Comments for: Maine state trooper pleads guilty to OUI

Posted Jan. 24, 2012, at 3:54 p.m.

PORTLAND | A Maine state trooper cited for drunken driving by a fellow trooper has pleaded guilty. A judge on Tuesday fined Robin Parker $500 and suspended his driver’s license for 90 days. The Department of Public Safety also suspended him for two months without pay and demoted him …

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  • Having never gotten an O.U.I. is that the average first time offense sentence?

    • Anonymous

      Its typical of just about all first OUI’s……The guy is lucky to even have a job…..90 day license suspension and $500 fine is nothing compared to the 8 weeks w/o pay and the estimated (my estimate)  8k he will probably loose each year through his demotion.  He might get some of that money back though if he does some OUI grant patrols :)

      • Plus when he goes back to work, he will be a paper shuffler for a month. At least I don’t think you would be allowed to drive a cruiser without a license.

        • Anonymous

          He was at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy as the MSP representative. It was made known several weeks ago by the Colonel of the MSP that a decision to retain or fire this trooper had not been made but that even if he was retained he would not be returning to that position.

    • Anonymous

      Yes.

  • Tom

    He should move to Massachusetts and join the State Police/Mafia there.

    • Anonymous

      maine state police are just the same

  • Anonymous

    He did the right thing, accepted responsibility and has paid for it. He has been given his one and only second chance. If this happens again he should be fired and I expect he will be. 

    • Well said.

    • Anonymous

      I find your support and the decision by the Maine State Police disgusting. This man should be fired and never allowed to work in Law Enforcement again. The decision by the Maine State Police to keep him employed has cast a dark shadow over the organization.

      • Well I agree with SalArg 100% because nobody is perfect and we all make mistakes in life. 

        I do not understand how you think this has cast a dark shadow over the MSP because it has not. He made a huge mistake and he is paying for it dearly.

        He accepted responsibility and did not try to bury his head in the sand and while I do not condone drinking and driving I do give him kudos for admitting his wrong.

      • Anonymous

        I support the actions of the MSP 110% amconservatice. He accepted responsibility for his actions.

        He took a demotion which will cost him now and into retirement. He could have fought it but didn’t.

        He is taking a two-month unpaid suspension. He could have fought it but didn’t.

        He lost his license for 90 days. He could have fought it but didn’t.

        He is paying a $500.00 fine. He could have fought it but didn’t.

        He accepted responsibility for his actions, took his lumps like the rest of us (contrary to what many posters were insisting would happen) and then some. Why shouldn’t he be given a second chance? 

        • Anonymous

          Getting caught red-handed with a blood alcohol of .14 and arrested is not exactly taking responsibility.  Pleading guilty, on the advice of a lawyer who has reviewed your case is not taking responsibility. It’s a strategy. I suppose he could have tried to get off one some kind of technicality, that doesn’t change that he got drunk and drove.   He shouldn’t be given a second chance because he’s sworn to up-hold a law that he can’t follow himself – he’s not police material.

          • Anonymous

            And of course you are perfect and never made a mistake in your life. What he did was wrong, yes, no one is denying that.

      • Anonymous

        I thought you “conservatives” believed in redemption and forgiveness, as Jesus did.  Aren’t you a Christian?  Don’t you love Jesus?  What would Jesus think of your comments here?  Whatever happened to “Let he without sin cast the first stone.”  Are you perfect?  Have you ever mad ea  mistake, even a pretty serious one, taken responsibility, paid your dues, and then been forgiven and given another chance?  Or have you led the life of a perfect angel?
        Yes he’s a vetern trooper and made a significant mistake, but he also took full responsibility, is taking his consequences including the public humiliation (which is the toughest of all), and he deserves the chance to now redeem himself and move on.  A person’s entire life and career should not necessarily be judged nor doomed by one particular mistake.  How about your buddy George W. Bush?  He was arrested for OUI in Maine, drank heavy for years, and snorted cocaine.  And he got to be President, obviously with your vote.  Go think about that one for awhile.

        • Anonymous

          I dont think Bush snorted as much as Obuma but I could be wrong.

    • Anonymous

      Like you said he man’d up and plead guilty. How many would plead not guilty and spend the the bucks if they could on a good lawyer to beat the charge.

  • Guest

    ….

