Maine Forest Service fire detection icon finds new home in Greenville

Posted Oct. 18, 2011, at 2:46 p.m.
Last modified Oct. 19, 2011, at 11:36 a.m.
Several Maine Forest Service employees dismantle the historic fire tower on Big Moose Mountain in Greenville.
Maine Forest Service
Several Maine Forest Service employees dismantle the historic fire tower on Big Moose Mountain in Greenville.
 The main structure of the Big Moose Mountain Fire Tower was relocated to the Natural Resource Education Center in Greenville by the Maine Forest Service.
Maine Forest Service
The main structure of the Big Moose Mountain Fire Tower was relocated to the Natural Resource Education Center in Greenville by the Maine Forest Service.
A Maine Forest Service UH-1 “Huey”  helicopter and Helitack crew was used to slingload the remaining parts of the fire detection tower off Big Moose Mountain in Greenville. <<Big Moose Mtn Fire Tower 11 Oct 11.


<> <<Big Moose Mtn tower 11
Maine Forest Service
A Maine Forest Service UH-1 “Huey” helicopter and Helitack crew was used to slingload the remaining parts of the fire detection tower off Big Moose Mountain in Greenville. <<Big Moose Mtn Fire Tower 11 Oct 11. <> <<Big Moose Mtn tower 11

AUGUSTA, Maine — After several years of planning with state and nonprofit organizations, the historic Big Moose Mountain Fire Tower now rests in a safe place.

On Oct. 11 the tower was airlifted off the mountain by the Maine Forest Service and placed in the Natural Resources Education Center in the shadow of Moose Mountain on Route 15, just south of Greenville.

The original fire tower, which was erected in 1905, was one of the first forest fire detection towers in the country. Over the years, the harsh Maine winters and several lightning strikes deteriorated the steel towers and cab that replaced the original wood tower.

Maine’s entire fire detection tower system was discontinued in 1991 in favor of contracted air detection flights that were more efficient and are still in use today.

During the last five years, various options were considered for refurbishing the fire tower. In 2010, the MFS agreed to dismantle and transport the tower to the NREC site so the public could enjoy the tower safely. The weathered tower and cab will need to be reconstructed to meet safety standards before it will be open to the public. The Forest Fire Lookout Association and NREC will coordinate the efforts to rebuild the tower in its new location.

For more information, visit http://www.firelookout.org/towers/me/hiltonlegacy/page2.htm, http://www.naturalresourceeducationcenter.org/ or http://www.maine.gov/doc/mfs/

SEE COMMENTS →

ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business
ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business

Similar Articles

More in Outdoors