GEAR BOX

Jetboil Sol Ti

Jetboil’s new Sol Ti model (titanium cooking cup); 11.9 ounces; $149.95
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Jetboil’s new Sol Ti model (titanium cooking cup); 11.9 ounces; $149.95
Posted Oct. 28, 2011, at 5:45 p.m.

Price: $149.95

Weight: 11.9 ounces

Jetboil’s new Sol Ti model (titanium cooking cup) is designed for the gear wonk in all of us — it’s compact, lightweight, has fast boil times and is pleasing to the eye.

Jetboil’s PCS, personal cooking system, model made its debut in 2004, and the revolutionary flux ring design caught on and built immediate devotees. Basically the ring is a continuous finned element that acts as a sink, capturing the stove burner’s heat that normally escapes up the side of the cook pot and channels it to the bottom of the pot.

Boil times with the original PCS in ideal conditions were little less than four minutes for 2 cups of water using iso-butane fuel cartridges. Back then that time was considered short, and the convenience of a canister stove made the PCS a hiker and climber’s go-to choice. At slightly over a pound without fuel it seemed light enough.

But it wasn’t without some foibles, the worst of which was cold-weather performance. If you wanted performance from the stove in temperatures below freezing you had to preheat the canister in your pocket or place it in warm water to keep the gas warm enough to vaporize and run the stove.

Jetboil engineers went back to the drawing boards, and the Sol line will impress those of you who are looking for a fast way to heat water in most conditions down to about 20 degrees F. The titanium version with canister support, pot support, cup, cozy and lid tipped my scales at 340 grams (11.9 ounces) and when packed is about an inch shorter than the PCS. I got consistent rolling boil times for 2 cups of water in the 1:30 to 1:45 time range.

That’s more than two minutes faster and 5 ounces less weight than the PCS. (True gear wonks will remove the cozy and measuring cup-flux ring protector, take out the pot support and the gas canister support and come up with a bare stove-cook cup weight of 7.35 ounces.

Me? Since I carry my gear mostly in a kayak, I’ll “struggle” with the extra 5 ounces and revel in the convenience of the insulated cup and sipping lid that keeps me from burning my fingers and lips. On those occasional winter outings, I’ll definitely take the Sol Ti. (And I’ll probably throw in my Soto OD1R as a backup. At only 3.6 ounces with bag and windscreen, who wouldn’t?)

If you have Jetboil accessories or other Jetboil cooking pots, don’t worry, the Sol will be right at home with them.

 

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