  • Guest

    Don’t be surprised to if we all see this man do something very brave in the future. He wants his good name back in a big way.

  • PaulNotBunyan

    I think it would be hard for him to get another cop job if he had gotten fired. He’s lucky they’re letting him come back as a trooper.

    • Anonymous

      Most reputable trucking companies won’t hire anyone with an OUI on their record.

      • Anonymous

        “Most reputable trucking companies won’t hire anyone with an OUI on their record” because they cannot obtain the CDL they are required to have to drive a truck.

        • Anonymous

          I’ll try to go slower here. If you have a CDL and are driving for a company. Then you are caught and convicted of OUI. You will lose your job and will find it extremly difficult to ever find employment again in that field.

          • Anonymous

            Hey patom1 you don’t have to go “slow” for me but you might want to for yourself. Your original post that I responded to was very specific to a person with an OUI on their record seeking employment in the trucking field as a driver. My resonse simply stated they could not obtain the necessary CDL required to drive a truck.

      • Anonymous

        Depends on how long ago the OUI was, I guess. 

  • Anonymous

    Just goes to show nobody is perfect!

    • Anonymous

      As a trooper won’t he be given a vehicle? Won’t he also be driving under the states insurance?

      • You really think they are going to give him a vehicle to drive when his DL is suspended?

        • Anonymous

          I obviously don’t mean while his license is suspended.

  • Guest

    It’s going to be a LONG 8 years…until retirement!

  • Anonymous

    If he were a CDL truck driver he would lose his job. The insurance rates would be rediculously high for the trucking comany.

    • Anonymous

      Well he doesn’t have or need a CDL

      • Anonymous

        No CDL, but broke a law he is paid to enforce. FIRE HIM NOW! No pension, severence or good bye. Don’t let the door hit you in the ………….Sure it’s not his first time, just got caught.

        • Anonymous

          That’s right. He broke a law. He was charged just like everyone else. He plead guilty which many will not do. He accepted his punishment AND his departments punishment. Maybe it was his first time and maybe it wasn’t.

          But let me ask you this, when was the last time you drove even at a buzzed level?

          • Anonymous

            Isn’ t there a mandatory 3 days in jail on a first time o.u.i?  And at a certain B.A.C,  doesn’t it become criminal?  I could look it up,  but was hoping you knew off the top of your head.

        • It seems to me about 20 years ago a state trouper had a “sexual relationship” with a 10 year old girl severed less than 30 days and got to keep his state pension.

          • Harry H Snyder III

            His name was Foss, and he lost his pension.

    • Anonymous

      Some truck drivers keep their jobs anyway and are obviously driving bigger vehicles than Trooper Parker.

      • Anonymous

        Just not driving as fast as a trooper.

  • Anonymous

    This is just another infomercial for the Maine State Police.
    It is an active barometer for how out of touch hacks like Caine
    and Anne Haskell are with the world of a justice system that is criminal.
    Maine will not enter the 21st Century for responding to crime until the voters and
    taxpayers take a leadership role in determining how they want their tax dime spent
    in meeting “their needs” for safety in the community.
    If a volunteer civilian review police board with subpoena powers was in place
    the  questions that would be asked:
    1. Do you really want a former Iraqi vet who is a serial killer dealing with his chronic depression
    working for the Maine State Police  who is getting drunk carrying a Glock .40 caliber?
    2. How do we keep a public record of cops who offend?
    3. Should this man be fired and what liability do you have if you don’t fire him?
    4. What other laws is the person breaking?
    5. What role does Restorative Justice play in his case?

    FBI agent pays fine in shooting into hotel cooler

    Sito Negron
    http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2003/aug/29/fbi-agent-pays-fine-in-shooting-into-hotel-cooler/

    Nov. 15, 2005

    http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2005/Nov-15-Tue-2005/news/4312608.html

    FBI agent Clymer sentenced for drunken driving

    Friday, Aug. 29, 2003

    • Anonymous

      Spend the same amount of effort writing your elected representative as you do posting and you might get some where.

      • Anonymous

        LOL
        if you say so

        • Anonymous

          Yes, I said so. If you wrote half as many letters to people that can actually DO something maybe things would change. But you are expending all your energy in a forum that will result in nothing.

          • Harry H Snyder III

            I write MANY letters to “people that can actually DO something” They just don’t.  Letters to government are a waste of time and stamps.

