December 16, 2017
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Comments for: What can Maine learn from Kestrel’s migration?

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  • Anonymous

    What can Maine learn from Kestrel’s migration?

    That corporate socialism is not good business ? 

    • Anonymous

      i know, that makes me so grrrrrrr…mad!

  • Anonymous

    Before we go jumping at copying other states, let’s look at how those states are doing in keeping and creating jobs compared to us.

    Three states were given as examples:

    Wisconsin with an unemployment rate of 7.3%.  Worse than Maine’s.

    Arizona with an unemployment rate of 8.7%.  Much worse than Maine’s

    Texas with an unemployment rate of 8.1%.  Much worse than Maine’s.

    Maine’s unemployment rate is 7.0% and getting better.

    http://www.bls.gov/web/laus/laumstrk.htm

    Perhaps these states should be copying Maine, instead of us copying them???

    • Obama doing a great job bringing jobs to Maine.  LePage–not so much

      • Anonymous

        What objective methodology and metrics are you using to ascribe credit to one policy maker versus the other? I would like to see the data to support your comment and the specific policies identified to which you attribute the results.

    • Guest

      ATLANTA,GA UNEMPLOYMENT IS 12.6%

    • Anonymous

      The only reason Maine is getting better by the nembers is because people are dropping off the unemployment rolls. Not by finding jobs. DUH!

  • Anonymous

    Maine will never learn anything. The state is extremely backward, with an uneducated Governor LePage who crawled out of the Dark Ages. With mostly old people, Hippies and Redneck” not in my backyard crowd.” The educated young Mainers have long left the state for Careers in  high tech and large corporate white collar positions which Maine does not have and will never have.  Most Maine industry left, is obsolete.  The few railroads left are in collapse. Maine’s infrastructure is in collapse. Maine has very, very expensive  energy, whether heating oil, gasoline, natural gas and electricity mostly imported from Canada. Maine has nothing to learn here, but to accept, it has become a low wage, uneducated, welfare state, loaded with Drugs and Junkies. It is a Third World Country, maybe even worse.

    • Anonymous

      I agree with much of what you said but LePage did NOT create this mess, he inherited it from the liberal Dems that governed before him.

      • Too simple. You are an example of knightcross,s commentary. Take NAFTA into consideration and get out of  your small minded Maine/Ignorant thought process. Do you live on an island.

        • Anonymous

          don’t blame NAFTA.  the economy was going  global with our without NAFTA.

          more appropriately, we should blame our reaction to NAFTA; our failure to reeducate, our failure to adapt.

          it’s incorrect to think that jobs all went over seas.  the fact is, automation is/was going to gobble those rote positions anyway.

          • Anonymous

            NAFTA is not the problem. We could live with a trade agreement with Mexico and Canada. The WTO is the problem. We won WWII by out producing our enemies. We couldn’t out produce Haiti these days thanks to the treasonous dirt bags who packed up their factories and fled to China with all the jobs. We are currently running a trade DEFICIT with 88 nations around the world to the tune of $550 billion this year, $350 billion of it with China alone. Our “public servants” have managed to get us upside down in just about every trade agreement they have “negotiated” on our behalf. They wouldn’t be allowed to sweep the floors in the private sector with a job performance like that. The Republicans and the Democrats are at fault and we should not be foolish enough to keep sending these two parties back to Washington and expect a different result, that is the definition of insanity.

          • Anonymous

            i agree with everything you said.  but i honestly blame the consumers (me and you).

            buy local whenever possible. 

          • Anonymous

            I spend 95% of my disposable income within a 5 mile radius of my home and with locally owned businesses only. You are absolutely right. A lack of patriotism at the cash register is a lot of our problem. The treasonous dirt bags that moved their factories to China for fun and profit could not have done it without our help.

          • Anonymous

            The low and middle class do try to purchase locally. What about the rich, they bank out of the country, invest out of the country and purchase there needs out of the country. Really shows who cares, doesn’t it?

