CDC: 1 in 25 adolescents take drugs for depression

Posted Oct. 19, 2011, at 9:17 p.m.

ATLANTA — Roughly 1 in 25 adolescents in the United States are taking antidepressants, according to a new government study billed as the first to offer such statistics on that age group.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday reported the figure for kids ages 12 to 17. It’s based on surveys and depression screenings of about 12,000 U.S. adolescents and adults during the years 2005 through 2008.

The study found about 1 in 10 adults take antidepressants. The researchers said only one-third of people in the study with symptoms of depression were taking medication.

Rates of antidepressant use were about the same in different income groups, even though earlier research had shown higher rates of depression among the poor. Women take antidepressants more than men, and whites use them more than blacks or Mexican-Americans, the study also found.

Also, more than 60 percent of Americans taking antidepressants have been taking a medication two years or longer, and 14 percent have been taking such a drug for 10 years or more.

Store clerk in Florida shoots, kills would-be robber

TAMPA, Fla. — A convenience store manager grabbed a gun from under the counter and shot a would-be robber in the knee before the man scooped up the clerk’s infant daughter and tried to flee, sheriff’s deputies said Wednesday.

Daniel Ramont Hernandez, 32, died at a hospital after the Tuesday afternoon shooting at Del’s 24-Hour Food Store in Naples, according to the Collier County Sheriff’s Office. The child wasn’t hurt.

Hernandez came in the store acting erratically, causing 22-year-old manager Elizabeth Easterly to be worried for her safety, according to the sheriff’s office. When Hernandez came to her side of the counter, she grabbed a gun and shot him once in the leg.

When she ran outside to alert a school crossing guard, Hernandez grabbed the stroller with Easterly’s child and carried it toward the door. He put the stroller down, ran outside and was tackled by another man who was coming to work, the report said.

The shooting is still under investigation.

2 US soldiers killed in Afghanistan

KABUL, Afghanistan — There is snow on the mountain peaks and the summer “fighting season” is drawing to a close. But battlefield violence continues to claim the lives of coalition troops in Afghanistan.

Two Americans and seven Afghan troops were killed Wednesday in three incidents, Afghan and Western officials said.

The two U.S. soldiers were killed by an improvised explosive device, or IED, in the east, military officials said. The region, near the Pakistan border, has been the scene of some of the year’s heaviest fighting, and IEDs remain the leading killer of Western soldiers.

Four Afghan soldiers and an officer were killed in an explosion in Herat province, in the west. It has traditionally been one of the calmer areas of the country, but this week the main Afghan intelligence service, the National Directorate for Security said it had arrested a member of the Taliban’s main leadership council, the Quetta Shura, in Herat.

Old German satellite hurtles toward Earth

BERLIN — A retired satellite is hurtling toward the atmosphere and pieces of it could crash into the Earth as early as Friday, the German Aerospace Center says.

Scientists are no longer able to communicate with the dead German satellite ROSAT, which orbits the earth every 90 minutes, and experts are not sure exactly where pieces of it could land.

Parts of the satellite, which is the size of a minivan, will burn up during re-entry but up to 30 fragments weighing a total of 1.87 tons could crash into the Earth between 53 degrees north and 53 degrees south sometime between Friday and Monday, center spokesman Andreas Schuetz told The Associated Press. Bangor, Maine, is at roughly 45 degrees north latitude.

The 2.69-ton scientific satellite was launched in 1990 and retired in 1999 after being used for research on black holes and neutron stars and performing the first all-sky survey of X-ray sources with an imaging telescope.

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