          • Keep doing it though, I hear the post office is in financial trouble, every stamp helps.

          • Anonymous

            Many, many times I have written to our elected officials.  I’ve always gotten a generic form letter with a rubber stamp signature that had nothing to do with  my concerns.  Except for the times that I received no response at all!

  • Anonymous

    He should be fired.  A demotion is not enough.

    • Anonymous

      Why Bangorian? He accepted responsibility for his actions.

      He took a demotion which will cost him now and into retirement.
      He is taking a two-month unpaid suspension.
      He lost his license for 90 days.
      He is paying a $500.00 ($100.00 more then the minimum under the OUI law) fine.
      His personal auto insurance rates will increase.
      He is barred from entering Canada.
      Lost his position at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy.

      Just to name a few ramifications to his bad judgement.

      • Anonymous

        He didn’t have any choice.  This drunk could have killed somebody and if he doesn’t know better, I’m not sure who would.  He needs to find a new career.

        • Anonymous

          He most certainly did have a “choice”.

          He could have fought the case. He could have fought the two month suspension. He could have fought the demotion.

          He didn’t. He accepted responsibility and the punishment and in my book that earns a second chance.

        • Anonymous

          BS!
          And I am  sick of the likes of you and others like you with your self righteous, holier than thou garbage.
          You would not make a pimple on that man’s butt.

          • Anonymous

            Reggie, Thank you for saying it!  Bangorian is only one of about a dozen who repeatedly state senseless opinions over and over.  I’m sure that all of them combined probably do not have the integrity that the trooper in question has in one little toe.  And I’m sure he would not have the nads to stand in front of that trooper and repeat the comments he has posted on this site. 

          • Anonymous

            libsux: you hit the nail on the head, “Bangorian” is full of useless DAILY opinions that he/she  only has the to nerve to express/type hidden behind the comments section of the BDN.

          • Anonymous

            Disqus generic email templateThanks for the support on this. This officer stood up and admitted it and accepted his punishment like an adult. If we fired every law enforcement officer who broke the laws they were sworn to uphold on their first offense, 90% would be out the door in the first year of employment and there wouldn’t be any new hires to fill the vacancies. They are people too and should be allowed a few discretions like the rest of us. Bangorian would be an even bigger whiner if he or any of his family were to receive the treatment he would like bestowed on this cop.

      • Roy Blenkhorn

        you left out the fact he will have to complete DEEP .. oh yah. good times.. I wonder if he will be able to get a work-restricted licence for work related purposes :D

      • Anonymous

        right on

      • Anonymous

        Minor technical point. Minimum fine is $500 now.
        I agree otherwise.  

      • Anonymous

        he can enter canada pay 200 $ rehabilitation fee or wait 10 years

        • Anonymous

          Not according to various websites and people that I know with OUI convictions on their records. They have been turned back at the border.

          Unfortunately, getting into Canada might not be so easy. According to http://tinyurl.com/23jwzmd, an association for Minnesota and Wisconsin lawyers (as well as many other websites), the Canadian government does not allow those with OUI convictions into the country:

          “Many countries classify certain crimes as a reason to refuse (or limit) entry into their country. The Canadian government has determined certain individuals are not allowed to enter Canada or to remain inside the Canadian borders if they have committed certain crimes including a DWI or DUI offense. Other crimes that may limit admission to Canada include, without limitation: embezzlement, shoplifting, theft, assault or battery, firearm charges, drug charges.

          “Any felony conviction will also result in a denial of admission to Canada.
          “Minister’s Approval Necessary for Entry: The only way to seek admission into Canada after a DWI or other qualifying offense is to apply for a Minister’s Approval of Rehabilitation. For a DWI, this process can be initiated only five years after the probationary period for an offense such as a DWI has elapsed.”

          If your conviction was 10 years ago, applying for permission seems promising.”

          • Anonymous

            First of all you can go i n if they dont check you out, second the border people have discretion – i have seen them tell people they dont have to let them in because of oui but then they do, third you can apply for a ministers permit  and pay the 200 fee if they concur  with the 5 years. Ive seen it, did it so I know

          • Anonymous

            jd, not that I condone the officers OUI; but I believe this was too harsh…remember that even I don;t like LEO’s.

            If this is his first offence, by the way, if not, so be it.
            Just saying that he is human and was judged way too harshly! JMHO..

