phobia.

    • Anonymous

      Try to stay on topic for once. This isn’t about your beloved coyotes.

      • Anonymous

        Sorry Bill has a point.

  • Anonymous

    Usually you can judge a dog by its owner.

    • Anonymous

      I’ve seen  a fair share of “Thug life” punks with them in Bangor. The problem is, they have a violent image and the owners want to emulate it. they would be the BAD OWNERS.

       I don’t envision a lot of middle class families getting that puppy for their 4 year old.

  • Another attack from a dog the owner probably bragged would “lap you to death”. These useless dogs are always a danger as you never know when one will pop a gasket,and when they do, they dont just bite a person,they try to maul and kill you. These dogs are hard wired to bite and maul. While any dog can bite,these dogs  like to kill. They are not worth the trouble.

    • Anonymous

      And your source for your “informed” opinion is what?

    • Anonymous

      “Probably” or, in other words, you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about so you make stuff up based on anecdotes.

  • Anonymous

    Nothing to see here, people.     Move along, move along…..

  • Anonymous

    oh let’s hear the chorus, “it’s all in how you raise them”.

  • Anonymous

    eliminate dog licenses.

    require dog owner licenses.

  • Anonymous

    Pit bulls remind me of republicans..once they latch on to something..they don`t like to let go :>) :>) :>)…

  • Guest

    ….

  • Anonymous

    My girlfriend works at the Humane Society and if they reported every dog attack pitbulls wouldnt look half as bad. The media is at fault for perpetuating the idea that pitbulls are bad dogs. I wonder how many other dog attacks occurred in the past week, yet none were reported in the media because they are not pitbulls. 99% of people believe everything they hear and see, 1% use their brains.

    • Jason Fraser

      There were a heck of a lot of dog attacks in the “past week,” but the overwhelming majority of those attacks did not require calling an ambulance, treating the victim at the scene and then transporting him/her to the hospital! Anyone who believes what you and the other pit nutters say doesn’t have a brain!

      • Anonymous

        Again, I’m an EMT, most people arent intelligent enough to understand when to call an ambulance or when not to call an ambulance. I have no clue what the injuries were and I wouldn’t comment on them regardless, but the point remains, dogs in general regardless of breed will attack under certain conditions. As for the “pit nutters” say, I laughed, I’m far from such a thing. I think the dogs are ugly grunts. I am however intelligent enough to understand what a dog is. So believe what you will, your opinion is your own and my opinion is my own. I dont believe that pitbulls deserve the stereotypes given to them, and you can ask anyone in animal care and the vast majority will say the same.

      • Anonymous

        I dont think anyone is debating the severity of the attack (or non severity for that matter). The debate is simply about the fact that pits dont attack any more than other breeds.

      • Anonymous

        In my town the only two dog bites requiring ambulance transport was a Boxer and a mixed breed.

  • Guest

    …….

  • Anonymous

    there are bad people and bad dogs ..i believe a dog is only as smart as its owner or handler..if it is mean and you do not know that side of your dog you did something wrong while raising and getting to know your pet and like humans anything provoked can be very dangerous.. dogs with short fuses around children should be locked up when a child is present… again back to the owner being at fault.

  • Anonymous

    Can we be honest? Of course the owner makes the dog but why is it that Pits are usually involved  in these cases?   Yes we key on it when it’s a pit, but I don’t see a lot of attacks by Collies or Labs.

     This is nothing more the speculation but the breed appears to be genetically program towards violence. Not a good dog, not a bad dog but it is something we need to address honestly. And owners need to Own up to that before we can get any further.

    I’ve seen some around Bangor and once again, let’s be honest. It’s often the druggy tough guy walking down the street with a pit.

    • Anonymous

      “Can we be honest?”

      Yes, why don’t we.
      ~~~~~
      “Of course the owner makes the dog but why is it that Pits are usually involved  in these cases?”

      Because they often make the news and every other dog bite doesn’t.  

