December 16, 2017
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Comments for: Worshippers dance in the aisles as spirit fills Bangor seminary’s Convocation

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  • Anonymous

    “Humanitarian spirituality” is nothing new–just look up the Humanist Manifestos I and II and you will find it there, along with Marxist theology.  Salvation in the 21st century is the same as when God brought His Son into the world not to condemn the world but to save us from sin by dying for us on the cross.  Just “being a good human being” is not the way to Salvation.  That assumption is why we have so many church leaders straying from what God teaches us in His Word, thus through their teachings they are taking many to the depths of hell with them, not to the heighths of Heaven. 
    Gopher 40–read the Humanist Manifesto–there is a connection to he hedonistic spirituality that is permeating our churches and society.

    • Anonymous

      ““There’s no reason to stop traditional ministry,” he said. “But know that it doesn’t reach everybody.  Not a this-or-that decision. It’s this and that. Let the spirit of God lead people where it leads them.””
       
      Reread and dwell on this paragraph.  No need to link Humanitarian Spirituality with the Humanist Manifestos (other than sharing the fragment “human”, I doubt that there’s any connection.
       
      Being a traditional, main-line Protestant, I treasure the music I’ve sung (and heard sung) for decades.  I’m also open to new venues of church presentation.  I’m not sure that I’d appreciate some of the music presented at the colloquium without hearing it, but I’d give it chance.   Churches in general are losing younger people (and of course older people through natural attrition).  As the author said, it doen’t have to be one or the other.  Faith is a personal thing.
       
      Music, art, and yes, even dance, have furthered the religious experience for millenia (one definition of “Carol” involves dance).  We have extant over a millenium of religious music in a number of languages.  At my church we sing the “classics”, 19th century hymnody, Appalachian, spirituals, chant, and contemporary (the choir also adds some Gospel).  All of this is a furthering of joy, a concept and feeling I find absent in much of conservative religion.  If you base your entire faith and spiritual experience on a few verses of the Gospel of John (or even the entire book) and the first couple chapters of Genesis, there isn’t much joy to along with these statements of faith.  Faith is a journey.  Enjoy it.

  • Anonymous

    Has this Rev. Lewis ever read the New Testament? If humanism could truly
    make it on its own, then no God or Holy Spirit is needed, so this “humanitarian
    spirituality” is a stone-cold oxymoron.

  • Anonymous

    If we could be “good enough” there would have been no need for Jesus to die on the cross in our place. We don’t need creative ways to attract people, we need Gods word, the bible preached for it has the power to convict one of one’s sins and lead one to repentance.

  • Guest

    I remember being sent to Pentecostal Bible Camp in Bridgwater several times when I was around  9 or 10.

    The sight of people rolling on the sawdust floors and marching in the isles of the Tabernacle speaking in tongues every night for 2 weeks was terrifying! UGH!

    • Anonymous

      From the headline, my first impression was, “sounds like Holy Roller/Pentacostal”.  Apparently, it isn’t really.  As I said in my other post, a little variety in worship music is always welcome.  Some of the gospel music our choir has done has even got this two-left-footed non-dancer wanting to do the “stroll” (although I didn’t).

      • Guest

        Thanks for your well worded posts. Make a joyful noise unto the Lord is great, choirs are wonderful, but people literally doing a trance-like writhe and roll on sawdust is a bit much for me.
        I would be doubtful of ‘The Speaking of Tongues’ but as a child I witnessed my Greatgrandmother interpret many times. And she was no con-artist Pharisee.

        (And yes, I was brought up Pentecostal)

        • Anonymous

          Bulzno, I agree with your negative impressions of Holy Roller activities (I’m aslo doubtful about speaking in tongues but I have no 1st or 2nd hand experience) .  However, my fears of that sort by reading only the headline were thankfully allayed by the more appropriate spiritual “happenings” at the convocation.  And no, I was not raised Pentacostal, more main-line, but somewhat conservative Proteastant.

  • Anonymous

    Apparently this article was reprinted verbatim in the print BDN for Sat.-Sun. 1/14-15, p. C5.  Curious.

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