          • Anonymous

            It funny actually, being on opposite sides on this topic.

            My personal feeling is the punishment fits the crime and sets an example that incidents like this will not be tolerated by the MSP. In a way, he is very lucky. He could have been dismissed and I am sure it was considered but he took responsibility for his actions and he plead guilty.

  • Anonymous

    How many people do you think is going to trust him once he gets back into his car? If it were a bus driver they would have lost their job because they are part of public safety..well isnt this “Trooper” as well? He might have accepted the responsibilty for it in court but only because he got caught…what else was he going to do?

    • Anonymous

      The “bus driver” will lose his job because he is required to have and maintain a CDL, not because they are “part of public safety” which they are not.

  • Anonymous

    does he go to  jail and drunk school too.. cause he is no stranger to booze with a .14 level.. should we be subject to this happening again.. possible a cruiser could get wrecked and someone hurt or killed.. they should be held to higher standards. they certainly act like they are better then most

    • Anonymous

      really. By the looks of it, it looks like he believes he is no better then anyone else and plead guilty to move on and excepted responsibility for it. All the good he has done should not be forgotten. Ever think the job caused him to start drinking to forget the things he has seen and deal with. We should be helping him not forgetting him The US did that in 1960’s 

    • Anonymous

      1st time offenders with no aggravating factors are not sentenced to jail time and DEEP will cost him another $300.00

    • He got what every other first timers gets, so in a sense that is fair. On the other hand, if they are held in a higher regard when enforcing the law, i.e. assaulting an officer is worse than just assault, then there is a compelling argument that they should be held in higher regards when they break the law. But then again, he wasn’t acting as a state trooper when he was caught, so he is just a normal Joe… IDK it’s all kind of confusing. He committed a crime, was tried, plead guilty, and is serving his sentence that is no worse or any better than an average Joe’s (loss of respect, etc aside).

  • Anonymous

    BUT BUT BUT, what about the BLUE WALL?  People were SO sure he’d get away with it.  Show’s how little they know about reality.  Stop running your mouths about things you know nothing about.

    • Anonymous

      He took responsibility unlike alot of posters on here. Best of luck Trooper and hope you get the much needed help for you alcohol use. 

      • Anonymous

        Agreed.  He acknowledged his mistake and took responsibility.  That’s more than 75% of the people who go through the system. 
        I hope he learned from his mistake.  Judging from his actions thus far, I’d say he’s well on his way.

  • Anonymous

    I guess that by this action even the state police figure the oui law has gone to far and it may be time to roll it back.

  • He should have lost his job for this. 

  • Anonymous

    Okay to all of the posters that say”Well he admitted he was wrong, he took his punishment, we all make mistakes, etc, etc” If while driving drunk, he hit and killed your husband, wife, child, brother, sister or other family member, would you be here posting,”well, he took his lumps, good for him.” ?

    • Many sober but distracted drivers are guilty of killing husbands, wives, children etc. I think you all would be extremely surprised if data was ever published that compared the number of drivers in fatal accidents with a BAC higher then .08 to those who were not paying attention, texting, fell asleep etc.  However we can thank M.A.D.D. and other power hungry self interest groups for casting anyone who has ever stepped into a vehicle after drinking as a villian.

      Think about it… is it not just as dangerous to talk on a cell phone or text while driving? What about getting behind the wheel when one is tired? Yet I doubt you’ll see anyone lose their license for 90 days on the first offense for doing one of the above or three years for the second offense.

      Drinking and driving is bad. No one is arguing that. What bothers me is the rate at which these fatal “accidents” are occuring in Maine yet no one is taking accountability. I say “accidents” because truly there is no such thing as an “accident” while driving. If road and weather conditions and other factors are taken into account by every driver each and every day we would have no “accidents”.

  • So he gets the minimun charge even though he was .14 that is very close to .15 witch would be 2 days in jail minimum. Im thinking when he was driving he was over .15 it takes awhile to get them to the test.  Can I prove it No is it more likely than not yes. and he gets the minimum not like he was a .08 or .09

  • Anonymous

    Not sure if most of you know this but 0.14 and over is concidered aggrivated OUI whit the penalties are much stiffer for the normal citizen. He got off with a slap on the wrist and anybody that has had an OUI knows this is a fact that there is jail time involved wether it it is a first time offence or not,, it was aggrivated OUI  0.14    At that blood alcohol level that is not buzzed, that is trashed. Another that got off with a slap on the wrist.