      • Anonymous

        As a pro-pit person your gonna believe what your gonna believe. My policy is more animals on the planet less people but I have the sense to say, Ummm, hundreds of breeds, don’t really need to get one that has the ability to do with it’s jaws what few other animals in existence can do.’ A Collie or even a Shepherd aren’t gonna get mad one day out of nowhere, and even if they do. I can get their jaws off of me.

        • Anonymous

          Let me clear up one misconception you have of me, I am not a “pro-pit person” I am a pro-dog person.
          ~~~~~
          Now let’s clear up the misconceptions contained in your post.

          “My policy is more animals on the planet…..don’t really need to get one that has the ability to do with it’s jaws what few other animals in existence can do.’ A Collie or even a Shepherd aren’t gonna get mad one day out of nowhere, and even if they do. I can get their jaws off of me”

          Dr. Brady Barr of the National Geographic show Dangerous Encounters: Bite Force (2007) measured the bite strength of several different creatures including the American Pit Bull, German Shepherd Dog and Rottweiler. The average bite strength as measured by a bite sleeve was 269 pounds with the Rottweiler topping out at 328 pounds.

          So you should be more concerned about a Rottie then a “Pit Bull”

          and

          In the Journal of Anatomy in 2009, Dr. Ellis demonstrated that the size of the animal and the shape of its own jaw predicted bite strength. The larger the dog and the dog’s head, and the wider the jaw, the higher the bite force turned out to be. The winner? Mastiff at 552 pounds which is just short of the force of a lions bite.

          So I stand corrected, you REALLY should be concerned about a Mastiff.

          And “Pit Bulls” cannot “lock their jaws”, that is a fallacy.

          • Great job of re-arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic

          • Anonymous

            Do you often have difficulty with facts?

          • Anonymous

             A yup, my opinion is the same on Rots.  Okay so your saying they don’t lock I believe that How much difference is there between locking and taking four people to pull it off? Splitting hairs..

             Once again, I love animals but I have common sense at the same time. I would never suggest we take them away or euthanize them but I would discourage breeding them in the future.

             Think what you want but if I had a toddler and a neighbor brought a pit or a Rot  around I would have concerns and I don’t feel they would be unfounded..

             Pit’s and Rot’s aren’t evil or bad ,they’re dogs. Italian’s are prone to darker hair, The Irish have a lotta redheads.  Breeds all have different , characteristics. If you are not willing to admit that it’s more likely i’ll be attacked by a Pit then a border Collie, a poodle, a Beagle, a Labrador retriever,  a Bull Mastiff  a Malamute,or many of other countless breeds then I guess we’ll just have to agree to disagree.

          • Anonymous

            “A yup, my opinion is the same on Rots.  Okay so your saying they don’t
            lock I believe that How much difference is there between locking and
            taking four people to pull it off? Splitting hairs..”

            Nope…difference between urban legend and fact.
            ~~~~~
            Now if you want to talk about breeds that were developed for “protection”…let’s discuss the Doberman Pincher. That breed was developed for protection pure and simple.

            I wonder why if breeding is what it is all about and where it is at, we don’t hear about more attacks by Dobermans?

          • Anonymous

             You realize that I am aware of what I posted. No need to repeat the entire post.

             You have fun with your own personal reality.

          • Anonymous

            At least my “presonal reality” is based in fact rather than fiction.

  • Anonymous

    Let’s just hope you and your dogs aren’t the subject of a future article.

    If you have done any research you’ll find that MANY of the ATTACKS came out of absolutely nowhere. I’m glad you love your dogs and i’m ceratinly not one calling for a ban but I do hope your not so naive as to think it could NEVER happen. Others thought the same.

  • DonHorchKingofMen

    “AND IM TELLING YOU I HAVE NEVER HAD ONE PROBLEM EXCEPT WHEN PEOPLE STOP
    AND BLOCK TRAFFIC THEY STARE BECAUSE THEY ARE SO BEAUTIFUL!!! “..Um,I dont think that they are stopping and staring at your ‘dogs’honey…Im so glad that I am not one of your neighbors…Wow….This is a Howie Carr moment if there ever was one…

  • Anonymous

    Very sad.  When are people going to learn?  Yes yes, I know.  The way an animal is raised has a great bearing on their outcome.  I believe it’s part nature, part nurture.  The instinctual reactions of an animal is nearly impossible to overcome in certain situation, IMO.  These dogs, in my opinion, have, and always will have, a tendency to be aggressive and I would never own one.  In any case, I do hope the parties make a full recovery.