          • Anonymous

            Yes, wealthy people have a tendency to be self absorbed. They would not care about the survival of small local businesses. Some people of wealth would. But most would not. I have an Aunt who is worth about $20 million. She ALWAYS checks ChinaMart first. She can’t help herself! Lol.

            ——————————

      • Anonymous

        Can the liberal vs conservative BS. If you were in a life boat and needed to get away from a sinking ship fast what good would it do if the people on the left side were rowing in one direction and the people on the right were rowing in an opposite direction. The attitude about pointing fingers at one another has done nothing except to get us rowing in a very tight circle. The ONLY way that WE, not politicians, will solve any of our problems is by working together. We have complex problems and simplistic solutions will not solve them . Here is an idea about attracting business to our State. How about the man currently residing in the Blaine House starts telling the world about positive things about our State and her people rather then constantly putting down Maine and her citizens. 

        • Anonymous

          Well said 4mermainer.  The trouble is that we have been brainwashed into thinking in political extremes.  “You’re for us or against us”  This works well for the politicians as it allows them to run the country for the benefit of themselves and their buddies who fund the campaigns.  It does no good at all for most Americans.  In fact, it is obviously harmful to Americans as our current economic malaise proves.

  • Anonymous

    What can we learn?  That Maine isn’t rich enough to win a bidding war.

    • what we learned is LePage is not committed to bringing jobs to Maine.  His only commitment is acting on the MHPC agenda

  • Anonymous

    That there is a cost, in terms of business climate, for hosting a pristine environment, which I appreciate nearly as much as anyone else, is hard to dispute. It seems to be a “deal with the devil” – have pristine environment with a minimal business sector and starve, or relax the environmental restrictions and grow an economy which might generate enough taxes to fund a Kestrel effort. I’m not real big on taxpayer funded Kestrel-type deals, but I guess that’s a game that sometimes has to be played.

    • C’Mon man–this had nothing to do with a “pristine environment”.  this loss was caused by Lepage spending all of his time working for MHPC and not for bringing jobs to Maine.

    • Anonymous

      there were no environmental concerns re: Kestrel.  if there were, please list them.

      • Anonymous

        I can’t list any specifically in regards to Kestrell. What I was referring to was  a bigger picture. For example, the pulp & paper industry. I believe they left because of the political/environmental uncertainty in continuing to invest in their mills. That is what created the “business climate” problems many refer to. That perception has spread to other industries, also. You sound like someone who might say “good riddance” to the paper industry, and industry in general, but that’s my explanation. That is the business climate, and it effects almost all businesses and industry in Maine.

        • Anonymous

          i understand your point.  i am not saying good riddance.  but i do believe in adaptability.  change is inevitable.  

          i don’t believe we have to sacrifice the air we breathe for jobs.  i have a small business.  i don’t dump chemicals.  i pick up after myself.  i don’t get ‘incentives’ from the State.  

          what I did was develop a business plan and then sacrifice.  why do bigger businesses get to litter and pollute when you and i can’t?  

  • Anonymous

    I appreciate your analysis. Have you ever considered being a suicide advocate?!

  • C’Mon man. This had nothing to do with “pristine environments” and everything to do with LePage sucking up to MHPC and not bringing jobs to Maine

  • I think Maine should start an Open For Buisness Sign manufaturing buisness,
     
    It seems that they are so popular that people have been stealing them!

  • Anonymous

    I don’t think we should give away the farm in the name of jobs.  It’s corporate welfare plain and simple.  Why can’t we take that same money and make it available to existing small business owners in Maine allowing them to scale, creating jobs and profits here in Maine.

    And by small business…I don’t mean a company with 600 jobs.   Real small business, those with a handful of employees.  

    • Anonymous

      Maine did the right thing by loosing the deal. Kestrel did not provide its financial information to determine if it was a financially viable concern. For all intents and purposes, the company’s recent financial woes indicate that it was using the game of playing one state off the other to get the best deal in order to try to sell it to potential investors. The company was not being forthcoming with information and that is the classic scheme of a swindle. 