    • Anonymous

      You are incorrect. You MUST be  .15 BAC in order to be sent for a 48 hrs mandatory sentence in jail

      • Anonymous

        Maybe it is differant in Washington County, but I have had 3 OUI’s and think I know what I am talking about. Not that I am proud of it and haven’t had a drink since, but I was 0.14  and they charged me as aggrivated OUI they said because of the alcohol level of 0.14 and higher is aggrivated.

      • Guest

        Of course we can all rest assured that there wasn’t even the thought of evidence tampering here.

        Coverup and corruption – Pick a badge number.

    • Anonymous

      the accruacy of the meter is +/- .o2  all measuring equipment have a tolerance, precision and accuracy

       no breathilizer reading is ever exact it will always be +/- 0.1-0.2  so at 0.14  there is reasonable doubt that the reading was  0.14 more accurately it was between 0.12 and 0.16

      • Anonymous

        It was a blood reading not a breathalizer it came out as 0.14 and I was charged with an aggrivated DUI. They specifically told me that 0.14 or higher is considered an aggravated DUI so why would they lie and charge me, no speeding,no evadeing, the excuse for pulling me over was because they saw me leaveing a bar after midnight. They were sitting across from the bar in a parking lot. Nothing else involved except pulled over,, sobriety test,taken to hospital for a blood draw and charged with 0.14 aggrivated DUI year loss of license, 7 days in jail, $800.00 fine. None the less,,,A Trooper who commits the same crime as any other citizen should get the same penalties. I will commend him for standing up for his mistake,and also the officers for not brushing it under the carpet and letting him off. He has been demoted and loses his license, but will be back on the streets and eventually picking up somebody for the same crime he commited,,Just seems wrong…I do believe that people deserve a second chance,, but when your in law enforcement, you have a obligation to set an example and if you can’t you should not be in that profession.

  • Anonymous

    Sounds fair…..Atleast he didn’t get off….

  • Anonymous

    So how’s he gonna drive a cruiser for three months without a license? Will he spend 3 months going from school to school telling kids what he lost as a result of the OUI? That would be a nice result. He at least pled guilty…a not guilty plea would have painted him as a perma-slimeball in my book.

  • Harry H Snyder III

    I’m sort of in the middle here.  I believe he should have been suspended until he regains his driver’s license.  Taxpayers (His employer) are not getting full valued until he has all his job-related ability.  I also believe that he should be mandated to undergo counseling before returning to work.

  • Anonymous

    I am sure that at least 75% of you that have posted comments have driven while alittle under the influnce, The guy admitted and took his punishment, its bad enough he drove( which we all have) while not thinking we were impaired, demoted to trooper is a big pay decrease and just facing other officers who respect all that you have done and know you as a freind. But you that have been caught that in fact wasn’t in law enforcement for the same crime. what if your boss found out and fired you or came up and said that your pay was going to be cut by a 1/3 . My opinion the guy took his punishment, admitted his fault and got a fair sentence the same as any other 1st time OUI. his life should go on and and put this behind him. Good luck to him in the future

    • Anonymous

      Agree with you 100%.

    • Anonymous

      Try to remember your words the next time you catch someone with a gram of weed.  ( I mean someone not in law enforcement. )

    • Paka

      I Am so happy he got stopped, Drinking and driving is a big deal to me , I have never ever Drank in m life I am 55 yrs. I drive when ever we go out , I am the DD and you would not believe how many people I see on the road drunk at 1 , 2am. I don’t feel his punishment is fair one bit. Facing coworkers ha , Family, Friends So what he didn’t care about any of them when he drove. Congrats to the officer who caught him Thank you 

    • Anonymous

      Your sure that at least 75%  & ( which we all have ) – mighty righteous  unsupportable assumptions there

      Try “Im sure a number of you posting comments”  or which many have

      A problem with some of the Police officers i have encountered even in friendly situations is they believe they are above the law and express themselves to the people as if they are superior  and unquestionable.  There are way too many examples of law enforcement and District attorneys being flushed out as child molesters, drunks , wife beaters – need to dig into this

  • Anonymous

    He should be held at a higher standard than the people on the street. I am sure he has heard from more than one training video that drunk driving is a crime.

