Homeless teen to get science prize

Posted Jan. 13, 2012, at 9:01 p.m.

BRENTWOOD, N.Y. — A homeless New York teenager who’s a national Intel science competition semifinalist won’t be homeless for much longer.

Samantha Garvey and her family were offered a rent-subsidized home by officials in the Long Island county where she goes to school.

Garvey is one of 61 Long Island students who have a chance at the competition’s top prize of $100,000.

The 17-year-old and her family moved into a homeless shelter on Jan. 1.

Suffolk County officials made the housing announcement Friday morning at Brentwood High School, where Garvey is a senior. County official Steve Bellone says the Garvey family can move in about 10 days.

Garvey’s Intel project focused on predators’ effects on ribbed mussels.

She’s one of 300 semifinalists nationally. Finalists will be announced later this month.

Financial analyst wins $208M lottery

MIDDLE ISLAND, N.Y. — A Silicon Valley financial analyst came forward Friday to claim a $208 million lottery jackpot after buying the winning ticket in New York last month.

Daniel Bruckner of San Jose, Calif., and his wife, Christine, joined New York State Lottery officials at the Long Island supermarket where the lucky Mega Millions ticket was sold.

They said they would take a lump-sum payment that will leave them with $101 million after taxes, lottery officials said.

“It’s very surreal,” Bruckner said. “It’s exciting, but very surreal.”

The winning Mega Millions numbers were drawn on Dec. 27. Bruckner, 35, said he bought the ticket while visiting relatives on Long Island over the holidays. He said he typically shops at the store when he is in the area.

Bruckner, who said he was born and raised in California, and his wife, who grew up on Long Island, said they have not decided what to do with their money. They declined to say whether they had children.

Marines name general to handle video probe

WASHINGTON — The Marine Corps on Friday laid the groundwork for deciding what, if any, disciplinary action will be taken in the case of an Internet video purporting to show Marine snipers urinating on dead bodies in Afghanistan.

The top Marine officer, Gen. James Amos, appointed three-star Gen. Thomas Waldhauser to oversee the case. Waldhauser named another officer to do an internal Marine Corps investigation, which is in addition to a criminal probe under way by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

Waldhauser will decide what to do as a result of the investigations.

In Afghanistan, a senior US commander issued a letter to all personnel in the international coalition that is fighting the war, explicitly reminding them of the need to respect the dead.

“Defiling, desecrating, mocking, photographing or filming for personal use insurgent dead constitutes a grave breach of the LOAC (laws of armed conflict), violate basic standards of human decency and can cause serious damage to relations with the Afghan government,” Scaparrotti wrote. He ordered all commanders to remind their subordinates of their duty to comply.

Tanker inches toward Nome to deliver fuel

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A Russian tanker has muscled its way through hundreds of miles of Bering Sea ice several feet thick to deliver fuel to Nome. Now comes the tricky part: Getting more than a million gallons of diesel and gasoline to shore through a mile-long hose without a spill.

The problem is that Nome’s harbor is iced-in, preventing the 370-foot tanker from getting to the city dock. It will have to moor offshore to transfer the 1.3 million gallons across the ice and to fuel headers at the dock.

For days, operations officials have looked at how best to lay the segmented fuel hose across the shore ice for the transfer. They were waiting for daylight Friday to get a better look at any changes overnight.

A Coast Guard icebreaker escorted the tanker through the Bering Sea pack ice, the two vessels at times barely crawling along as officials looked for new techniques to get the tanker free of shifting ice.

Late Thursday, the Coast Guard Cutter Healy and the Renda stopped six miles offshore to wait for daylight and figure out how to get the tanker within about a mile of the harbor so its hose will reach the dock.

France loses top credit rating

PARIS — France was stripped Friday of its top-notch credit rating and rumors swirled in financial markets that its debt-burdened neighbors would be next, complicating Europe’s efforts to solve its financial crisis.

Finance Minister Francois Baroin told a French TV station that France had been downgraded by one notch by credit rating agency Standard & Poor’s. That would mean a rating of AA+, the same as the United States since it was downgraded last summer.

Rumors coursed through the markets that Austria and Italy could be downgraded next, perhaps as early as the end of the day’s stock trading in New York. S&P had warned 15 European nations in December that they were at risk for a downgrade.

Baroin said France had received a change to its rating “like most of the eurozone,” referring to the 17 European nations that use the euro currency, but there was no confirmation from S&P that any other nation had been downgraded Friday.

France is the second-largest contributor behind Germany to Europe’s financial rescue fund. The fund still has a rating of AAA, which means that it can borrow on the bond market at low rates.

SEE COMMENTS →

ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business
ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business

Similar Articles

More in Nation