October 19, 2017
Health Latest News | Poll Questions | Haunted Maine | Obamacare | National Anthem Protests

Comments for: Top 5 percent of MaineCare recipients account for more than half the program’s cost

Guidelines for posting on bangordailynews.com

The Bangor Daily News and the Bangor Publishing Co. encourage comments about stories, but you must follow our terms of service.

  1. Keep it civil and stay on topic
  2. No vulgarity, racial slurs, name-calling or personal attacks.
  3. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked.
The primary rule here is pretty simple: Treat others with the same respect you'd want for yourself. Here are some guidelines (see more):

  • StillRelaxin

    I’ve got news for you Mr. LePage, this 5% who is receiving nursing home care is currently receiving “Care” that would make anyone who is aware of their plight hope for sudden death to come long before being carted off to a nursing home. I’m personally aware of how many of these nursing homes seek to “Care” for their clients. The number one goal for them is to cut cost everywhere to maximize profits. If anyone doubts this simply do some digging on the subject of how well the dietary needs of nursing home patients are being met. In short what you will find is bare minimum diets to sustain life. If that’s their standard for feeding what do you suppose their standard is for everything else? Scary, huh? Why do I think this is much the same strategy for living that Mr. LePage has planned for all Mainers?

    • Anonymous

      Since you sound like an expert in nursing care, can you tell me what the profit of margin is for the average nursing home in Maine. If nursing homes are so profitable why aren’t they teeming everywhere? Something is missing here. I’ve visited at least three nursing homes in Maine in the past years and have not detected any lapse in dietary needs. Maybe the food being served was just make-believe food, but it surely didn’t look like slops to me.

      For the most part, I found the staffs to be very hard working and dedicated. I don’t know how a state-run operation could do any better.

      • Anonymous

        I was in a nursing home for rehab from an operation for quite a few weeks. The food was terrible.
        Relatives brought in canned peaches and pears for me and bread, peanut butter and other things  to eat. I went from 132 lbs down to 119 lbs during that stay. The help was wonderful, and I had no other complaints other than the food. The poor souls that were permanent residents there were mostly alzheimer patients so they  didn’t realize what they were eating. A nursing home is the last place a person would check themselves into I believe. It’s only when you need the skilled help, and as a last resort, that most people wind up in a nursing home. This nursing home was not a state run facility but under private ownership.

        • Anonymous

          There are not state run facilities; they are all privately owned.

      • Anonymous

        Were your visits planned or unanounced? Having worked in two nursing homes I saw things that put horror on a new level. I spoke up once about a situation…..that’s why I have worked in two nursing homes. I had to leave the nursing field not because of the work, but because of the inhuman conditions that were being inflicked on the innocent residents. With all the strength I can muster in my older age, I will NEVER subject my golden years to such maddness.

        • Anonymous

          Bravo…I’ll follow your lead

          • Anonymous

            Dollars would go Further with No Fraud.
            Reporting Fraud in Maine
            Allegations of fraud or attempted fraud involving funds, including Food Stamps,
            administered by the Department of Health and Human Services should be sent to:
            Fraud, Investigation and Recovery
            11 State House Station
            Whitten Road
            Augusta, Maine 04333-0011

            Phone numbers for DHHS Fraud office are:
            1-207-287-2409 and 1-800-442-6003
            Further questions and suspicions can also be submitted by e-mail.
            Fraud.Dhhs@maine.gov

            Contact the Office of the Attorney General
            Phone: 207-626-8800
            Mailing Address:
            Office of the Attorney General
            6 State House Station
            Augusta, ME 04333

            http://www.maine.gov/ag/contact.html

            Do All three, Phone, E-mail and send a Letter.
            Follow-up in 30 days with a Certified letter if no response.
            Send a letter Directly to the Governor’s Office, that should get their attention.
            Keep a written log of actions and attempts to notify.
            Hold them Responsible!

          • Anonymous

            I reported social security disability fraud in this way and the person still receives it.

          • Anonymous

            Where do we report people who claim ‘fraud’ where none can be demonstrated.  For example, where do I report Penguin for alleging voter fraud, or Poliquin for alleging unemployment fraud?  Don’t see those numbers on your list.

          • Anonymous

            You sure got some growing up to do.

          • Anonymous

            Oh please.  You’ve got some education to accomplish. 

          • Anonymous

            I reported ROBert Nutting to your hotline address…and apparently since he’s a top flight ROBthePUBLICan in this state, his personal theft of $1.25 million via MaineCare fraud is ok. So you can stop posting your useless address/fraud post. It clearly doesn’t get any results. Bang Bang Bang

        • Anonymous

          My wife had the same experience. I the husband heard about it and am still traumatized.

        • Anonymous

          I very firmly agree with you!—Until you have worked in one of the so excellent places, or been a patient, you have no idea at all!!

      • Anonymous

        Stay away from Brewer rehab. Not just the food but the laziness of certain staff. Not changing diapers, bedding, or clothes. just to name one part of the problem. Not saying all staff hate their jobs but the ones that are responsible for hygiene need to spend a day in their own bodily wastes so they can get a feel for it.

        • Anonymous

          This has, unfortunately, been what I have heard, too.  I’ve had several friends work there and leave due to the treatment (or lack thereof) of the patients.  Sadly, complaints fall on deaf ears.  For some supervisors, either $ is the bottom line or they are too inept or scared to call people out on their actions.  Either way, they should be pulled from their positions.

        • Anonymous

          From having a sister in there years ago, I know everything you have just written is true!!  But the worst I have ever seen is Eastside Rehab—I worked there a few years ago, and could not believe the way  things were  done there!! It was closed for a while because of so many complaints,re-opened, and God knows what it’s like now–There wasen’t even a laundry on-site,  it went to Brewer,  never had clean linens after day shift was over. I saw some nurses do some pretty unorthodox procedures, that didn’t do much for the patient.  I watched a son come in at 10:00 at nite and carry his mom out of there in his arms, to the hospital.—We all  watched that. .  It was Bad–And before I go to any one of those places, I will crawl into my own bed and stay there until I expire!

          • Anonymous

            I am not going to debate whether Eastside Rehab is good or bad; I’ve never been there, so I couldn’t say. However, how would you know the nurses do some pretty unorthodox procedures unless you are a nurse yourself? Not that it is impossible that such a thing would happen, like any other group of professionals there are good ones and bad ones. Chances are though, there were at least some good nurses (if in fact there were bad ones there)  Exactly what were these “unorthodox” procedures, because I can tell you whether they are or are not unorthodox.

        • Anonymous

          My mother was at Brewer Rehab and I thank god for the excellent treatment and wonderful staff there.  They went above and beyond what they were required to do to make her stay more pleasant. If thats the type of care all rehabs and nursing homes provide, then its money well spent.

          • Anonymous

            I don’t know what planet you live on, but I have to strongly disagree. Families will write in an obit how wonderful a home was yet they hardly ever were there to see how the person was treated.

          • Anonymous

            You know that for a FACT?  I don’t think so.  Brewer has a 5 star rating.  It’s not perfect, but they give good care.  They have dedicated staff who care about the people there.  As with any facility (nursing home or hospital) you will have people that have had negative experiences. 

        • Anonymous

          You are so right about Brewer Rehab. My aunt was there, paying $100,000 annually from her own pocket.  I visited her everyday for 2 yrs and I was usually there 2 hrs everyday. t’s a dump. It is so difficult to see someone you love in such a place and treated so poorly. I wouldn’t fed the meals there to a dog. I often brought my aunt McDonald’s or Tim Horton’s food
          so she would eat something. I saw how they treated the ones who no longer had their minds. No respect. very, very sad and uncalled for. the CNAs who were good left once they found better jobs.

          • Anonymous

            Perhaps you are more upset at the fact that your aunt spent what you felt was your inheritance.  She had the opportunity to move, correct?  But chose not to.  Maybe you were put out by having to drive to Brewer to visit her.  If you loved her so much, then perhaps you could have taken care of her at home.  –  In any facility, the food is, “institutional”.  You have 100+ patients on various diets/ restrictions and texture needs.  It is impossible to please everyone.  Did she have a problem with the food or did you? 

      • Anonymous

        my experience as well.

      • Anonymous

        Nursing homes are not profitable.  They way they are able to make their bottom line is through their Medicare services.  MeCare does not pay enought to cover even the basic cost of room and board for patients.  Which is why the cost for private pay patients is higher.  This off sets the loss paid (not paid) byMeCare.  (most) people who work in nursing facilities do so because they love their jobs and are dedicated to taking care of those who can’t care for themselves.  It certainly is not for the money, since they could go to work for Wal-Mart at the same $8.50 and not have to work nearly as hard. 

    • Anonymous

      Ouch!

      • Anonymous

        Don’t worry folks. Obamacare’s death panels will lower cost by having these people put out to pasture. Of course they’ll come up with some benign sounding euphemism.

        • Anonymous

          Medicine is big evil business. Mainecare supports this business. It’s time to look at why medicine can charge whatever they want.

          • Anonymous

            Yes, medicine is big evil business.  Please return to the mothership and I suggest you stop buying aspirin and other products made by those big evil businesses. Maybe you can make your own out of tree bark.

          • Anonymous

            Had you been able to keep up, you would understand my post. Say hi to your sister for me.

          • Anonymous

            great point….just think….if  medicaid (MaineCare) could “negotiate” for lower prescription prices like the VA does…it would save millions right there!  But the pharmaceutical companies lobby to prevent this and win because too many benefit$$ from this and the working poor lose again.

          • Insurance is the big evil, not medicine.

          • Anonymous

            You are correct. The medical business helped pay for Obamas campagin. I have notice that people who had HMO insurance for the last 30 years are all dying, many from cancer. Why is that?
            Why are people dying in their 40s,50s and early 60s (or baby boomers) in mass amounts?
            I guess if the government can force cereal companies to reduce price, they can medical care. It seems to me they are encouraging mass murder.
             If health care cost were reduced, we could send insurance companies overseas where our jobs went.

        • Anonymous

          Death panels? Thank you Sarah Palin.

          private insurers ” manage” care and conduct utilization review to the point where they end up just denying care. there is your death panel pal.

          • Anonymous

            Wow, that Palin Derangement Syndrome sure is powerful.

          • Anonymous

            that’s all you have?

            why even bother?

        • Guest

          You’re still pitching the death panels?!?!?!?!