  • How many other people in this state would lose that much money over the period of a lifetime for an OUI? None! Cops ARE apparently “above” the law and pay DEARLY when they screw up. It’s B/S!

    • Anonymous

      My company couldn’t afford to loose me for 8 weeks,  i’d be replaced.  And i’m just a simple carpenter.  So I would loose a lot.  Sure,  after 90 days I might be able to find another job,  again, MIGHT,  but would be starting at the bottom of the pole,  making much less.

  • Anonymous

    Of course he should be fired. Respect for police is at an all time low. He is paid to uphold a law, but cant follow it himself.

    So many of you are saying “he took responsibility”. No he didnt. If he had, he would have not been in the car in the first place, or, he would have turned himself in. If he had not been caught, do you think he would have “accepted responsibility”?

    Its not just the drunk driving, its the hypocrisy. Make an example of ANY officer who cant respect the laws he is paid to uphold.

  • Anonymous

    Give him a bicycle. 

  • Anonymous

    Being a police officer, he should be held to a higher standard. He should lose his job and benefits for not living up to the expectations from the people he serves. It is to bad  that the penalties do not fit his actions.

  • and to think one of our Hancock County Sheriff Deputy’s was speeding for no reason whatsoever, demolished a crusier,  and was only suspended for a day.  This deputy should have gone before a judge for driving to endanger, aggrivated criminal speeding, and other charges.  Just got a slap in the wrist.

  • Anonymous

    He made a mistake, I can see from the comments here that many people think they’re perfect and never made a mistake. Re-instate his position but let him pay the fine. Everyone makes mistakes, he is no exception. I think taking away his drivers license for 90 days was a little much too. It’s not like he’s an alcoholic and constantly drives drunk like a lot of people. After all his years of service and stress, don’t let one mistake ruin his life. He protected many citizens, we need guys like him.

  • Anonymous

    Everyone makes mistakes and I hate to see anyone go through this but if he learns from it and accepts his punishment without malice he should be OK.  He can only blame himself and I hope he is able to recover!  It may make him a better, more understanding police officer.  Good luck to him!

  • Guest

    ….

  • Anonymous

    If i did this i’d go to jail!!Why not him.

  • Anonymous

    He should be fired now. Everyone knows the law!!

  • Anonymous

    I think all of you posting to
    this article would be mortified if you knew the hypocrisy of the State Police
    and how they do business.  Are any of you
    even remotely aware that if you want to become a Trooper in the State of Maine
    you cannot do so if you have an OUI conviction within the last 6 years of your
    application date.  They won’t even take
    your application!  It is called an “automatic
    disqualifier”.  This is taken right from
    the State Trooper application posted on-line.

     

    “You should be aware before
    starting the application process that you will automatically be
    eliminated for any of the following:

     

    AUTOMATIC
    DISQUALIFIERS

     

    6. Have been convicted
    of operating under the influence (O.U.I.) of intoxicating liquor and/or drugs
    within the six (6) years preceding the date of your application;

    7. Have been
    adjudicated as having committed a two-hundredths (0.02) violation within the
    six (6) years preceding the date of your application;

    8. Are currently
    abusing drugs or alcohol;”

     

    How is it that someone who is a
    Trooper can plead guilty to an OUI but someone who is applying can’t even have
    one conviction for OUI within 6 years or better yet, have a non-criminal .02
    violation within 6 years?  Where is the
    outrage and better yet why isn’t the reporter mentioning this instead of
    writing what is essentially a propaganda piece about Parker and what a standup
    guy he is?  Do any of you know that at
    the MCJA they teach cadets that when they arrest someone for OUI that same
    person has driven drunk 87 times before actually getting caught? This is the
    same MCJA where Parker served as a Supervisor for goodness sakes!!!!  Do any of you really believe that this was the
    first time Parker drove drunk in 2011 or in any preceding year?  No wonder the leaders in our state are corrupt.
    The general public in Maine is too fat, dumb, and happy to do anything about it
    or just doesn’t care.  Truth is told, our
    failure to do anything about such hypocrisy’s and corruption takes away our
    right to complain about it.  Evil
    continues to triumph because of the unwillingness of good people to do nothing
    about it…….disgusting!