  • Anonymous

    Treat your dog with love and he’ll love you back……………….unless somebody has already abused him before you got him; then it takes time.

  • Anonymous

    Glad the injuries are not life threatening.  Could have been worse.

  • Anonymous

    FRO2011 statistics
    31 U.S. fatal dog attacks occurred in 2011. Despite being regulated in Military Housing areas and over 650 U.S. cities, pit bulls led these attacks accounting for 71% (22). Pit bulls make up less than 5% of the total U.S. dog population.2Notably in 2011, adult victims of fatal pit bull attacks more than doubled the number of child victims. Of the 22 total pit bull victims, 68% (15) fell between the ages of 32 to 76, and 32% (7) were ages 5 years and younger. The year 2011 also marks an increase in pet pit bulls killing their owners. Of the 8 total instances this year in which a family dog inflicted fatal injury to its primary caretaker, the dog’s owner, 88% (7) involved pet pit bulls.Together, pit bulls (22) and rottweilers (4), the number two lethal dog breed, accounted for 84% of all fatal attacks in 2011. In the 7-year period from 2005 to 2011, this same combination accounted for 73% (156) of the total recorded deaths (213).The breakdown between pit bulls and rottweilers is substantial over this 7-year period. From 2005 to 2011, pit bulls killed 127 Americans,3 about one citizen every 20 days, versus rottweilers, which killed 29; about one citizen every 88 days.Annual data from 2011 shows that 58% (18) of the attacks occurred to adults (21 years and older) and 42% (13) occurred to children (11 years and younger). Of the children, 62% (8) occurred to ages 1 and younger. 2011 data also shows that 39% (12) of the fatal incidents involved more than one dog; 26% (8) involved breeding on the dog owner’s property either actively or in the recent past, and 6% (2) involved tethered dogs, down from 9% in 2010 and 19% in 2009.Dog ownership information for 2011 shows that family dogs comprised 65% (20) of the attacks that resulted in death; 74% (23) of all incidents occurred on the dog owner’s property and 29% (9) resulted in criminal charges, up from 15% in 2010.The states of California and Texas led fatalities in 2011, each with 4 deaths; pit bulls and their mixes contributed to 88% (7) of the 8 deaths. North Carolina, New Mexico, South Carolina and Virginia each incurred 2 deaths.See: Full news release.
    2011 U.S. dog bite fatalities2011 fatal dog attacks by breedIn 2011, one fatality involved dogs from up to four different dog breeds,4 thus producing a “death credit” total of 33 rather than 31. Up to seven dog breeds contributed to one death: Alaskan malamute, American bulldog, “bulldog” (American or English not specified), cane corso, doberman pinscher, German shepherd and Japanese akita.
     

  • Anonymous

    I think we can all agree…..many people shouldn’t own dogs shouldn’t, many people who shouldn’t own dogs do, many of those people seem to choose a pitbull/rotty.   Also in the neck of the woods I live in many of these people are 18, 19, 20 year old males who between owning the “intimidating” pitbull/rotty also have a couple women knocked up.  Bottom line, these people don’t have the time to take care of their children so why would we expect them to take care of their dog.  They could own a golden retriever and that dog would be a menace.   Not to say this is the case here…..perhaps this is good dog goes bad.  On a related note, I know several people who own a “pitbull” and they are the nicest most well behaved dogs….put the time in and any dog will be harmless.

  • Anonymous

    Pit bulls were bred for fighting and killing. Why would anyone expect them to be lovable and docile like most dogs are? And yes, there are some exceptions.

    • Anonymous

      Actually there are many exceptions…I have seen many certified therapy dogs that are “Pit Bulls”. And by certified I mean they have passed several tests and have been certified as a therapy dog.

