November 24, 2017
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Comments for: Maine Warden Service swears in four new game wardens

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  • Anonymous

    So what the heck did they do for eighteen weeks at the first academy? what a waste of money

    • Anonymous

      Basic law enforcement that all police officers learn. The next 12 weeks will be specialized training, so they can enforce wildlife laws, learn wilderness survival, and learn how to find people, and you’re probably one of them, who don’t have sense enough to take a compass into the woods with them. You probably won’t consider it a “waste of money” if you or a loved one gets lost someday and needs them to rescue you. I can’t imagine 30 weeks of intense training. I think it shows considerable drive and commitment. Wonder how long the training process for your job was.

      • Didn’t a Warden get in trouble for peeing on another Warden while on a stake out? Also don’t they cover up for each other?

    • Anonymous

      Funny how anything progressive in Maine gets called a “waste of money.”

      • Anonymous

        Funny how your comment does not adress mine. Do you know that answer? If not then dont bother chiming in

    • Anonymous

      man, its  a short article, try reading it. you will find the answer to what they did for 18 weeks.

  • Anonymous

    They make martyrs out of them by teaching them how to violate your 4th Amendment rights with their illegal stops and searches that they call “check points.”

    • Anonymous

      Check points are legal. Police do it all the time. It’s been upheld in the courts as long as it isn’t random and selective. The legality I would question is their right to stop any ATV anywhere with no cause at all, but that has also been deemed legal by the court.

      • However, game wardens can enter your home without a warrant just on suspicion.  They don’t need probable cause.  Wardens have more “freedom” than cops do when it comes to searching your property.

        • Anonymous

          That’s not true. They cannot enter your home without probable cause.

    • Anonymous

      After all these years you’d think you’d grow up.  You’re a convicted poacher who broke numerous fish and game laws causing you to lose your hunting privilidge for life.

      I’m glad they’re out there busting criminals like yourself.

  • Anonymous

    You two are both morons.

  • Just remember, fishing with a worm in a artificial lure only body of water is like a homicide to them.

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, God forbid they’d do the job we hired them to do, and actually protect out wildlife resources. Fish legally and you don’t have anything to worry about. My personal experience with wardens, is that as a department they are professional, courteous, and friendly. If your experiences are different, maybe it’s you, not them.

      • I always fish legally.  Most wardens are friendly and professional.  But in the same way that some cops act, some wardens act like jerks.  Not sure why, I guess they get off on trying to intimidate you or by searching your stuff. 
        I called a warden out on acting inappropriately without reason.  He searched all my stuff, found nothing, then continued to act like a jerk and left.  A little bit of humility and a quick apology would have been more appropriate. 

        • Anonymous

          Every department has its “bad apples”.

      • Well you do not know the bad apples in the Warden Service.

  • Guest

    Congratulations

  • Anonymous

    Other states have done away with the name Game Warden and re-named them Conservation Police Officers and completely revamed the dept. by organizing. Saving big $$$ too as the dept. had too many captains, lieutanants and sergants…took the lieutanants and droped them division wise down to sergants, dropped sergants down to senior conservation police officers and same money only more conservation officers where than out in the field protecting wildlife instead of in the office as manage ment. Too many chiefs and not enough indians so to speak. Saved the dept. big $$$ especially in Virginia where they harvested over 290,000 deer last fall and my son got two bucks 200+ and where you can harvest 6 deer per season. Shows what good conservation can do, as back in the early 70’s it was unheard of to harvest over 10,000 deer per season and than you were allowed one deer like here in Maine. Good sound management.  

  • Anonymous

    The basic foundation of freedom in this country is based on “the right to proceed unhindered except upon probable cause.” Probable cause is defined as “a reasonable and articulable suspicion of a criminal offense.” Wardens are the biggest violators of law of any law enforcement agency in Maine. In 1989, I trained Passamaquoddy tribal rangers. In year 2000, as a result of my 5-year legal effort, the Warden powers statue was changed. Before this change in law, they stopped sportsmen merely to check them out – a blatant violation of the Constitution. If they show up at your house without a summons or a warrant, don’t speak to them except to order them off your property under the threat of being charged with criminal trespass. The law is the law, folks. And it’s time the wardens obeyed the law like we all should.

    • Anonymous

      Laws evolve as needed. Police used to be able to stop you on the roads with only a “routine spot check” as cause. Now they can’t arbitrarily pick you out of the pack for no reason. Same with Game Wardens. We get it, you’re bitter and hold a grudge. Now pat yourself on the back and let it go.

    • Anonymous

      Why do you hate Game Wardens so much?  Never mine…..we know.

      In my 50 years of being a sportsman I’ve had maybe 3 total encounters with a warden….all a pleasent experience.  Show licence…..have a nice day.

      I guess if you break a lot of F&G laws your experiences with Wardens take on a different tone….right, Bill? 