    • Anonymous

      SingleTrackGirl – Do you suppose it might be because the small business people cannot offer payback under the table. If you can somehow make a buck from the big boys, wouldn’t you also go where the big bucks are?

  • Anonymous

    I wonder how much money was in the briefcase.

  • That they the elected officials only focus on paper,potatoes,timber and running maine  as if it were mardens.

  • Anonymous

    I challenge anyone? If you wanted to open a multi-million dollar business, would you consider doing so in Maine? My god, look at what we have running the state. No wonder anyone with common sense gets the heck out of Dodge.

  • Anonymous

    Maine, OPEN FOR BUSINESS,  Ya right. the sign is on the wrong side of the interstate.

  • Anonymous

    Business will never move here with the taxes and regulations!!!!! !!!!!!!!

  • Anonymous

    “First and foremost, the odds are better for us to build what we have, grow what we have, than try to attract what we don’t’ have.” 

    Well said, Mike.  Let’s support our existing businesses (like C&L Aviation) who have proven themselves with a successful record of jobs creation, before we offer the world to a risky start-up venture.

    Lepage’s request to see Kestrel’s finances was certainly reasonable; it is one which any smart businesman should make before committing any funds.  He is simply being prudent with our State’s limited resources.

  • Anonymous

    Companies love playing states against each other because the know they will act like high school boys slobbering over the prom queen.

    And they also love government investment because they usually don’t have to give up any ownership of the company in exchange for the investment by taxpayers. And furthermore that they are dealing with economic development people who have no expertise in their industry and are therefore an easy sell because they are only interested in the next photo-op for the closing handshake of the deal.

    A particular red flag was that Kestrel would not provide financial details. Perhaps the lesson to be learned is that if an idea is really good, professionals such as venture capital will be invested instead of using taxpayers money.

    If history repeats itself, Maine, not Wisconsin was the winner. The prior company for Kestrel founder Alan Klapmeier, was Cirrus Aircraft (he was a cofounder with his brother).  In the Wikipedia entry for Cirrus Aircraft is the following:
     
    “In March 2010 Cirrus went to court in an attempt to get an order to prevent former supplier L-3 Communications from telling other Cirrus suppliers that Cirrus was heading into bankruptcy and from discouraging companies from doing business with Cirrus. On 1 April 2010 Cirrus applied for a “voluntary dismissal” of the case against L3, before L3 had filed a response. L3 has been engaged in a lawsuit against Cirrus for non-payment of US$18.7M in development costs for flat panel electronics, with Cirrus countering that L3 did not abide by the contract terms.
     
    In June 2010 the company began paying back-rent owed to the city of Grand Forks. Cirrus had stopped paying its rent 16 months earlier. It also owed the City of Duluth back rent, which the city has indicated they would forgive in exchange for job creation.
     
    In February 2011, Cirrus was sold for US$210M to China Aviation Industry General  (CAIGA), a subsidiary of Aviation Industry Corporation, which is wholly owned by the Government of the People’s Republic of China.”

    • Anonymous

      I’m not surprised that Kestrel is so secretive and acts as if they have something to hide. I think that privately they know that the future of their company isn’t so assured as they’d have others believe.

      The small airplane manufacturing business is an extremely difficult one.  Even in the best of years, the existing manufacturers have had difficulties.

      I see nothing so special about Kestrel’s proposed products that was going to give them an upper hand in the market.

      As world oil production continues to stagnate and as the likes of Chindia demand more of their fair share, oil will continue to get ever more pricey.  Jet fuel and avgas are destined to get so expensive that the aviation industry is destined to shrink despite the plans of Virgin Atlantic, Boeing, and so on, to run the world’s plane fleet on tropical oils such as jathropha. 

      People laugh at the idea that Maine is stubbornly hanging onto timber, potatoes, and so on, as economic drivers, but I think it’s dangerous to assume that we’re all going to sail into the future, energy-starved for fossil fuels as it’s going to be, all being paid big bucks to code in Perl, from our computer workstations at home, then hopping into our private, Kestrel aircraft, to go snowboarding in the Rockies.

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