          OK let me guess, Obama is a sleeper cell terrorist from the Middle East?

        • Anonymous

          You have the names wrong–it’s LePage and his ilk that are in favor of “putting people out to pasture” rather than providing medical care. It’s President Obama who favors medical care for all Americans who need it.

        • pbmann

          No death panels in the Affordable Healthcare law,that was just made up by conservatives.

          • Anonymous

            Whenever your life or healthcare is a line item on a government budget bill you should always be concerned.

             They may not be “death panels” but there is a lot of talk about reducing different kinds of cancer screenings in order to make the budget balance. What other items are on the agenda?

          • Anonymous

            So then enlighten us…

            What is the difference between your life or healthcare being a line item on a government budget bill versus being a line item on a corporation’s budget?

    • Andrew Perkins

      They cant over feed them, they could get uppity.

    • Anonymous

      I deeply resent your comments.  Having spent the last 17 years of my career in geriatric care I can tell you first hand that, as in all aspects of care received at nursing homes, state and federal regulations are stringent on meeting the nutritional needs of these clients.  Here in Maine, especially, long term care facilities are inspected from top to bottom, in every aspect of the care they provide.  Furthermore, the State is quick to respond to complaints of familes regarding the care of their loved ones.  The dietary regulations even mandate that foods are not to be mixed and fed to clients-i.e. separate portions of food on dietary trays can’t be mixed and fed to a client.  Finally, the number one goal of every nursing home with which I have dealt is to provide the very best of care to the clients they serve.  Are mistakes made?  Of course they are but the people who provide and oversee care do the very best they can with the resources they have.  Maine’s record of quality care is unmatched.

      • Anonymous

        If the food at Brewer Rehab is so great why did they have a meeting for the  doctors  catered? I saw the van drive up with the food for the doctors and other health professionals attending the meeting. The nursing home didn’t feed the doctors the cube steak that looked like it was made of cardboard. I woman I have known for many years was told by 1 of the CNA’s that her sister would no longer visit her if she wouldn’t eat.

        • Anonymous

          That CNA should have been fired.

          On the other hand Doc’s and nurses and all sorts of people have catered lunches and meetings all the time. Nothing new here.

        • Anonymous

          It is not uncommon to have a meeting catered.  It is unreasonable to ask the dietary staff who are preparing meals and special diets for 100+ residents to prepare a meal for an additional 25-30 people.  Please!  Are you really that desperate to complain about Brewer?  Have you ever been to a staff meeting at SJH?  Sister Norberter served lobster, Scallops, etc.  Nothing but the best.  And this was on a regular basis.  They did not eat from the cafateria. 

    • Anonymous

      One way to save money is to fire all the useless meeting takers and “quiet time” abusers who work for DHHS. Everyone  classified as “non-essential” the last time there was a  snow day and stayed home would be on the list.

  • Anonymous

    Well, there is the answer… put down the old folks… Problem solved!

    • Anonymous

      ya!  Can you believe it John?

    • Anonymous

      Or give them some pain pills and send them home like Obama suggested we do.

      • Anonymous

        And, exactly WHERE did the President suggest this … ??

      • Anonymous

        your pants are on fire

      • Anonymous

        Not accurate. President Obama favors health care for all Americans who need it.

    • Anonymous

      That IS the way LePage thinks… some people matter and some don’t.  I suppose the elderly and incredibly helpless folks just didn’t make it into his “These People Matter” book.  It’s beyond disgusting that he is  targeting the elderly and severely disabled to accomplish budget cuts.  Does he think they won’t know? Does he hope they just die off? What? What is he thinking?

    • I take it your not ever planning on being one of the “old folks,” eh??

      It’s funny how life happens and time flies and suddenly you’re one of them, too.

      It’s time to take the profit motive out of health insurance.. It wasn’t that long ago when insurance companies were required to be non-profit. This is the future of private enterprise controlling health care. It isn’t pretty.

      • Anonymous

        I am one of those “old folks”… I too, don’t agree with the GREED of insurance companies…

    • Anonymous

      Soylent Green!

      • what was that made of again?

  • Anonymous

    Wait another 20 years for the Baby Boomers to hit this age. The system will surely implode. There simply will not be enough tax revenue to cover it, unless everyone is taxed at 70%.

    • Guest

      I would recommend making corporate greed illegal, capping what people can earn, tax them appropriately and everyone share a peice of the pie. Oh, is that how Russia does things?

      • Anonymous

        Uh, no. That’s not how “Russia does things.” Ignorant comments server ZERO purpose other than to let us know what kind of person you are.

      • pbmann

        Russia has probably the most unregulated capitalistic free market of any country in the world and they are a mess because of it.

  • Anonymous

    These poor souls, given the choice, would rather be allowed to die comfortably than to endure the daily physical & mental declines.   Most would be mortified had they been able to look into the future & see their slow decline into incontinence, dependence & inablity to take care of their basic needs.   I, for one, do not  begrudge the care they are receiving or the monetary expense, I have nothing but compassion for them, it is not anyones fault, but in reality it sadly cannot continue.   I have a living will, my parents have living wills & people need to start taking responsibility of their end of life care while they are still of sound mind.      

    • Guest

      and what are your recommendations. NO one is in control of their end of life unless you kill yourself. Is the working class suppose to work to save for end of life and not have a life? Maybe I’m missing your point?

      • Oregon passed a Death with Dignity Act. So some Oregonians do have control over their end of life.

      • Anonymous

        My point is that we need to plan for our future which death is a part of.   Old age is cruel & spares no one who lives long enough. 

        • Anonymous

          So you have long termcare insurance so that you will not be using Taxpayer money to support you in a nursing home?

    • Thank you Thank you Thank you. If we don’t pass an assisted suicide law before I become like this poor woman, someone please dress me in white robes and drop me off in Harlem.

      • Anonymous

        I’ve already given my husband instructions to kill me before putting me in a nursing home. the only problem is he says he won’t because he doesn’t want to go to prison.

        • Anonymous

          He must really hate prison.

        • At this rate, we may be better off going to prison than hoping for nursing home coverage.  Which brings to mind – where are the lynch mobs on what it costs to pay for PRISONERS’ free health care???  Or does the general public not realize tax dollars foot the bill for their care?  All up in arms over families helped, while murderers and the ilk are living off our dimes at a much, much higher cost- in many ways. 

    • Anonymous

      Are we considering “Death Panels” or assisted suicide?

      Oh my

      • I’m for assisted suicide.  We treat our pets better than we do our own people.  If I’m in pain, physically or mentally, “put me down” like you would the family dog.  Put me out of my misery. 

        • Anonymous

          KK no problem, just sign up here.  We going to need you full name and address along with a list of next of kin and your obit. 

          • Well, you have my full name as I am not afraid of my opinions, and if you would come out from behind your anonymous screen name and were serious about my living will, than I would give you the rest of the information.  But you obviously want people to suffer in pain by not letting them take their own lives if they so choose. 

          • Anonymous

            Well I couln’t care less how many of you wish to die of how many of you do take your own life, but i do wish you would get the facts about Maincare and who its receipents are and the reason we can not cut its funding. Even if all the abusers were removed from its role it wouldn’t even make a dent.

          • Anonymous

            I’m sure that Oneof theCongreation has certain “values” that preclude assisted suicide.   It sounds like assisted suicide is a sin, but he will kill you if you disagree with his beliefs.

          • Anonymous

            congregation = correct spelling. Just sayin’…

        • Anonymous

          you want it done right now???? sounds like your in pain, Mental.

          • No I don’t want it done right now. Apparently you missed the key word in the third sentence.  “IF I’m in pain…” I’m not in pain so no, I don’t want it done right now.

    • Anonymous

      kk good I idea….Just stop giving food and water and let them die a slow death….Is that what you really want out of life….keep your living will up to date….

      • Funny thing is, if the family dog had even one of this woman’s problems let alone all of them, the  “humane” thing to do would be to put the dog down, and I doubt anyone would ask the dog what they felt about it. Living wills and Death with Dignity Acts allow others to know exactly what the person having to go through this ordeal want.

        • Anonymous

          yepper another society tried this tactic!  we went to war over it…..the war to end all wars  WWWll and that ant no web address!

          • Um what? For the life of me I cannot make any connection between WWII and Living Wills, and Death with Dignity Acts…

          • Anonymous

            Oh the Germans during WW 2 took their mentally ill, the old and others and killed them with gas.   No one is talking Death with Dignity here, the talk is that is just to expensive to keep support mainecare therefore they sould be just allowed to die or care should be withheld…. 

          • No, everyone was talking Death with Dignity. Nobody thinks we should kill the elderly or withhold care. Death with Dignity and Living Wills con not be imposed by others. The only state killing the mentally ill that i know of is Texas, and only then under some strict corporal punishment guidelines.

            And by the way, we didn’t get into WWII because of the camps, we didn’t know about them until we found them…

          • Anonymous

            The Americans knew about the camps before Europe was invaded.  That is history.

          • sassyfrazz

            Uh no.  The other “society” rounded up people who wanted to live and gassed them because a psychopath (who was worshipped fanatically by many) decided they weren’t the master race.That’s a far cry from me putting in writing that I don’t want heroic measures taken when I’m in the process of Mother Nature’s plan for population control – that is, dying.  

          • Anonymous

            Don’t forget that that other “society” was a big supporter of eugenics and that they tested their elimination procedures on the mentally ill and genetic mistakes first.

          • sassyfrazz

            Yes, and this society used them as guinea pigs for treatments too back in the day – after which, they usually lobotomized them and tossed them into a padded room to die.

            Still, there is no connection between that and what I put in legal writing as to what measures I want performed if I’m unable to speak for myself.

          • Anonymous

            Still the connection is once a society decides to eliminate a portion of the population legality is no problem paper or no paper.  You only have to change a few laws to satisfy the squeamish.  Remember the saying, “a nation of laws not men.”

          • pbmann

            I am sure you mean WWII but they were not practicing assisted suicide it was plain old genocide they were practicing..

        • Anonymous

          People are different in that they have souls.  If they choose death with dignity that is fine, but we have degernated as a society if we subject everyone to this choice.

          • No you don’t degenerate anyone with choice. That is the point of choice, you can choose either way. Yes or no. I want to, I don’t want to… Oregon has had Death with Dignity for a while now, most of those who are participating are educated. They are researching their choice. No one is being forced into it. Just like all the other hot button issues like abortion and gay marriage, those who do not want to do it, are not required to.