  • Anonymous

    I think by law he gets one chance before being fired if he claimed he had a problem, although isnt 0.14 criminal?

    • Anonymous

      Skull you bring up a good point and one in which there is
      much confusion in America and the State of Maine. If Parker claimed he was an alcoholic
      he could seek protection under the American’s With Disabilities Act, (ADA)
      however that doesn’t mean he gets to keep his job. Please Google “does ADA
      protect an alcoholic from termination” and you will get all the
      information you desire. Suffice to say many police officers across the country
      have been successfully terminated for having been convicted of OUI. As a matter
      of fact, former Maine Trooper Tammy Doyle was charged with OUI in 2003 and put
      on administrative leave without pay the next day. She was then fired by the
      State Police before her case even went to trial. Interesting to see the
      disparity of treatment of which no reporter is discussing in the Parker
      case.  Also of note is that Col. Williams
      was a Major in the State Police at that time and fully supported the
      termination of Trooper Doyle.  Trooper
      Doyle had a great record and was well respected, not sure why she was treated
      in such a dissimilar fashion. And remember, Parker was never put on
      administrative leave without pay.  Could
      it be a case of Col. Williams having issues with women in uniform?  One would have to ask those questions if they
      really cared about ensuring fairness.

      • Anonymous

        Maybe the following will fill in the gaps and explain with Trooper Doyle was terminated rather than given a second chance.

        The Tammy Doyle case was a lot more than an OUI stop and arrest.

        She was operating her state-owned pick-up truck when stopped for backing out of a driveway without looking, almost causing an accident.

        She refused a field sobriety test and any other chemical tests.

        She was a K-9 handler and called her dog out of her pick-up and the Dexter officer called for back-up.

        Doyle was arrested for driving under the influence, resisting arrest and failure to sign a traffic ticket.

        http://www.sunjournal.com/node/254366

        She plead not guilty at her initial court appearance and her attorney filed motions to suppress evidence gathered by officers at the scene, statements made by Doyle that
        night, and to exclude her refusal to take the breath test. (The motions to suppress were denied)

        http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-11751556.html

        Doyle’s BAC was 0.28

        http://www.dextermaine.org/news/011004bdn.html

        Doyle’s case is an example of what Parker could have done but didn’t.

        • Anonymous

          So I guess in your mind if a Trooper, who is a citizen, exercises their constitutional rights that should be held against them? Did you not see that Parker’s attorney also commented that he explored defense possibilities but in the end he and Parker agreed to plead guilty?
          So, with your mindset, if a Trooper is charged with negotiating a worthless instrument (bad check) and he pleads guilty on arraignment day he should be disciplined but keep his job because he didn’t contest the charge and he told the Colonel of the State Police and other Troopers he was sorry????
          Bottom line, Trooper Doyle was treated differently, the fact she was placed on administrative leave without pay the next day is indicative of that. Parker wasn’t just “caught” for OUI; he was driving erratically enough for a citizen to have called 911 to report it in attempts to avoid a serious accident.
          Jd, do you know just how drunk you have to be for someone to pick up their cellular to call 911?  Do you remember Gary Sledzic and the exit 6A disaster??? Do some research on that while you have some free time.
          http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1914&dat=19970325&id=mtIgAAAAIBAJ&sjid=22oFAAAAIBAJ&pg=3907,3470404
          You have to be a law enforcement official or have one in your family. That would be the only reason you could even rationalize failure to sign a ticket and resisting arrest as being as dangerous to the public as operating a vehicle erratically while under the influence. Think about it jd, a person actually reported   Parker while he was driving erratically, reminds me of the TV show “seconds from disaster”.

          • Anonymous

            isenoughenough seems that you are a bit testy today.

            Parker’s BAC .014 = 0.13-0.15 BAC: Gross motor impairment and lack of physical control. Blurred vision and major loss of balance. Euphoria is reduced and dysphoria (anxiety, restlessness) is beginning to appear. Judgment and perception are severely impaired.

            Doyle’s BAC 0.28 = 0.25 BAC: All mental, physical and sensory functions are severely impaired. Increased risk of asphyxiation from choking on vomit and of seriously injuring yourself by falls or other accidents. 0.30 BAC: STUPOR. You have little comprehension of where you are. You may pass out suddenly and be difficult to awaken.
            ~~~~~
            Parker submitted to arrest. He submitted to having his BAC measured. He wasn’t driving his department issued cruiser. He didn’t threaten and poke the arresting officer in the chest.