      • PabMainer

        Not to mention the trespassing charges and assaulting a landowner….

    • Anonymous

      He worked as a fish and wildlife consultant for the Passamaquoddy tribe, was a mediator in the Attorney General’s office, a substitute teacher in Winthrop High School, a small claims attorney for 13 years, a 2000 census taker, a worker in Congressman Michaud’s 2002 campaign office and he was Maine’s only full time, unpaid Legislative lobbyist for several years. He was an avid sportsman who was a key player in the formation of the Sportsman Alliance of Maine in 1975. He was an avid writer of letters and editorials on many subjects and was the recipient of the 2000 Millinocket Fin & Feather Club sportsmen of the year award. He was a world traveler and took many trips across the United States and also traveled to Alaska, the Carribean and Venezuela. He spent 7 years of his life as a college student, first at Farmington State Teacher’s College in elementary education, then studying geology at the University of Mississippi, and finally graduating from the University of Maine-Augusta in 1994 with a degree in criminal justice. 

  • Congrats!

  • Anonymous

    does advanced training include how to intimidate people into  giving up their rights for a search and lying skillfully?they would like you to think they have more power than anyone, but they dont,if they say open your trunk ,say no, get a warrant.same with your house. and above all never believe them.

  • NOTICE TO SPORTSMEN (2)

    On November 2, 1998, I met with Chief Game Warden Timothy Peabody of the Inland Fisheries & Wildlife Department and Brian MacMaster of the Attorney Generals office. As a result of my complaint, we discussed unlawful random motor vehicle stops by game wardens. During the meeting, Colonel Peabody furnished me with a Maine Warden Service memorandum that he sent to all wardens, lieutenants & sergeants. The memorandum said in part, Wardens must use the same standard as any other police officers when stopping any motor vehicle. In a hunting situation your authority is further defined under M.R.S.A Title 12, 7053 D-1. After nearly four years of mediation between myself and the Maine Warden Service, Colonel Peabody has finally acknowledged that game wardens do not have the right and are in violation of the law if they randomly stop you without reasonable and articulable suspicion that you have violated the law. In other words, they have no right to stop you simply because they want to. However, game wardens may stop you without any suspicion of an offense at what they call a highway checkpoint and inspection. This “roadblock type” stop must be done per Warden Service policy #18.

    WORDS OF ADVICE

    If you are stopped randomly by a single game warden or at a roadblock, be courteous; but object to the stop as being in violation of your constitutional rights. You do not have any obligation to answer any questions and I highly recommend that you do not have any conversation whatsoever with the game warden. You have no obligation and are not required to let them search your vehicle or any containers. You have no obligation whatsoever to show them any fish or wildlife that you may have in your possession. However, the law does require that when transporting fish and wildlife, they must be “open to view.” “Open to view” does not mean what most sportsmen think it means. According to the Court, “open to view” means not hidden. Examples are: fish in a cooler are “open to view,” and a deer in the back of a pickup truck with the tailgate up can be “open to view.” You have no obligation to show them any firearm or whether the firearm is unloaded or not.
    Some Maine game wardens are extremely assertive and coercive. Many sportsmen find these particular wardens so intimidating and aggressive that they are willing to yield their 4th Amendment rights. Please understand that if you engage in a conversation other than preserving your rights by objecting to the stop or if you consent to any search of your person, vehicle or containers, you will likely have given up your 4th Amendment rights.
    In a recent Maine decision, the Court stated that the only lawful method of stopping a motor vehicle is when a game warden uses a hand signal, a voice command, or a flashing blue light. Maine game wardens have various clever ways of getting you to stop. They will claim that you stopped of your own accord such as they did in the Washington County Cilley case.
    You do not have to and you should not give a game warden, a department employee, a guide, or a landowner your license when he asks to see it. The law only requires that you exhibit your license when you are actually hunting, fishing, trapping, or trespassing.
    And last, please be aware that it is not unlawful for a game warden to lie to you. Many of them will. However, it is against the law for them to use any threats or coercion in order to gain consent to search your vehicle or possessions.
    In summation, you probably do not have to do anything that a game warden asks you to do, except: (1) When hunting, fishing or trapping, you must exhibit your license; (2) You must, upon proper signal, stop any conveyance you are operating; (3) You must come ashore upon request if you are in a watercraft, and (4) You must sign the uniform summons. If a game warden has the authority to do something, usually they don’t have to ask you to do anything. They simply act according to their authority.
    Some members of the Maine Warden Service have done their best to destroy my credibility and I suspect that those certain ones will continue to do so. Some wardens consider me a threat to their unlawful methods of intimidating the law-abiding sportsmen.