          • Anonymous

            every thing is made of energy, including people  & animals. You think animals don’t have a soul? have you ever seen a dog who loved someone and how he shows love? have you ever watched an animal run and play? Have you ever had your dog call you at 2 am ever morning because she knew she was dying and wanted you near? That is their soul and animals go to an after life, just as humans do. Energy never dies, it may change form, just as water turns to ice but energy cannot die.

      • Anonymous

        I figured some ignoramus would have a bright comment. 

        • Anonymous

          ya do you you want to be the pot or the kettle?

    • Guest

      ….

      • Anonymous

        I don’t think I even remotely suggested that we just let people die.  I am talking about decisions & controlling our destiny while are minds are intact.

        • Guest

          ….

    • Anonymous

      A living will describes certain life prolonging treatments. You, the declarant, indicate which treatments you do or do not want applied to you in the event you either suffer from a terminal illness or are in a permanent vegetative state.  It does not allow anyone to legally commit suicide.  
      This means that if you suffer a heart attack, for example, a living will does not have any effect. You would still be resuscitated, even if you had a living will indicating that you don’t want life prolonging procedures. A living will is only used when your ultimate recovery is hopeless. 

      In this situation these people are not dead – they are old, disabled and need help with life’s tasks.  A living will would do not good even if it stated that they want food and water withheld if the become old and disabled.  A living will is not intended to provide anyone with legal permission to commit suicide.  Not even if assisted by a physician – remember  Dr. Kevorkian.  He too had great compassion for those who suffered from terminal illness that would rather die than be a helpless burden to others.  

      A living will’s intent is to take the burden off of family members and not make them have to make the choice about whether or not to take a person off of life support.   So, I’m not sure what you’re trying to say because a living will would not apply to these folks and they could very well have one in place.  

      • Anonymous

        you can refuse to eat and they can’t do anything about it. And family members have a right to refuse for them, if the loved one can’t do it for themselves. I have had family member that stayed home to die and those who have gone to nursing homes. Keeping loved ones at home, can cause a lot of pressure on a family, and in fighting, the one that won’t help have the most the to say about the care. My mother in-law wanted to be in the nursing home, she felt she had 24 hour maid service. it was her money 120,000.00 10 months of care.

        • Anonymous

          Not everyone who is elderly, disabled and needs assistance wants to die. Yes, people can refuse to eat or drink. I feel bad that your family member felt they were too much of a burden that they starved and dehydrated themselves to death. That is suicide and it goes against nature… like purposefully remaining in a burning building and allowing yourself to inhale smoke and choke to death or holding yourself under water until you drown. Sure, anyone can commit suicide that but that has nothing to do with a living will or being prepared in old age.

          You absolutely cannot put into a living will that you would like others to starve you to death or to dehydrate you to death or cause your death in any manner.   That means even family members cannot direct anyone to starve or dehydrate their relatives. Anyone who causes a person’s death intentionally is committing a felony – 1st degree murder or assisted suicide. Where do you get this stuff that it’s okay to do that?  

          No medical staff member or member of an assisted living facility or hospital is ever going to purposely kill anyone. It’s illegal to commit homicide and permission from a family member or living will just isn’t a legitimate reason to kill anyone. A living will is simply not for this purpose.  

          A living will is made to express the wishes of a person in the event they become incapable of living without life support. For example in the event they are hooked to a machine that breathes for them because they cannot breathe for themselves or hooked to a machine to make their heart beat because without the life support their heart would not beat on it’s own, etc… These organs would shut down naturally if the person were not hooked up to machines. THAT is what a living will directs – not assisted suicide. Being old, being sick or senile are simply not enough reason to resort to the use of a living will. It simply does not apply when a person is capable of living without life support.

          • Odalisque

            Actually, it does not go against nature, it goes against societal, cultural or religious rules. Animals, and humans are animals, often know when it is their time to die, and they find a place to do that in a quiet peaceful way. In some cultures, when elderly people knew that they were a burden to their clan, they would do exactly this – walk off and find a place to lie down and down. In other cultures, people just turn their face to the wall or lie down and refuse to continue. It is  cultural, societal, or religious beliefs that tell you this is wrong. We may struggle to survive when we are not ready to die, but when we know we are ready to die, well, we should be able to.  Sometimes when we are forced to stay alive because that is what society, culture, or religion require, we are forced to endure unspeakable pain and indignity.  Elderly people know that they are at the end of life. Some may think they can deny the grim reaper and do everything they can to continue on; others would rather go with as much dignity as possible. We should be able to.

            Living wills are different in different states. Here it is called an advance health-care directive. Mine says that I do not want to prolong life if I have an incurable or irreversible condition that will result in death in a short time; or that I become unconscious, and to a reasonable degree of medical certainty will not regain consciousness; or the likely risk and burdens of treatment would outweigh expected benefits. Artificial nutrition and hydration are to be withdrawn because of my decision to not prolong life. I don’t know where  your information comes from, but I sure as hell hope that my directive is followed. My husband and family members will do everything they can to make sure it is.

          • Anonymous

            Well said. Any body who has watched, an elderly person suffer the pain of living when they do not wish to, knows that death is a blessing. I will always advocate for death with dignity;
            there is not dignity in be force fed, there is no dignity in laying , in bed with no mind. Why anyone would think it was, is beyond me.

          • Anonymous

            The key word is being kept alive by ‘artificial” means… like a respirator or other life support machine.  Anything else, such as simply choosing not eat or drink after having a stroke is making a decision to cause your own death.  It’s really not much different from choosing to jump in a river and drown or down a bottle of pills… making that choice to die is always suicide regardless of the age, illness or reason.  

            I stand corrected that it does not go against nature to go off and die.  I totally agree with you that it does not go against nature,  it goes against societal, cultural and religious rules.  I also think it’s a shame about that. Remember Dr. Kevorkian who assisted the elderly with terminal illness to die by injection?  Although he was found guilty of murder I understood what he did and why.  Actually I believe it was quite humane.  

            But, this thread started out with me responding to someone saying that if only people in nursing homes who depend on medicare would just write a living will that we wouldn’t have this problem of spending so much on the elderly with terminal illnesses in nursing homes.  I still don’t agree with that statement because it assumes that a lot of people in nursing homes would rather die than depend on medicare.  That’s too big of an assumption for me… but you are right about choosing to die going against society and not nature. 

          • Anonymous

            I agree that living wills are different in different states. Every word of you offered from yours makes perfect sense to me.  What I’ve been saying is that a living will is not going to be evoked until after you can no longer make a decision for yourself and at a time when you require some form of resuscitation, defibrillation or life support.   The poster said her mother-in-law had a stroke and was of sound mind until she starved herself to death because she did not want to be a burden on others.  I understand this, I do.  But… it’s not much different from a teenager who believes they are a burden and makes a decision to starve themselves to death – the only difference being they are not yet of legal age to make that decision for themselves.  

            As far as starving or dehydrating yourself to death being natural… that is another subject.  But my initial reaction would be not always.  Young women of adult age starve themselves all the time… lots of people take their own lives because they believe they are a burden to others… it’s not always true or natural.  The method of death – starvation, dehydration is really not all that different from jumping off a bridge into a raging river and drowning oneself to end life.   Don’t forget – living wills are not just for the elderly and they are not just about old people choosing to die.  
            What I responded to initially was a poster who said that the medicare problem would not exist if the elderly had planned ahead and made a living will indicating that they should die.  First, that assumes the elderly in assisted living facilities don’t have living wills – they very well may have them.  Second it implies that most, if not all of the elderly, should want to die to save taxpayers the high cost of medicate- I disagree with this… it’s people telling the elderly that they should assume they are going to be a burden to taxpayers and should choose to die.  That’s just wrong.  That’s what I responded to… and I don’t think lack of living wills is the problem or would change anything related to the cost of medicare. 

          • Anonymous

            Wasn’t  there a woman who worked in a local nursing home who was caught trying to smother a patient with a pillow?

          • Anonymous

            look, I worked in the industry for 25 years, I have had family members that choose not to eat. My mother-in-law, chose to died, and my husband, and I respected her wishes. Stopping eating is part of the natural process, You can put what ever you want in a living will; feeding someone who does not what to be feed is against the law. You should look up

            patients rights, they can refuse any care they what to. Not a damn thing can be done about it. My mother-in-law wanted to died, because she had, had a stroke, it was her choice, she had her mind until the end.

          • Anonymous

            I will say this only one more time… I don’t know how else to make you understand. Putting “do not feed” in a living will is a waste of paper. It means NOTHING when included in a living will.  A living will is NOT for the purpose of directing a method of intentional suicide. 
            A living will is solely for the purpose of instructing medical personnel what to do in the event the patient is dead unless kept alive by a machine.  It relates only to life sustained by artificial means.  That is very different from a desire to starve to death, a desire to have a lethal injection or a desire to die by any stated means.  A living will isn’t even active until the person is dead unless on life support. 

          • Anonymous

            Feeding someone who refuses food is against the law! Look it up I dare you. I don’t post on these pages unless I know what I’m talking about! force feeding is a heroic measure.

          • Anonymous

            I don’t disagree with you on that… what I disagree with you is when a living will is evoked and how it can be used.  Like I said – living wills relate to life support in the event a person is in a vegetative state or otherwise unresponsive and cannot make a decision at the time of the event.  (This means anyone – not just the elderly) Life support includes feeding tubes, respirators and all things that keep a person alive who would otherwise die without them. 

            A living will is not permission for a doctor to assist people in taking their own life if the person is able to live without life support and is of sound mind and possesses the current ability to make decisions for themselves.  Your mother-in-law made a decision to stop eating and you said she was of sound mind right down to the end.  This does not describe a person who cannot make a decision and requires life support.  This describes a person who would rather die than be a burden on those that they love.  Yes, people do this – even teenagers do this because they feel they are a burden to someone for whatever reason and would rather die than be a burden.  It is suicide and a living will would not come into play for those of adult age until they could no longer make a decision for themselves and required life support to remain alive.  More than likely a doctor would discharge a person of sound mind after they’ve treated them for having a stroke and there is nothing more that can be done but they would not participate in aiding a person of sound mind to starve themselves to death at a time when they do not require life support to live.  Nor would they force feed them. They would bring them food and water and if they eat it… fine, if they don’t… fine. As long as they are not in a state where they can no longer make that decision the hospital would continue to bring them food and let them decide whether or not to eat it. A living will is not going to be evoked as long as they are able to make a decision.

