Snow forecast for much of Maine with up to 10 inches in St. John Valley

A team of sled dogs trains along a snow-covered back road in Fort Kent Wednesday afternoon after the area received about 2 inches of snow between Tuesday and Wednesday. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for much of the state with up to 10 inches more expected to fall on the St. John Valley late Wednesday night into Thursday afternoon.
Special to the BDN by Julia Bayly
A team of sled dogs trains along a snow-covered back road in Fort Kent Wednesday afternoon after the area received about 2 inches of snow between Tuesday and Wednesday. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for much of the state with up to 10 inches more expected to fall on the St. John Valley late Wednesday night into Thursday afternoon.
By Julia Bayly, BDN Staff
Posted Dec. 07, 2011, at 5:51 p.m.

FORT KENT, Maine — Northern Maine received about 2 inches of snow between Tuesday and Wednesday, but more was expected for much of the state.

The National Weather Service on Wednesday afternoon issued winter weather warnings from Portland to the St. John Valley where up to 10 inches of snow was forecast to fall from late Wednesday night into Thursday afternoon.

The winter storm warning covered all of northern Maine and extended in a southwest line to the Maine-New Hampshire border including the entire St. John Valley, Caribou and Presque Isle to Greenville, Jackman and the Rangeley area. The weather service forecast heavy, wet snow which could mix with freezing rain in more southern parts of the state.

A winter weather advisory was issued for an area from Houlton south through Maine to the New Hampshire border at Conway, N.H., where a messy, wintry mix of snow and rain is expected with total snow accumulations of up to 4 inches. Gale and hazardous weather warnings were in effect from Bangor east along the Maine coast from 7 a.m. through 10 p.m. Thursday.

The low pressure system bringing the storm into Maine was expected to move through the Gulf of Maine and bring with it winds up to 28 mph and widespread rain. With the official start to winter still more than two weeks away, southern and central Maine already have seen significant snowfalls this season.

The storm could bring the first measurable snow to northern Maine and with it the transition to winter activities including skiing, snowmobiling and dog sledding.

http://bangordailynews.com/2011/12/07/news/aroostook/snow-forecast-for-much-of-maine-with-up-to-10-inches-in-st-john-valley/ printed on August 1, 2014