            Doyle resisted arrest. She refused to perform field sobriety tests. She was driving her department issued pick-up truck WITH her K-9 partner. She threatened the arresting officer. She poked the arresting officer in the chest.
            ~~~~
            Parker plead guilty.

            Doyle plead not guilty (which is her right)
            ~~~~~
            Parker 1st time OUI offense with no aggravating factors

            Doyle 1st time OUI offense with aggravating factors (aggravating offense = BAC of .15 percent or more)
            ~~~~~
            Parker = Suspension 90 days, Jail Time None, Fine $500.00

            Doyle = Suspension 90 days, Jail Time 48 hours, Fine $600.00

            Happy Reading http://www.lexisone.com/lx1/caselaw/freecaselaw?action=OCLGetCaseDetail&format=FULL&sourceID=hgjh&searchTerm=eDNH.KUIa.aadj.edIL&searchFlag=y&l1loc=FCLOW
            ~~~~~
            “You have to be a law enforcement official or have one in your family.”

            Not that it should matter one iota, but I was a Police Officer many, many years ago before I switched to one of the other sides of public safety.
            ~~~~~
            “That would be the only reason you could even rationalize failure to sign a ticket and resisting arrest as being as dangerous to the public as operating a vehicle erratically while under the influence.”

            Let me thank you for placing words in my mouth. I never said or implied that “failure to sign a ticket and resisting arrest as being as dangerous to the public as operating a vehicle erratically while under the influence” NEVER. I said there was more to the case then a “more than an OUI stop and arrest”. And that is a fact.
            ~~~~~
            “Think about it jd, a person actually reported   Parker while he was driving
            erratically, reminds me of the TV show “seconds from disaster”.”

            And a Dexter police office witnessed Doyle pull into a driveway and back out onto Route 7 causing another vehicle to swerve around her to avoid an accident.
            ~~~~~
            What you want to believe is the cases are equal and that either Doyle was punished inappropriately or Parker was not punished enough. You can believe that all you want as that is your right. And while that is your right it doesn’t mean you ARE right.

          • Anonymous

            Jd,
            for the record I believe that Parker was treated fair and I do not think he
            should be fired. You are right, my point is the unfairness exhibited by the
            Maine State Police in disciplining its members. Over the past 30 years there
            have been Trooper’s dismissed for honest mistakes they made for which they were
            sorry and accepted responsibility for. The majority of those Troopers did not commit
            a criminal act but yet they were fired. I wish I could provide the names of
            those former Troopers but I will not to protect their privacy. Trust me JD, if
            you could get the legislature or the governor to impanel a commission to
            examine this disparate treatment you and the citizens of this state would be
            mortified. For example, I know of one Trooper who was fired for simply walking
            out of an Internal Affairs interview because he was being berated by the Lt.
            conducting the interview. He was under IA for missing a court date for a
            traffic offense, he wrote down the wrong date in his calendar. The Internal
            Affairs Lt. continued to berate him about how he could make the error and
            according to the Trooper he felt threatened by the Lt. He was fired within a
            few months but then rehired after the Attorneys representing the State Police
            realized the wrongness of State Police management and worked out an agreement
            for him to return to work. He suffered greatly over a year and was under tremendous
            stress which he still is recovering from. This is just one case of many that
            would shock your conscience. Fired for walking out on an interview that most educated
            people determined was unprofessional and bordering on harassment but the
            department only suspends a Trooper for OUI, a criminal offense.  Jd, please tell me that regardless of the
            other issues we have bantered back and forth that you see the unfairness of it
            all?  You may disagree on the Doyle comparison
            but how about this comparison????  If the
            State Police can’t treat all members fairly how can we as citizens expect them
            to treat citizens fairly?????

  • Anonymous

    I’m not sure, but wouldn’t it become a legal problem if the trooper was testifying in court about an OUI arrest he made? I thought that things like this become a BIG problem in court in the future…??? It’s something I heard regarding another situation.

  • Anonymous

    How can this man ever be taken seriously as an officer again.  Any lawyer worth his salt will surely be able to beat any oui cases this man brings to court in the future.

  • Anonymous

    Are We Forgetting He is Human!! Relax People!!

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