            That said, we’ve gone way off topic so let’s go back to what I originally responded to. It was a comment that suggested that the elderly who now depend on medicare should have planned better when they were younger and had a living will in place because if they had done this we would not have so many elderly people needing medicare.  THAT  is ridiculous.  First of all it assumes that the elderly don’t have a living will and then it  blames the elderly for needing medicare. It additionally implies that the elderly should want to die rather than live.  It suggests they could have chosen to die to spare us the cost of medicare. That kind of comment is ICY COLD… totally disrespectful of the elderly and I completely disagree with the poster!

        • Anonymous

          My Mom used to say that pneumonia was a “gift” for someone in the last days of their cancer battle. Sometimes only providing physical and emotional comfort and letting something like pneumonia cause death would be more humane.

    • Anonymous

      I agree, I can make those decisions for myself after talking things over with my family, my clergy, and my doctor. But I can not, and society can not, make those decisions for some one else. No one can tell me that I must have a particular treatment and no one can tell me that I cannot have the treatment. That’s why living wills are so critical. If we all make those decisions for ourselves than over time there will be less intervention at the end of life. But there is no east fix for this.

    • Anonymous

      There are people in nursing homes who have not had extra measures taken to keep them alive and they have to live in a nursing home. We can’t leave them outside in the winter to die. One of the nursing homes residents told me he overheard the RN’s discussing how much to do for someone who didn;t want extreme measures taken to keep him alive. The RN’s didn’t know what was meant by extreme measures, should they give the person oxygen? Shouldn’t an RN working in a nursing home be well versed in this area?

  • Guest

    Tax the rich appropriately and there will be no problems. Keep giving them tax breaks. You will have only rich living and eating.

    • Anonymous

      Yes….the problem right now is that all many of these people replying think that they are rich and are going to have their taxes raised.  They don’t understand that they are not rich ard are paying way more taxes than the rich are…..  They are afraid for actually knowing the facts and acting accordingly.

  • Anonymous

    Perfect solution, It will save on these costs as well as social security: Soylent green at 75. We would actually generate revenue!

    But seriously, I have absolutely nothing to contribute for ideas as far as making this more efficient. In China the older people live with their children until they die, and in this country our older generations tend to live with far bigger houses and expenses than they really need to. People in this country also tend not to get along with their families very well which is unfortunate…

    • Anonymous

      as a single working woman i took care of my elderly parents in my home for 5 months until a place opened in a nursing home. it was the most scary unsafe 5 months ever. stove burners left on, medications taken several times to many in one day, slipping in the bathtub, its just not an answer in American life. my folks gave to their community their entire lives, making little money, having no property. their reward was to be warehoused in a nursing home environment with untrained receptionists counted towards the state mandated level of caregivers per resident. as MaineCare recipients, they had no choice in their care and got to keep all of $40.00 a month of their SS. my dad died in this environment, my mom now has been moved into the skilled care level. she has dementia and it is new to her every day. the caregivers at this level are more skilled, and i would not want their job for all the money in the world god bless them. personally, i want to be able to check out of this world on my own schedule, thank you very much.

      • I have been taking care of my Pop (BTW, he did not raise me) for 6 years. He has dementia, heart disease, diabetes, kidney failure with dialysis and COPD. We prepare all of his meals which are dictated by his very strict diet. We bath and dress him. We give him his meds 8x a day. We rarely get a nights full sleep because he has sundowner’s syndrome and spends many nights wandering the house and calling for help, and now this behavior is presenting during the daylight hours.

        We will soon have to place him in a long term facility and it will be the hardest decision I will ever have to make in my life, and I have had some doozies in the past. I know that no matter where he goes he will not get the correct care to keep him “healthy” and that he will be dead in a short time. And the time he does have will be frightening and painful for him. How does it happen that this is the choice we are left with?

        Personally, having lived through this chapter in my life as well as having cared for others over the years in a care facility, I would never ever begrudge one penny of my taxes going to care for an elder who can no longer care for themselves. Perhaps if we take Mr LePage to a nursing home and require him to work there for a month he may have other ideas about what is an appropriate cost for end of life care. Or, better yet, let’s send him and elder to care for with the understanding that he will get no outside help to care for that person. He must be there by his guest’s side 24/7, no matter what other things come up in his life that need his attention. I would give him a week before he found that money that he says the state doesn’t have.

        • Anonymous

          I like you care for a elderly parent.  He is still attempting to live on his own but it is heart wrenching. My wife and I know there is a time coming when he will have to come live with us — when he is ready. My heart goes out to you and the others we have not heard from. We are fortunate to have an extended community family so hopefully I will not have to make the decision to place him in a long term facility.

          For those of you that have not made this journey yet do not be to quick to verbalize your uneducated opinion. If you come from a true family you may have to walk this same path.

          From what we have heard Mr LePage was not fortunate enough to have a true family so he has no basis to understand where this all comes from. Perhaps you are right — if he would volunteer some his time in a long term facility — and I speaking of days and nights not just a drive through — maybe he would look at this situation in a different way.

           

    • Anonymous

      One of the biggest problems in this country, as I see it, is that we keep people alive BECAUSE WE CAN!  Modern medicine has some incredible life-saving measures, including keeping total vegetables alive.  But, for what purpose?  Quality of life should be a factor, but it seems to not be.

      • Anonymous

        That would be the disadvantage to our advanced medicine. Unfortunately there’s really nothing you can do, I mean, who wants to die before they have to?

        • Anonymous

          Some people want the right to choose not to have to live the life they are consigned by age, disability and inability to have any quality.  Why should they not be the “deciders”?  It’s not “die before they have to” — it’s “die when they want to”.

          • Anonymous

            Hey choices in life are a luxury, life is hard and painful but that’s how it is, you can sometimes manage it ok but a lot of people lose control pretty easily

        • pbmann

          I want to live as long as life is enjoyable.  If I am no longer able to do anything but lie around and wait for death to take then I want the right to end my life on my terms not yours.

          • Anonymous

            I’m not advocating making those choices for people, but when you look at it from a management perspective its funny how it comes up a lot, and people are quick to sacrifice human liberty for money.

  • Anonymous

    Just take care of you oun sick parents and grandparents and no one will have to raise you taxes….Or you could get a living will and have the hospital just withhold food and water form you so you die?

    • Anonymous

      It would be wonderful if we could all do just that.  Unfortunately, as wunceinabluemoon pointed out, it’s not always safe to do so.  My grandmother was at the point where we couldn’t care for her anymore.   She became immobile and we had to make the very difficult decision to put in her a nursing home.  I think MOST people would care for their aging parents if were at all possible to do so.  Unfortunately, that’s always the case.  We were very lucky to find a wonderful nursing home that kept grandma safe and comfortable and fed her well up until her death.  The ones we need to take the benefits from are not the elderly, IMO.  It’s the ones 20-5o year olds who decide to bring children into the world and make them society’s responsibility.

      • Anonymous

        It wouldn’t make one bit of difference.  Many family’s work, pay taxes and receive wellfare bennifits as are underemployed, but you can keep on believing that woman just have children to live off the State.

        • Anonymous

          I’m not saying that at all so please do not misconstrue my words.  I doubt their intentions of having a baby are to live off the state.  They choose to have babies and so many these days don’t even pay attention to the costs of raising a child.  Why?  Because our society takes care of them if they can’t do it on their own.  But I do wonder if it would make a difference.  Do you have reliable sources?

        • Guest

          ….

      • Anonymous

        Point well taken, what is your stance on abortion for these wanton women you so deride?

        • Guest

          ….

          • Anonymous

            My thoughts exactly.  I know birth control is not 100% effective, but it’s pretty darn close these days.  I’m 40 and haven’t had any unplanned pregnancies to date.

          • Guest

            ….

          • Anonymous

            Do you believe in forced sterilization for all unmarried women who have one child already, or would you advocate for forced vasectomies for all unemployed men?

          • Guest

            ….

        • Anonymous

          I hate abortions, but I’m pro-choice because I don’t believe I should tell someone else how to live their lives.  I would never have one myself.  What is your stance on birth control?  I’m pro birth control

      • Guest

        I totally agree. If you, yourself, cannot support your children then please do not have them. Do not bring an unwanted child into this world so you can get more Tanif each month. The free ride needs to come to an end for you. 

    • You want to pay the outrageous costs of prescription drugs? 

      You are obviously not seeing the whole picture.

      • Anonymous

        And you have it framed and hanging on the wall

    • Anonymous

      I took care of my Mother and My Father, myself.  Why because I lived them and I could. My Mother had dementia and I had to care for her 24-7 as she could not be left alone. She was as helpless as an infant.

    • Anonymous

      TROLL!!

  • 120 grand a year to keep an 88 year old alive so she can talk to herself?  dear god nowonder why this state is headed to hell.

    • Anonymous

      what would you do if she were your mother, or your wife?

      • Or him(her)self?

      • Anonymous

        Euthanasia

      • Anonymous

        let them died

      • do you THINK i want to see my mother in that state?  eff no.  my grandmother had alzhiemers so i am very familiar with old people being alive but not being “there” mentally and it is not worth keeping them alive so long.

        • Anonymous

          Your preferred method of NOT “keeping them alive so long” = what? Would you go in and shoot the 88-year-old in the article, or would you prefer to poison her or strangle her with your bare hands?

          Or would letting LePage deny her nursing home care be sufficient (probably the latter, since you wouldn’t have to stand there and watch her die–it would bedone by others).

        • Anonymous

          I don’t presume to think anything about your thoughts, that’s why i asked the question. So, want to join forces and start an assisted suicide campaign in Maine?

    • Anonymous

      Yepper should have keep the old tradition to strand them on an Ice burg and send em off floating down the river. 

    • Anonymous

      End of life care consumes the majority of medical expenses in the entire country. But any talk of limiting end of life care is paraphrased as “death panels”. The US population simply does not have the fortitude to deal with this issue, wich is fortunate for the insurance companies and medical industry, because they stand to profit hugely from it.

    • Anonymous

      Are you sure it’s the state that’s headed for hell, and not people who think an 88-year-old is worthless and deserves to die because she has dementia?