  • Anonymous

    Here we go again. I feel sorry for the kids but what did they do to the dog? I don’t see in the article any information on the parents or where they were? Pitbulls don’t just “attack” unless provoked!!!! Any dog will bite or attack when provoked. It’s always ” pitbull” stories though that make the paper though………….  poor dog gets singled out……. bummer for all involved…

  • The only good pitbull,Rotti, etc, is one with 3 eyes, with the third eye being aproximatly 400 thousands of an inch across.

  • the paper is wrong.  the news said it was a bull dog.  Yet again the incompetent reporters at the Bangor daily needs to check their facts before they write this crap.

  • Anonymous

    Pit bull owners can be found swimming (the stupid dogs themselves usually can’t swim) in the shallow end of the gene pool. Sure, all dogs can bite and some pit bulls aren’t mean, but they’re all stupid.

    What were these dogs bred for???? (Not family pets)

  • i have an idea. just read that almost 70% of fatal car accidents that happened between 12am and 3am involved alcohol. ssoo lets ban ALL driving between 12am and 3am. that will fix the problem.

  • Anonymous

    Every time an article comes out talking about a dog bite or mauling involving an animal identified as a pit bull (whether it actually is or not) people come out of the wood work with their negative opinions. Yes, if it is a pit bull attack the reality is that the media will report it, as compared to an attack by a lab, or german shepard, or any other type of dog. So yes, it is hysteria created by media hype. If it were actually reported the number of severe attacks from other animals you would feel the same about them more than likely. And often the injuries from an actual Pit Bull and other similiar animals are more severe than a chihuaua bite, but that doesnt really matter. A bite is a bite, some more traumatic than others regardless. Saw a husky take someones eyelid almost off once, saw a chihuahua  injure a tendon in someones ankle. This animal IS more muscular and capable than a smaller dog, just as a draft horse is more likely to cause more severe damage than a pony when it kicks, or a semi is more likely to injure or kill someone in an accident than a buick. Seriously though, it totally rocks my boat to read so many comments that blame a population or breed rather than the individual animal. That type of thinking is a huge nasty virus that runs rampant through society tainting everything we do, from judging people to judging animals. In this day and age we should be past all that….

  • Anonymous

    When I was 5 years old, I was bit on mouth by a mutt.  The cut bled, but was fixed with peroxide and a band aid.  Had that been a Pit Bull, I probably would not have a face right now.  Any dog can bite, but few breeds can inflict the kind of damage that a Pit Bull does.

    • Anonymous

      Really? Are you sure of that?

      Dr. Brady Barr of the National Geographic show Dangerous Encounters: Bite Force (2007) measured the bite strength of several different creatures including the American Pit Bull, German Shepherd Dog and Rottweiler. The average bite strength as measured by a bite sleeve was 269 pounds with the Rottweiler topping out at 328 pounds.

      So you should be more concerned about a Rottie then a “Pit Bull”

      and

      In the Journal of Anatomy in 2009, Dr. Ellis demonstrated that the size of the animal and the shape of its own jaw predicted bite strength. The larger the dog and the dog’s head, and the wider the jaw, the higher the bite force turned out to be. The winner? Mastiff at 552 pounds which is just short of the force of a lions bite.

      So I stand corrected, you REALLY should be concerned about a Mastiff.

      • Anonymous

        I believe I said “but few breeds”  Since you listed three other breeds, then I guess we agree.

        • Anonymous

          I doubt we agree at all…

          The worst dog bite I have ever treated was inflicted by a Boxer.

          The worst dog bite I have ever seen (multiple tearing to the face) was inflicted by a mutt (no pit bull in the mix).

          The last fatal dog bite case in Maine was a Rottie.

      • Anonymous

        I am concerned about the breeds you gave as example, especially the Mastiff.  I can’t remember the last time I saw a Rottie or a Mastiff, so I guess I don’t worry about them so much.  However, Pit Bulls are everywhere these days.

        • Anonymous

          The breeds listed were the choice of Dr. Barr and Dr. Ellis. The question in the study they were looking to answer was which breed had the strongest bite force.