  • NOTICE TO SPORTSMEN (2)

    On November 2, 1998, I met with Chief Game Warden Timothy Peabody of the Inland Fisheries & Wildlife Department and Brian MacMaster of the Attorney Generals office. As a result of my complaint, we discussed unlawful random motor vehicle stops by game wardens. During the meeting, Colonel Peabody furnished me with a Maine Warden Service memorandum that he sent to all wardens, lieutenants & sergeants. The memorandum said in part, Wardens must use the same standard as any other police officers when stopping any motor vehicle. In a hunting situation your authority is further defined under M.R.S.A Title 12, 7053 D-1. After nearly four years of mediation between myself and the Maine Warden Service, Colonel Peabody has finally acknowledged that game wardens do not have the right and are in violation of the law if they randomly stop you without reasonable and articulable suspicion that you have violated the law. In other words, they have no right to stop you simply because they want to. However, game wardens may stop you without any suspicion of an offense at what they call a highway checkpoint and inspection. This “roadblock type” stop must be done per Warden Service policy #18.

    WORDS OF ADVICE

    If you are stopped randomly by a single game warden or at a roadblock, be courteous; but object to the stop as being in violation of your constitutional rights. You do not have any obligation to answer any questions and I highly recommend that you do not have any conversation whatsoever with the game warden. You have no obligation and are not required to let them search your vehicle or any containers. You have no obligation whatsoever to show them any fish or wildlife that you may have in your possession. However, the law does require that when transporting fish and wildlife, they must be “open to view.” “Open to view” does not mean what most sportsmen think it means. According to the Court, “open to view” means not hidden. Examples are: fish in a cooler are “open to view,” and a deer in the back of a pickup truck with the tailgate up can be “open to view.” You have no obligation to show them any firearm or whether the firearm is unloaded or not.
    Some Maine game wardens are extremely assertive and coercive. Many sportsmen find these particular wardens so intimidating and aggressive that they are willing to yield their 4th Amendment rights. Please understand that if you engage in a conversation other than preserving your rights by objecting to the stop or if you consent to any search of your person, vehicle or containers, you will likely have given up your 4th Amendment rights.
    In a recent Maine decision, the Court stated that the only lawful method of stopping a motor vehicle is when a game warden uses a hand signal, a voice command, or a flashing blue light. Maine game wardens have various clever ways of getting you to stop. They will claim that you stopped of your own accord such as they did in the Washington County Cilley case.
    You do not have to and you should not give a game warden, a department employee, a guide, or a landowner your license when he asks to see it. The law only requires that you exhibit your license when you are actually hunting, fishing, trapping, or trespassing.
    And last, please be aware that it is not unlawful for a game warden to lie to you. Many of them will. However, it is against the law for them to use any threats or coercion in order to gain consent to search your vehicle or possessions.
    In summation, you probably do not have to do anything that a game warden asks you to do, except: (1) When hunting, fishing or trapping, you must exhibit your license; (2) You must, upon proper signal, stop any conveyance you are operating; (3) You must come ashore upon request if you are in a watercraft, and (4) You must sign the uniform summons. If a game warden has the authority to do something, usually they don’t have to ask you to do anything. They simply act according to their authority.
    Some members of the Maine Warden Service have done their best to destroy my credibility and I suspect that those certain ones will continue to do so. Some wardens consider me a threat to their unlawful methods of intimidating the law-abiding sportsmen.

    • Anonymous

      excellent post  thanks much, i have seen and been asked by wardens to help them target people they suspected of something the targeting in a couple cases has went on for many years.  I have also seen them years later bring up a comment someone made or an appearance of someone as if it was relevant and evidence supporting some future accusation of wrongdoing. I also know a fellow who was told they would drop charges to this or that if he admitted to something and when he did they did not honor their word saying they only said that to trick him

  • NOTICE TO SPORTSMEN (2)

    On November 2, 1998, I met with Chief Game Warden Timothy Peabody of the Inland Fisheries & Wildlife Department and Brian MacMaster of the Attorney Generals office. As a result of my complaint, we discussed unlawful random motor vehicle stops by game wardens. During the meeting, Colonel Peabody furnished me with a Maine Warden Service memorandum that he sent to all wardens, lieutenants & sergeants. The memorandum said in part, Wardens must use the same standard as any other police officers when stopping any motor vehicle. In a hunting situation your authority is further defined under M.R.S.A Title 12, 7053 D-1. After nearly four years of mediation between myself and the Maine Warden Service, Colonel Peabody has finally acknowledged that game wardens do not have the right and are in violation of the law if they randomly stop you without reasonable and articulable suspicion that you have violated the law. In other words, they have no right to stop you simply because they want to. However, game wardens may stop you without any suspicion of an offense at what they call a highway checkpoint and inspection. This “roadblock type” stop must be done per Warden Service policy #18.

  • Anonymous

    Wow…after reading this short article, and then the comments, all I can say is wow. I’ve worked in the woods most of my life. I’ve had many encounters with Wardens. I’ve only met a couple with any attitude. Most of the time they are pleasant and decent. Most of the time it’s ask for a license, and see you later. Some have even told me where there’s been some really good fishing.  

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