  • Anonymous

    We humanely euthanize our beloved companion animals when the dignity of their lives has become a thing of their past.  But, we won’t do the same for our beloved humans.  I vote for the Oregon law.  I will be the first to sign up!  Whose life is it anyway?  The State’s?  NO!  Some churches’?  NO!  It’s MINE!

    • Anonymous

      Yep it maybe yours! and for you to decide, “but would you want someone else to decide it for you, not feed you not take care of you when you couldn’t.  How about your Mother or Father should we all stop take care of them?  Can you afford to take care of them yourself? 

      • Anonymous

        neither my father or mother, want to be force to eat, When my husbands mother, stopped eating, and drinking, we told them they could try to feed her, if she would not open her month that was it,
          No pouring food in her mouth. You people do know it’s cruel to keep someone alive, just to say they are living.
        I worked in nursing homes for year, poured food down peoples throats, and cleaning them up when it came out the other end. I assure you that is not living, it’s existing, at best. And also the 10,000.00 a month is no myth, it cost that for a, privet pay room 12 years ago. I know that for a fact.

      • Anonymous

        My mother and father are deceased.  My husband has also passed and had absolute say over what happened as he neared death.  My strong wishes are also well known.  You see nothing but black and white and your screen name shows that.  There can be Death with Dignity and those who choose it should have their wishes respected.

  • Anonymous

    They may be the most costly, but most of them probably haven’t mooched off the system for their entire lives.  The elderly and disabled need the care.  Although the costs per recipient may be far lower for someone in their 20s, 30s, 40s, I wonder exactly how much the TOTAL costs are as compared to the elderly.  It seems we have a very large amount of folks in this day and age who are choosing to become baby-making factories, not bother to get married, let the father’s ignore their child support payments, and live off the state.  I bet if we could cut ENOUGH of those moochers out of the system, we’d be able to still take care of the elderly and keep the state from going under.  

    • Guest

      ….

      • Anonymous

        You bet.  I’m sure it doesn’t add up to what the end-of-life care is costing, but I’m sure it couldn’t hurt to get rid of them.  And to be honest, I would be quite interested in seeing the figures.  Although it’s not thousands at a time, I know a few of these folks (they rent our rental properties), they are at the doctors at the first sign of a cold or anything else, unlike those of us who pay our own doctor’s visits.  That has to add up.

        • Guest

          ….

        • Anonymous

          I like the way you think! Are you single by chance?

          • Anonymous

            Not sure if this post was to me or not (my dashboard says it is, this post doesn’t show who you’re replying to).  In any case, thanks for your compliments, but  no, I’m not single LOL  Married for 22 years and have a 20 and 18 year old sons who my husband and I have proudly raised on our own, not by mooching off the state :)

          • Anonymous

            Yes it was. I was just trying to emphasize how nice it is to read such intelligent comments on here. BTW I’m married to. LOL

      • Anonymous

        Men make babies too

        • Anonymous

          That is right and the state should demand that the woman provide the name of the father of her child.  If she is unwilling to do that, then the state should withhold the support she asks for.  If young men would be held liable for the children they create, they might decide it is better to keep their zippers up.

          • Anonymous

            The state requires that the woman getting TANF provide the name of the absent parent. If she says she was raped then she has to provide verification, such as, a  police report when it happened, as proof of the rape.

        • Guest

          ….

    • Anonymous

      Those 20-50 probably only require preventative and catastrophic coverage that dooesn’t begin to add up to end of life care. Mainecare also keeps those working without employer coverage from going bankrupt due to a medical catastrophy.

      • Anonymous

        I’d be quite interested to see some reliable figures.  I’m sure it doesn’t add up to the same amount, perhaps not even close, but I bet it would make me even more grumpy about supporting the moochers of the system.  If you do have any figures that are from a reliable source, I’m quite interested in seeing them.

        • Anonymous

          The medical cost for the moochers  is just the tip of the iceberg. There is the amount of the TANF grant, food stamps, housing, tract phones, emergency assistance from DHHS, GA from the local town or city, extra help for the kids, such as case managers from agencies because their childhood has been so poor, methodone, rides to medical appts from Lynx. It never ends!!!

          • Anonymous

            That’s right!  Our government is encouraging irresponsibility if you ask me

      • Oh, you will still become bankrupt and in many cases homeless because you have lost your income. If you don’t have small children you get no money from the state and trying to get help from your town or city is like pulling teeth, something that most with catastrophic illnesses are not able to tolerate. It can take years to get the social security disability insurance that you paid for your entire working life. So you see, more than likely those with such catastrophies in their lives do become destitute. But at least they can get medical care…for now.

    • Anonymous

      nope, these people are just a small drop in the big bucket of water…  even if everyone of these people were droped it wouldn’t even amout to a yellow hole in a snow bank… 

    • Anonymous

      I have no problem paying for nursing home care for our senior Mainers.  It is the people coming to Maine for our “welfare program”.  I hear it all the time, patients from out of state now living in Maine, when asked why they moved here their response  is “Your welfare system, it is the easiest in the country.”  States like Tenn, Tx, Kentucky will give their welfare recipients bus tickets to Maine.  THIS is where we have to make changes.  Don’t take it away from the elderly who have worked and supported this state their entire lives. 

  • Anonymous

    This story is sure to stir up resentment from the usual crowd who call Medicaid/MaineCare an entitlement game. Why is it perfectly acceptable and legal for millionaires/billionaires to take advantage of loopholes in our tax code that allow them to keep the very funds that could be used to pay down America’s debt? How long are we going to lose tax dollars that could  close the DHHS’ budget gap?
     I refer you to BDN’s January 26, 2012 issue, page A7, George Will’s column where he states that GOP candidate Romney’s tax returns “…..testify to no more than sophisticated exploitation of the baroque tax code’s opportunities for–even encouragement of–tactics to minimize liabilities.”  How can we voters tolerate policies and politics that call for cut backs to medical care for our most vulnerable people when there is money out there that we allow to slip through our grasp? How long are we going to close one eye and blink the other? 

  • Anonymous

    Up to this point, there is nothing “cautious” or “intellectual” about the administration’s approach.   As if this data is new data.

    • Anonymous

      Nope the data come out twice a year and can be found at the Margaret Chase Smith Web site…

  • Anonymous

    If I’m ever as bad off as Lillian please kill me.  Seriously. 

  • hasacluemaine

    Unfortunates like Brown cost $1,013 a day to be kept in a community setting. Deinstitonalization was needed for about 80% of those with intellectual disabilities, but not the other 20%. Some people can never be safely integrated into the general populace, because they will always remain a danger to themselves and others. A more rational approach would be a return to medical model of care that congregates these type of folks.

    • Anonymous

      I agree with you 100 percent

    • Warehousing like we used to you mean?

  • PabMainer

    “Senior citizens with multiple health problems living in a long-term health facility” = “fit the profile of MaineCare’s most costly recipients”……..and fit the category (IMHO) of being one of the most deserved to receive such benefit……these dear folks, along with those of any age who have significant health needs, disabilities or mental needs of significance that diminish a quality of life lost due to said illness, are those that the system should support…..those adults of any age, unless retired, that are physically able to work and be a productive member of society, and those that “use” the system as a substitute for work, are the one’s that deserve a close look and assessment as to their true “needs” and deserved benefits……

    • Anonymous

      The other half of this equation are Children…Do you think we should repeal Child Labor Laws….make em work?  Great Idea….. 

      • Anonymous

        I think we should hold the sperm donors and uterine hotel owners accountable for taking care of their offspring :)  

      • PabMainer

        Ah, another trying to tell me how I think…..if you actually read and comprehend you will notice that I specifically spoke to those of any age that have legit needs……and what do child labor laws have to do with being eligible to receive benefits??

  • Anonymous

    If I ever become like this I would surely welcome a bullet to the head.  I would argue that’s it’s actually INhumane to let someone like this live.

    • Anonymous

      Well,  given your unfeeling condition, isn’t today a good day to die ? 

      B’bye. 

      • Anonymous

        What does being unfeeling have to do with anything?  And for that matter, how is it unfeeling to want to die rather than lead a miserable existence?  Isn’t ending someone’s suffering a GOOD thing??

        • Anonymous

          Voltron1… Valgirl10… you look so much  like.

    • Anonymous

      “Letting them live” = providing food, shelter, and medical care.

      Where would you start with your reforms–would you starve this 88-year-old, leave her outdoors in January, or deny her all medical treatments?

      When your plan is in action, would you be wanting to stand beside her and watch her die, or  have others do it?

  • Anonymous

    How much money has the state received from peoples property?  If someone is on Mainecare owns property the state forces the sale of the property and money goes back to the state.  Is there a list of the properties sold and how much the state has gotten back?  Granted sometimes the state never gets back what they spent but there are many other times that the state gets every penny they spent.  It would be nice to get the whole story for once.

  • Guest

    First off, 10,000.00 monthy is outrageous. Let’s get the bill more in line with the services being rendered. They push her wheelchair under a table to contain her…..really for 10,000.00 a month. this is just the tip of the iceberg of what is wrong with our health coverage in this country. Obama care is really making a difference I see……right!!!!!

    • Anonymous

      Obama had nothing to do with it…  Everyone is under the impression that insurnace covers longterm care and it does not.  Long term nursing home care is paid for 100 percent by either the individual or by mainecare.  Mecicare has nothing to do with it at all.  In other words the individual pays all of his or her social secruity to live in a Nursing Home execpt for about $40.00 and Mainecare covers the rest of what the individual can’t pay out of pocket.  If the individual has properity that properity must be sold inorder to re-pay mainecare. 

    • Anonymous

      your pants are in flames.

      this has nothing to do with obama at all

    • Anonymous

      First off, 10,000.00 monthy is outrageous. 

      This is what you got for privatization. 

  • Anonymous

    First of all the baloney in this article is sickening.  It costs 10,000 a month for her room at the nursing home. Ok probably a huge exaggeration but anyways keep going… further down she’s on Medicare too…. further down MaineCare picks up what Medicare doesn’t.  Ok so which is it MaineCare is footing the 10,000 a month or MaineCare is footing the % Medicare doesn’t. OR it’s just one big fat lie by the whiners that want LePage out of there so they can keep their free insurance to go get their methadone every day?? Yea… that’s what I thought. BDN stop falling for the baloney these dopers are feeding you.  It only makes your newspaper look gullible  at the very least!