  • Anonymous

    I will pepper spray any pitbull I see in or around my yard. I just told the guy across the street that this very day.

    • Anonymous

      Sounds like criminal threatening to me.

      • Anonymous

        Really?  Seriously?  Isn’t one allowed to keep the neighbors dog out of their yard?

        • Anonymous

          Of course you’re allowed to keeep animals out of your yard, but when you say “I will pepper spray any pitbull I see in or around my yard. I just told the guy across the street that this very day.” That’s criminal threatening. If you pepper spray an animal that is not threatening you in any way shape or form and can’t prove that you were in fear of life, limb or dismemberment you could be charged with animal cruelty. Since they posted on here a premeditated intent to harm the dog and/or owner, the charges could be elevated to aggrevated assault and aggrevated animal cruelty if they did ,in fact, pepper spray a non aggresive dog and owner.

          • Anonymous

            Interesting.  I guess it makes sense when you put it that way.  I was under the assumption that pegton meant “in” the yard but you are right.  They said “in or around” and I guess that fits your point quite well.  What say you pegton?  The sad part here is that pegton had to have this talk with their neighbor.

  • Q: Which word does NOT belong in this headline.
    “Family’s pet pit bull attacks two in Waldoboro”
    If you guessed the word “pet” you win.

  • It’s not dog’s that kill people, it’s people who kill people….If you have a dog you need to maintain control of it at ALL times.  Provide adequate shelter and fencing for your breed of dog.  And people, for the love of god, learn how to respect/approach dogs properly and teach your children how to do the same!  Every pet owner needs to be responsible and spay/neuter their pet’s to reduce the number ending up in shelters or being abandoned.

  • Anonymous

    Doverman’s were the danger of the 70’s or was it the 80’s? Rotweilders were the dangers of the 80’s or the 90’s? German Shephards were the danger of the 90’s or was it 00? Now pitbulls 2010…….. What is next? Wolfdogs will be the target of 2020?

  • Anonymous

    Lets see, this dog is made to go into a pit in the ground and chase and eat the feet right out from under a bull, a live bull!, ya 2 teens have a chance!

  • Anonymous

    Maybe adults that keep kids around notorious breeds should go to the vet for a check between the ears?

  • Anonymous

    Here we go with the inevitable pro/con discussion on dog breeds.  How about something new!

  • I knew these comments would be nothing but degrading pitbulls. People it depends on how you raise the dog a friggin loveable black lab can turn on you! Sometimes theres an underlining medical condition that no one finds out til this happens and they have it put down.  Just be happy the kids are ok and leave the issue of the breed of dog alone, it doesnt matter!

  • Anonymous

    Deleted

  • Anonymous

    Here’s an idea:  why don’t we furnish our law enforcement officers with retrained pit bulls?  That would help take a bite out of crime.

    • Anonymous

      I think that would be a huge leap foward in educating the public about these dogs. 

  • Anonymous

    Yes Pit Bulls or pit types have it in them to be aggressive. I
    had  pits years ago, used them for hunting wild hogs in the south.  I would not have turned my back on any of them.  I took one female pup and raised her for a pet. She was wonderful , let my moms toy poodle pups take food out of her mouth , loved people , and only once showed aggression . A friend and I were wrestling he pinned me, she came around the corner of the house and jumped him held him to the ground by his throat and growled till she foamed. I called her off and things were fine.  You need be aware of what might trigger them to go off.

  • Anonymous

    All these dogs should be destroyed, locked jaws or unlocked jaws. They’re dangerous, they bite and they kill children if given the opportunity. Bad owners….good owners, who really cares, it doesn’t matter….. They’ve got bad genetics

    • Anonymous

      while we’re at it lets kill everything you’re afraid of.

  • So were the kids alone with the dog when this happened??? That would bring up a whole new string of questions….No kid is going to admitt that they provoked it, especially now that it’s in the papers.