    • Medicare does not pay for long term care. They will pay for a rehab stay after an illness up to 30 days. Medicaid pays for the facility charges. Medicare pays for medical care, medications and whatever rehabilitative adjuncts they might approve in certain circumstances: like speech or physical therapy. Of course medicare does not pay the full amount of those products or services so medicaid picks up the rest.

    • Anonymous

      Last time we looked at the numbers for a family member, the least expensive “custodial care” was $250 a day.  That was three years ago.

    • Anonymous

      It is not an exaggeration…long term care REALLY costs that much. Perhaps you should be wondering why healthcare should cost that much rather than thinking up a grand conspiracy to make LePage look bad.

      • Anonymous

        Um, it doesn’t take much of a conspiracy to make LePage look bad. He does that on his own.

    • Anonymous

      You’re not alone–many people believe that Medicare will pay their nursing home costs. It does NOT.

  • Anonymous

    Some people are more sick than others…

  • To the people you say “take care of your own sick parents.”  Uhm hello….  Most people have to work during the day (or night shifts) so who would be home then to take care of the elderly?
    Let’s all stop and THINK for a second before blabbing out a statement.  Elderly like the lady in this article needs 24 hour a day supervision. And she didn’t get this way by choice. so don’t even think about blaming the elderly for needing care.

    • Anonymous

      Yes Jake.  Im sorry if you have missunderstood.  That is the point.  “We must take care of our elderly as well as the sick, disabled and the poor, because that is what it means to live in a society.”    

    • Anonymous

      why don’t you think before you blab? who took care of you 24/7? It also bothers me that some people don’t Have any problem killing an un born baby but want me to pay their bills. You libs keep up the good work!

  • Anonymous

    after age 80 every one should get lethal enjection…

    • Anonymous

      really???????????????

    • Guest

      ….

    • Anonymous

      I hope you are kidding!!!!!  The elderly have so much to offer!  Some of my most valued like lessons were from a 90 year old and a 96 year old.  I am against lethal injection (note the spelling) for any reason even for people with your mind set.  Much of the system could change for the better with common sense and caring instead of such cruel thoughts.

    • Anonymous

      Whose really in favor of death panels ? 

    • Anonymous

      And all IGNORANT people too!

  • honey777

    Thank you again, BDN, for printing the truth.  It is NOT people committing welfare fraud who account for MaineCare debt. 

    • Anonymous

      At $10,000/month for nursing home care, SOMEONE is committing welfare fraud!

      • Anonymous

        no, this is what a private paying person paid at brewer rehab a yr ago. too bad they didn’t get the care that should command $10,000 monthly

  • Guest

    So if the  5% are incurring the most cost Does this mean  death panels will deny them care to prolong life  in the future under  Barry Care ?

    • Anonymous

      What are you talking about under Barry Care.  This problem is nothing new, in fact the proplem is going to get worse as there is not enough people of working age to support the elderly at the end of life.  That is why America has to bring in foreign people to work and pay taxes.  That is the reason why woman need to have these large family’s, because your Social security does depend on the working class people who are paying into the system…

    • Anonymous

      Take a look at the Comments here. Looks to me like the people who favor slashing MaineCare and telling these elderly folks to hurry up and die are all LePage supporters.

      • Anonymous

        Has nothing to do with support or non-support of MaineCare.  People in favor of slashing MaineCare realize we cannot indefinitely continue to pay $10,000/month for dementia patients. 

  • Anonymous

    There should be no threat, real ,fabricated or percieved,  to anyone who recieves Maine Care benefits, who is truly disabled, and/or  elderly and has NO alternatives. 

    • Anonymous

      Here’s the problem I see with your statement, Kathy, and I don’t want to sound mean, but we ALL know we are going to grow old, if we are lucky.  We might not go to college, we might not get married, we might not have kids, but every day we grow 24 hours older.
      THEREFORE, it BEHOOVES each of us to plan for our old age and NOT rely on the government.  And government programs have always been intended to be SUPPLEMENTS, not REPLACEMENTS for our own longterm plans.

      • Anonymous

        Ya xxskier, so please tell us all how you have prepaired for your end of life care?

        • Anonymous

          I purchased a variety of insurance policies when my friends were buying new cars.

          • Anonymous

            LOL!! Yea, that’s going to save you!

          • Anonymous

            Well, in my 60’s and looking good.  I also bought fixer-upper real estate and invested sweat equity, purchased an annuity which increases in value without any additional investment income from me, and got disability insurance.  Your solution appears to be the same as Ms Davies–the government will step in to help those who can’t or won’t help themselves.  LOL!!!  Yea, THAT’S going to save you!

          • Anonymous

            You will only continue to have those policies if you can keep paying the premiums. If you lose your job, cannot find another, and are not a millionaire, you might find yourself having to choose between paying the premiums and putting food on the table. Then you yourself will need the government programs that LePage and his cronies are hoping to gut.

            If any of your kids or  grandkids is ever born disabled, or becomes disabled, they will need these programs.

          • Anonymous

            Absolutely untrue.  I have an annuity that grows at an excellent rate that I do not put an additional penny into.  I purchased disability insurance, bought real estate (fixer uppers) which I put lots of sweat equity into which now return rental income. 
            Your solution is “the government will have to take care of me because I have done nothing for myself.”  Yeah, sure, as Smarty pants says, that’s going to save you!

          • Anonymous

            You’re assuming that anyone who expresses concern that the future might NOT be rosy has done nothing to prepare.

            My husband and I have retirement accounts, other investments, long-term care policies, regular health insurance, and pensions (including one from my husband’s Navy career). He’s retired but I’m still working 45-50-hour weeks in my mid-sixties.

            We have a bit more foresight than you. We’re aware that the best-laid plans can collapse unexpectedly, as the stock market did a few years ago, and as my husband’s Navy income and our Social Security will do if the Republicans get their mitts on them.

            We have a disabled adult daughter with a genetic deletion syndrome, and we’re aware that Republican plans to shred the social safety net may threaten her security as she gets older (we don’t expect to live forever).

            We’re aware that my husband or I, or our other child and grandchildren, could become disabled at any moment from a devastating illness or injury, requiring expensive care that  insurance policies don’t cover… we might need to cash in our retirement savings to help with expenses.

            And guess what? The same could happen to you. Because you believe that you and the ones you love are invulnerable, that no catastrophe can strike, you hope to shred the social safety net–which you and your loved ones might just need one day. Bad things do happen to good people, including those who assume they’re fully prepared.

          • Anonymous

            Soory, Liz, I remain unmoved by your “dilemma.”   We will all technically be “disabled” some day if we live long enough.  The government has already provided a solution for you should you incur medical costs that are devastating.  It’s called bankruptcy.

          • Anonymous

            It’s not just my dilemma, friend. It’s also YOUR dilemma.

            YOU could incur devastating medical costs. YOU could find yourself in bankruptcy. You could wind up penniless in old age if not earlier.

          • Anonymous

            No, Lizzie, sorry, not true.  Try as you might, your reliance on the government to support you in your old age and the risk that the taxpayers will revolt is YOUR dilemma. I am all set.

          • Anonymous

            Dear xxskier,

            Thank you so much for putting the Republican Delusion into far better words than I ever could have done.

          • Anonymous

            Thank you, Ms Davies, for putting into words the Democratic Delusion, which is the that the taxpayers can continue to pay indiscriminately and without limitations for 83 year old dementia patients and ADHD mood disorders. 

          • Anonymous

            You think ADHD is a mood disorder? LOL!

          • Anonymous

            BTW, lots of people called “disabled” and its a mood disorder.  GET REAL!

          • Anonymous

            “Only” a mood disorder… Like, perhaps, Bipolar I Disorder with psychotic features, Depressive Disorder with Psychotic features, suicidal depression…? Try any of those on for size and see how you feel.

          • Anonymous

            Yeah, sure, whatever, Liz.  And doctors (who are honest) will tell you the only effective treatment for many of these “disorder’ (for which you can be labeled “disabled’  LOL!!!) is exercise.  Wow.  What a concept.

          • Odalisque

            It is obvious that  you know nothing about which you speak with regard to “mood disorders”. Your supposed authority is doctors (who are honest)? Hmm. I would suggest that your authority is either doctors who are dishonest or ignorant of mental illness and its varied forms. Exercise does not cure such disorders – my son was an athlete when first diagnosed just as he turned 22. There is no real cure, only treatment. Often those treatments are extraordinarily expensive. My son does not have insurance because despite his efforts to find work and keep a job it is not easy when  you are mentally ill. Often even on medication your behavior is different enough for coworkers to feel uncomfortable around you. Often, even on medication, paranoia makes you fear those with whom you work. 

            My son does not live in Maine, but I will relate some relevant experiences.  With mental illness hospitalization can be an occasional or frequent occurrence.  Six years ago, a one-month stay for our son in the psych unit of a county hospital in Idaho cost the county indigent fund close to $70,000. A following two-month stay at the state hospital probably cost $100,000. Even with insurance one stay would be prohibitive for most working people or even middle class people to pay the balance after insurance. When someone can expect to make frequent visits to hospitals over a life span, you can see that it could potentially bankrupt even you.  If you were first ill at a very young age, you have not had the opportunity to build wealth or even purchase insurance. This is why state assistance is so vital for those who are disabled. It is also why allowing young adults up to the age of 26 on their parents’ health insurance is a very good idea.  Had this been the case for us, our son could have gotten treatment sooner and perhaps would not have required the hospitalizations at public expense.

            And medications? My son is on three medications – two of those are generics and priced such that in a crunch, we could pay the $300 a month, but the other medication, the one that takes care of his psychosis, costs $1,800 a month. That’s $2,100 a month for medication; $25,200 for one year.  You might say – well find a cheaper medication. Well, he has been on many other anti-psychotics, unfortunately, they did not work or they ceased to work over time.

            My son takes his meds; wants to work; wants respect, all the things others have in life.  When he loses one job, he immediately tries to find another. More than once he was hired  when in full-blown mania (although he would lose the job once it was determined by the employer that he was nuts). It is difficult given the aforementioned behavioral differences.  He is very intelligent, well educated, and motivated, but it is not so easy to find a job if you have a long unblemished  work history anymore. If your work history is spotted with interruptions you are even less likely to find employment.

            For those who think it is easy to get disability, our story is that it is not. My son’s psychologists, psychiatrist, and social worker have all tried to help him get disability, but he has been denied twice – once when he got out of the hospital and was still seriously impaired, the other time was just last year when he had prolonged psychosis and was, for the first time, suicidal – mainly over his concern about what was going to happen to him if he could not take care of himself.  He does not want to be on disability because he knows that it is not a lot of money to try to live on, but he knows it could help when he is seriously ill, which is more often that he or we would like.  He also wants respect and in our society it seems that only those who work are allotted that; but he  worries all the time about what is going to happen to him if he gets sick again. He worries about getting medication. He worries about the impact his illness has on his family.  We often feel impotent to help.  If we help this time, what if down
            the road, it is even more serious and we no longer have the money to
            help. We have daughters too, and they have children. One grandchild has a serious kidney condition, another one has Asperger’s syndrome as well as a serious behavioral disorder, both of which require treatment. What if we have to
            help them, too? And we are in our 60’s right about the time when everything starts to fall apart. That sort of thing. It is a constant fear and worry and a balancing act that we may find ourselves unable to handle over time.

            This type of life is very difficult. Those who experience it do not want to be mentally ill, but are unfortunate in parentage and genetic history. There are many people like my son in Maine.  They don’t want to be ill and did not seek it, they got stuck with the bad end of the gene pool.

            I know quite a few people who like you, thought nothing bad could happen to them because they had covered all the bases. I will relate two of those stories. My daughter’s best friend (in Montana)  lost her home and savings when her husband died of a  heart attack after surgery for a brain tumor – and they had  both health and life insurance. They were both hard line conservatives at the time, opposed to government assistance for people. Those who needed it were lazy, etc.  The widow has certainly changed her tune, and wants Medicare for all, now. I have another acquaintance (again in the west) who owned a business and lost it and his very nice home in his trials to see that his wife’s various medical conditions (similar to the woman in this story) were treated properly – and he thought he had good health insurance (through a small business group), too. My husband and I may once have thought, like  you,  that we had all the bases covered, but we are now cognizant of the frailty of security given what happened to our son at an early age  and others we know. All it takes is a serious medical crisis, an accident, or job loss in your family to destroy everything you have worked for. If you have not had the chance to build wealth and job history or security, you are really screwed. Even those who think they have prepared for everything, but who are of modest means, find that they can lose it all. 

            I hope for your sake that you do have all your bases covered and that you never have an accident; lose your job; or find yourself with serious illness.  There is, though, within all societies an unspoken contract; we work together to build a better future, not just for ourselves, but for those who follow. We may differ on the terms of that contract, but acknowledgment of it means that we recognize that we owe something to that society – to those who came before and built the structure on which we built our success, and to those who follow so that they can do the same.   To think that we owe nothing to anyone else is hubris. And as in Greek tragedy – with hubris inevitably comes a fall.

            Good luck.

  • Anonymous

    Ok, so here’s what happened to my grandfather back in 1970’s.  He was elderly and frail and did not want to go into a nursing home.  SO the entire extended family helped out.  I was in college, so it was my shift to watch him at night to make sure he didn’t get up and wander.  No feeding tubes, no forced feeding, no heroic measures.  And over the course of the last six months, he lost interest in food, and eventually stopped eating altogether.  Some nights he know who I was but by the end he could recall when he was six with extreme clarity.  Eventually he slipped into a coma and passed away.  His death was extremely peaceful and  dignified.  Was it a burden on us as family?  Only in the sense that some of us postponed certain choices to provide round the clock care.  I guess today people are too busy to take care of their own.

    • Anonymous

      1) some people do not have an extended family.

      2) being “too busy to take care of their own” generally includes having to keep your full-time job.

      • Anonymous

        Nobody quit their fulltime jobs.  We used cousins, grandkids, kids, and siblings. We all took shifts.  Was it complicated? At times.  A burden?  Never.  Those who worked during the day took an eight hour shift in the evening.  Those in school deferred classes.  One of my relatives took an extended unpaid leave and we all kicked in to compensate her to cover day shifts.  It’s called thinking outside the box.  Yeah, we all know, Lizzie, you got the only disabled kid in the world.  Well, guess what.  One of my relatives, Down’s syndrome, also had a shift.

  • Anonymous

    Oh here’s an other idea.  We could reoppen the orphanages so that when Mothers or Farthers are sick or can’t find Jobs or are just plain underemployed can just drop of the kids and froget about em.  We can staff the orphange with all the elderly that we can no longer afford to care for.  Kill two birds with one stone that way.

    • Anonymous

      Soylent Green

  • Anonymous

    We need some kind of fail-safe implant. So they cant get thier grubby paws on us if we do not wish them tooooo.

  • Anonymous

    Maxine lives in Maine?

  • Anonymous

    Why can’t we rely on our government for the help we need? Isn’t that the basis for Medicare and social security? Two fabulous programs that I PAY into over the course of my life so the help I need financially and medically will be there for me. 

  • Lord Whiteman

    In Florida they call these the million dollar deaths.

    • Anonymous

      That’s because all the older americans chose to retire in Florida

  • Anonymous

    There is a major percentage of the top 5% that abuse the system by getting prescribed narcotics making up every ailment possible just to feed a drug habit and generate an income. The state should temporarily hire some of these reformed junkies to tell them how they beat the system and how to identify the ones that are because clearly nothing is being done.

    • Anonymous

      No the Top 5% of Mainecare recipents are the elederly and serverly disabled…  “period”.  No wounder you aer a Bushfan.

      • Anonymous

        No they junkies. 
        It is  faith based thing. 

        lol

        • Anonymous

          Yep ok.  Well then I should hope these old folk get some help for their dependence.  Just look down through the comments, some of the Tax Payers think putting em to death is the answer.  Of course if LePage gets his tax cuts that what it will be anyway as they will all die because they no longer have nursing care or the drugs they are “adicted to”.  Go figure!

          • Anonymous

            Yeah, I saw that, too.
            Camps are always the less big government conservatives’ final solution.

    • Guest

      That is absolutley the most base-less thing I have ever heard. Maybe you meant 1/10 of 1 %

    • Guest

      ….

    • Anonymous

      You should tell everyone that you’re joking, and nobody would ever say anything that crazy unless it was a joke.

  • Anonymous

     “Top” five”” What are you people mo-rons? Top five percent of what???

     I believe what your title should have said was “Five percent of Maine care recipients account for  more then half of all costs.” 

     TOP five?? Once again reinforcing the opinion that the BDN  staff should Go back to the high school paper.

  • midmainer

    Rather than a slash and burn method of budget cutting that LePage is attempting to do, Maine should take a very very close look at the things they are being charged for and the rates for those things. Hospitals nationwide have a very bad habit of running up the bill when medicare and medicaid patients are being treated, Maine’s hospitals have been sticking it to cash paying customers as well as the government for years now, look close and you find millions of questionable charges, unnecessary tests and bloated fees. the amount of fraud from the states hospitals, doctors and medical billers will dwarf that of misuse by people on public assistance.

    • Anonymous

      Didn’t the Republican Speaker of the House, Nutting, defraud medicare for 3.6 million, and say it was just an honest mistake, but then didn’t pay it back. Just the fraud he got caught with would be enough to help 25-30 of these people.

  • Anonymous

     Until every homeless person is safe. Until every mentally ill person is taken care of  we should have no other priority. We subsidize whatever the favored project is while our own people suffer. The ONLY priority we should have is taking care of our own. Seeing to those that can’t help themselves and ensuring those able are given every opportunity. What that entails? Well that’s a lot of work but seeing good money thrown after bad over and over on IDEALISTIC ideas CAN NOT AND SHOULD NOT,  be any priority at all, as long as one person is seen VISIBLY suffering on the street as people walk past with disdain in their eyes. Now about some of you start caring as much about the people here now suffering as you do on some esoteric notion of what may happen and who is responsible WE’VE HAD ICE AGES IN THE PAST FOR A REASON. DO A LITTLE RESEARCH.
     Not suggesting the environment isn’t important but I wouldn’t spend two cents on it as long as we have PEOPLE OPENLY SUFFERING.

    • Anonymous

      You are so right

  • Anonymous

    Extrodinary measures should not be performed as a matter of course with people who are dying, 

    • Anonymous

      This woman is not living by extrodinary measures.  Did you see a ventilator attached to her?

  • Anonymous

    This is no surprise, and has been known for years. Years
    back it was promoted by the government as correct to move your elderly
    into nursing facilities in order to get around the clock competent care and
    remove burden. Before this many individuals were taken care of in most instances,
    ignored, or not cared in others while at home by relatives. So what’s the
    answer now Governor, more euthanasia? I think its time our leader was more
    forthright in his real motives, as this 5% deserves and now finds necessary (as
    the government conditioned everybody involved) requiring the services provided.
    The cost being runaway is a whole different issue that is a result of a demand
    for services in part and not recipients in majority milking the system. I have
    had two neighbors over the years pay for their spouses stays in nursing homes
    to the tune of $5,000.00 to $7,000.00 a month. It isn’t hard to figure when the
    state cuts how much they will pay, corporate run nursing home minds find other
    ways of passing on and through the costs in order to get the initial amount
    they asked for.

  • Anonymous

    Part of the problen these days are we don’t take care of each other as in the “old days”. Today, you become old, the family says I can’t handle this and they are put in homes. I’m not saying this is always the case, but it is easier to let the “pro’s” do it.

    • Anonymous

      In the “old days” most married women didn’t work outside the home, and so were around to provide care for elderly parents or other family members.

      • Anonymous

        They still are.  Most nursing homes are filled with Woman that have taken care of their husbands untill they have died.  Men often pass before Women.

    • Anonymous

      In the “old days” people used to die when they were in their early fifties. No problem

    • Anonymous

      Oh ya!  Could you take care of a love one that can’t care for their own most basic need?

      • Anonymous

        Not only “can I” but “I” have. Thank you

  • Anonymous

    Rep. Emily Cain noted the 5%/55% figure two weeks ago in the Maine Democrats radio address:

    http://www.dirigoblue.com/2012/01/weekly-democratic-radio-address-by-rep-emily-cain-orono-addressing-budget-shortfalls/

     This figure has been known for years, and in fact, it’s how pool insurance works – the many that don’t make many claims pay for the high cost of the few. It’s why Medicare was created in the 60’s, because seniors – who need more care – could no longer afford the premiums demanded by for-profit insurance companies.