  • “All dogs are capable of attacking” – yes, but statistically Pit Bulls and Rottweillers, dogs that were bred for aggressiveness and strength, are far, far more likely to bite – and to be provoked by little or nothing –  than other breeds. Chows are up there as well. So the parents of these children should be the ones locked up in quarantine. There is no reason to have this type of dog unless you own a junkyard and want to leave it there at night…. They are not family dogs, and anyone who says different is not living in the real world.

  • This incident is unfortunate but hopefully we hear the details of the “investigation” and hopefully the teens were not teasing/antagonizing the dog.  We will likely not hear these details…The news has a tendancy to want to publish “sensational or shocking stories.”  For some reason people I know that were bit (causing damage) by other “family friendly” dogs never made the news.  The dog was a rescue from the south (VA) so it is likely hard to know it’s background and whether or not it was abused in the past.  I have been bitten by 5 dogs in 32 years, a chihuhua that ripped skin off my finger, a poodle that did the same, a collie (think Lassie) while walking by a driveway, a springer spaniel that got loose and was clearly abused by kids walking by as it was tethered, and lastly an American Eskimo that bit me in the face when I was about 14.  I had to get 8 stitches on my upper lip and 3 on my bottom lip.  NONE were covered by the news and the last one which was clearly the worst, would most definitely have been called a “mauling” if a newsworthy dog like a pit bull or rottie did the bite.    I don’t blame the dogs in any of my bites, some were clearly abused possibly by other kids, two were small and easily frightened, and the American Eskimo had surgery recently with meds and was not all with it.  I have owned many dogs and two of which were American Pit Bull Terriers.  Out of all the dogs I’ve owned (goldens, shepherd/lab, chihuahua, poodles) the APBT’s were the most human (big and small) friendly.  People can’t get these bully breeds and not properly exercise and TRAIN them.  What people don’t understand is that YES they can be animal aggressive but historically if they bit a human they were put down.  Human aggression was bred out of them to make sure people in the “pits” weren’t bitten while breaking up a fight etc.  This breed is by far the most abused dog out there and one of the most forgiving.   Blame the deed not the Breed… 

  • This incident is unfortunate but hopefully we hear the details of the “investigation” and hopefully the teens were not teasing/antagonizing the dog.  We will likely not hear these details…The news has a tendancy to want to publish “sensational or shocking stories.”  For some reason people I know that were bit (causing damage) by other “family friendly” dogs never made the news.  The dog was a rescue from the south (VA) so it is likely hard to know it’s background and whether or not it was abused in the past.  I have been bitten by 5 dogs in 32 years, a chihuhua that ripped skin off my finger, a poodle that did the same, a collie (think Lassie) while walking by a driveway, a springer spaniel that got loose and was clearly abused by kids walking by as it was tethered, and lastly an American Eskimo that bit me in the face when I was about 14.  I had to get 8 stitches on my upper lip and 3 on my bottom lip.  NONE were covered by the news and the last one which was clearly the worst, would most definitely have been called a “mauling” if a newsworthy dog like a pit bull or rottie did the bite.    I don’t blame the dogs in any of my bites, some were clearly abused possibly by other kids, two were small and easily frightened, and the American Eskimo had surgery recently with meds and was not all with it.  I have owned many dogs and two of which were American Pit Bull Terriers.  Out of all the dogs I’ve owned (goldens, shepherd/lab, chihuahua, poodles) the APBT’s were the most human (big and small) friendly.  People can’t get these bully breeds and not properly exercise and TRAIN them.  What people don’t understand is that YES they can be animal aggressive but historically if they bit a human they were put down.  Human aggression was bred out of them to make sure people in the “pits” weren’t bitten while breaking up a fight etc.  This breed is by far the most abused dog out there and one of the most forgiving.   Blame the deed not the Breed… 

  • Anonymous

    Shoot the dog!

  • Anonymous

    Seriously!  I owned a Border Collie that bit my son in the face requiring stitches above his lip.   Why wasn’t that in the news?    The only reason we are reading about this is because its a Pit.   Give the Pits a break! Any dog can bite. 

  • Anonymous

    The bottom line is ALL DOGS are in the animal category for a reason . Adults watch your children when they are around any ANIMAL !

You may also like