  • Anonymous

    I, just don’ t understand, it can cost $10,000 month to help and house this person, but we can build a new large prison in Warren, and the cost to house and feed a prisoner is $47.000 a year. The prisoners can get all the medical they need and have warm rooms, hot food and gym hand weight rooms. Now I’m not saying send these people to prison, but there is some thing wrong when we house a an older person and it cost ten grand a month, and we house a crook for47 grand a year. Mow I’m not saying if the prisoner is I’ll, sick or has a medical issue like aids, that the cost. To house him will in tease, but not to 10.000 a month.

    • Anonymous

      Hey it cost 10,ooo a month just to keep her in the nursing home.  Medications, Doctors visits or a trip to the Hospital cost more…

  • Anonymous

    LePage champions a form of fiscal austerity best known as “Throw Granny under the train.”

  • Anonymous

    well 10,000 a month for the old and nada for all the young souls dying from cancer? do you see something wrong? or, am i blind!!????

    • Guest

      ….

  • Anonymous

    This was a good article letting us know more the truth about the money with MaineCare.

  • Anonymous

    I was very upset when I would go see my dad unannounced at a certain veterans home and see that he had fesies undernieth his fingernails and he would rub his eyes with them, nails wouldn’t be cut,hadn’t been washed,they would spray cologne on him to get rid of the stench. Even some of the weekend staff told me that I should report the staff that work during the week, they would neglect the residence all week as far as hygene so that the weekend staff would have to deal with it. If you have somebody that is in a nurseing home or veterans home never and I mean never let them know that you are comming pop in for a surprise visit and see what your loved ones hygene is really like. It took me 3 months for them to cut my dads hair after repetedly haveing the desk staff write it down. There was so much food stuck in his goatee that had been there for days, he had scabs on his skin underneith. I could only make it on weekends to see my dad and I would be the one that would have to clean him up. My dad served 45 years in the military 20 active and 25 as a civilian. He had 2 massive strokes he was bed ridden,couldnt hear,see,or talk, was on liquids. His military insurance tricare would only cover what medicare wouldnt. It cost him his retirement,social security,and then some for his care. What I don’t understand is that it was a veterans home and I was told that if he was in Togus that it was paid 100% buy the military but  where it wasn’t in Togus then it wasn’t.  A Vterans home is a veterans home and whoever is in one wherever it is should be paid for 100% by the military. I went to Tuscon Arizona because my brother was in the veterans home/hospital and it was amazeing, clean ,well staffed beautifull place and excellent staff,paid 100% for his sevice in the military. Wish my dad could have gone to such a nice facility to die instead of the one here in Maine. My dad passed last year & My brother passed Jan 1st 2012. I contacted the administrator of the facility where my dad was at and talked about his care and hygene, got nowhere,as a matter of fact when I would go to visit my dad after talking to the administrator I was treated like an outcast by the head staff incharge of my dads care.
    I was told to contact the senetors of Maine, did that and got nowhere. My dad is now free and doesnt have to suffer not only his disability but his care anymore either.

    • Anonymous

      You should have reported them to DHHS.  Who was the nursing home where your father was and why did you not call and report them?

      • Anonymous

        I did report them, I called senetors,I contacted the administrator, It is a private run VA Home. I was even told by another person who over heard me complaineing about my dads care and poor hygene who litterally chased me down the hall to tell me that he was haveing the same problems with the care of his dad,, but unfortunately he was there cleaning out his dads room, because his dad had passed away,, so sad to think that at the end of your life that your neglected at a very high price. I thought we were doing the right thing and that it would be better care,, but was severely wrong.

  • when obamacare fully kicks in these people will be out of luck. the focus is going to be on cost containment and the ones that cost the system the most will be scrutinized. there will be a cost-benefit analysis and the determination will be this; you won’t be working anymore so you can’t pay taxes so you will be a drain on society therefore you get pain management and no health care. are we entering a Brave New World, Logan’s Run, or Soylent Green?

    • Anonymous

      Your faith-based rehash of this death panel zombie lie is insipid and obtuse.

  • Anonymous

    Not that it would solve all of our health problems, but if we Americans took better care of ourselves a lot of this could be avoided.  Fast food restaurants are everywhere.  They couldn’t be everywhere if the majority were not eating there a majority of the time.  Take some responsibility for your health and the health of your children if you want this trend to change.  This is of course not the only way in which we become healthy, there is a myriad things that the average Joe can do to improve his health so that a lot of these nursing home stays might be avoided.  Alot of these folks could be cared for at home with a support system, but not all families are encouraged to seek this out.  In  ‘some’ cases even family members who could care for ‘some’ loved ones at home, dump them in nursing homes so they don’t have to deal with it.

    • Anonymous

      Oh ya!  Who is going to work while some stays home with this woman who is as helpless as a new born baby?  Who is going to stay up all night to make sure she does not wander off outside?  Yes some people do keep people at home longer than they should, but this woman does need nursing home care!

  • Anonymous

    In Poor Pauls vision of a more perfect state, Lillian is just going to have to go get a job at Chinamart as a greeter. You know, pull her own weight. Oh wait, they are laying off greeters as a cost saving measure. You know, slashing part time minimum wage jobs for the elderly so the 6 Walton heirs can hit the $100 billion mark.

  • the biggest problem with our system is that it is not about health care. it is about insurance. the insurance companies drive up health care costs making simple office visits unaffordable. if the government would concentrate on health care, not insurance we could get ahead. If insurance didn’t have to cover things like checkups and screenings, low cost medicine and other things that insurance was never intended to cover, the price of medical care will naturally go down. I have no problem with the government paying for checkups directly to a doctor for people that cannot truly afford it, but I do have an issue with the government funneling funds through the insurance leg of the banking industry. There is a difference between health care and medical care and they need to be separated and treated differently. The insurance industry does not want this to happen because they will lose money and they intentional blur the lines between the two.

  • Anonymous

    Its pretty bad when you post a comment listing details of care in a local prvate veterans home and how the military insurance Tricare only will cover what medicaid won’t after a man serves his country for 45 years,,, 20 active military,,,25 as a civilian, and the the neglect of hygene care in this facility and the comment does not get posted,, I guess they can chhos the good posts and weed out the truth…

  • Anonymous

    Perhaps if the top 1% of our population paid their fair share, then the 5% like this poor woman wouldn’t have to worry about being thrown to the wolves when LePage makes his cuts.  

  • Anonymous

    I hope these drugged up slackers go out and get a job! I don’t see why an 83 year old woman with advanced dementia isn’t qualified to hold public office. She would certainly have a better understanding of the states problems than the current crowd.

  • Anonymous

    http://www.vacationstogo.com/emailtick.cfm

    It would be cheaper to put this woman on  a cruiseship ($1999 for 35 day cruise) than to leave her in the nursing home.  There’s a doctor on board and the food would be better…

  • Anonymous

    A horrible dilema. Society has changed for the (good?) and no longer cares for their elderly family members at their home anymore, due to various reasons. When family members are too old to care for themselves they are sent to a Nursing Home. This is hopefully a heartwrenching decision by their loved ones. I know many and you may too, that sign their home over to a close relative, in order to save it for their kids, while going on the State. This isn’t right, I believe the law is if you haven’t owned a home within 5 years, the State can’t come back and aquire it to help defer the Mainecare or welfare costs. I don’t know of anyone who the State has aquired their parents home if their parents had passed, and this is a big reason DHHS is in the red. Family members who choose to put loved ones in a Nursing Home, need to no up front it’s not free: and sign the homestead over to defer their loved ones last bills.

  • Anonymous

    Sounds like LePage’s measures would produce the real “Death Panels” (and not those dreamed up by Palin and Bachmann).

  • jimbobhol

    Nursing home Ratings……….. Memberofthefamily.net……..

  • Anonymous

    here’s a link, about not eating, and the right to die http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/040510p42.shtml

  • Anonymous

    I have to ask this again? Top 5 percent of what?? there is no “Top” five anything.

     The headline should read “Five percent account for 50 percent of costs.” 

     What exactly would they be the “Top” of?

     My god, are your editors illiterate?

  • It is just another reason for a single payer health insurance system.  Maine Care should be mandatory coverage for everyone – and have a premium charged on a sliding scale say to a maximum of $1,600 per month for a family and be paid for by the person not the employer (that applies to all government employees as well).  Right now no one pays a premium for the Maine Care coverage.  It could be a basic Wall Mart plan and have co-pays for those who can afford it for each doctor visit ($50) and prescription co-pays, and a mandatory $100 for a trip to the hospital for EVERYONE no matter what the income level to stop the use of emergency services for simple ailments. If you want coverage beyond what Maine Care will cover, then buy it yourself from a private insurer.  There should also be government owned and managed medical centers and nursing home facilities (Not for profit) – where the staff is all on salary – no fee for service, and have the facilities equipped to handle routine care up to full emergency room care and short term hospitalization.  But it should go beyond that for the entire country – insurance should be portable so you can get care in any state.  Medical records should be computerized so where ever you get care the doctor in charge can access your entire medical record in a matter of seconds and not spend money repeating tests that were done a month ago.  WAIT – I just described the VA health care system.  This is what I have – I am a Veteran.

  • I don’t like it when they start putting people in these types of categories.   This is getting scary.  God protect the weak, elderly, sick and poor of this state. 

  • Anonymous

    Don’t patients have privacy rights?? The newspaper doesn’t have to get permission if a patient is not aware of  the use of pictures and stories about them.    To use sick people to win an argument is lowdown. When people throw percentages at you That is another clue to public propaganda. These percentages are not backed up at all. Don’t print anymore pictures of sick people. Diagnosis  is a private matter also.

  • Anonymous

    Don’t patients have privacy rights.?? Lillian is probably not aware that her pictures and diagnosis is published. When sick people are used  to promote your ideas it is lowdown. Percentages like 5%  should be proven also.

  • Old Bear

    Gov Lepage why not make it so if your under maine care you have a $50.00 copay everytime mom thinks she need to run to the ER for a hang nail.That would stop some of the problems. The elderly have taken care of this state for years and years and never ask for a dime. But tables have turned. SO what are we doing taking away from the elderly. 

You may also like