Bill Cosby, Chita Rivera to share NYC benefit show

Posted Oct. 06, 2011, at 9:13 p.m.
Last modified Oct. 07, 2011, at 9:51 a.m.
In this Dec. 7, 2010 file photo, comedian Bill Cosby, left, is shown at a cocktail reception prior to the 2010 College Football Hall of Fame awards dinner in New York. Cosby and actress Chita Rivera will celebrate Art Start's 20th anniversary with a benefit show on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011.
Kathy Willens | AP
In this Dec. 7, 2010 file photo, comedian Bill Cosby, left, is shown at a cocktail reception prior to the 2010 College Football Hall of Fame awards dinner in New York. Cosby and actress Chita Rivera will celebrate Art Start's 20th anniversary with a benefit show on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011.

NEW YORK — At 74, Bill Cosby says he doesn’t want to dawdle.

“When you hit the 70 mark, some of your friends have been destroyed or are dead,” the comedian and activist says by phone. “You keep going, but you do have a feeling that as you’re walking forward, someone’s turning the lights out behind you.”

One of America’s most beloved and groundbreaking joke-tellers, Cosby has leveraged his fame — he is the first black actor to win a lead actor Emmy and beloved for his groundbreaking series “The Cosby Show” — to give back.

“We really don’t want waste time,” he says of his septuagenarian peers. “I just don’t want to leave without thanking those who are doing good. It doesn’t have to be a big thing.”

Cosby has found one of those things in an Oct. 13 benefit for the organization Art Smart at New York City’s 1,500-seat Town Hall. The comedian will be joined by Chita Rivera and Mark Nadler for a one-night-only performance of “Laugh, Sing, Dance.”

“I’ll do part of my show that I’ve been doing around the country,” says Rivera, 78, who is an old friend of Cosby’s. She’ll be singing songs from musicals she’s most famous for, including “Kiss of the Spider Woman,” “Chicago,” “West Side Story” and “Bye Bye Birdie.”

Toxicologist: Jackson had propofol throughout body

LOS ANGELES — The coroner’s chief toxicologist says the powerful anesthetic propofol was found in Michael Jackson’s blood, urine and liver when he died.

Witness Dan Anderson testified Thursday at the involuntary manslaughter trial of Dr. Conrad Murray.

Anderson says Jackson showed no signs of opiates or the painkiller Demerol.

He says drugs detected in significant amounts were propofol, lidocaine and lorazepam, a sedative that Murray said he gave to try to get Jackson to sleep before he administered propofol.

Anderson says lorazepam was found at the high therapeutic level, but he did not characterize the amount of propofol.

Authorities say Jackson died of acute propofol intoxication combined with other sedatives administered by Murray, who has pleaded not guilty.

Rapper Jim Jones guilty in NY Bentley driving case

NEW YORK — Rapper Jim Jones pleaded guilty Thursday to driving his Bentley with a suspended license.

The hip-hop artist and actor, whose “We Fly High” was one of 2007’s top-selling rap tracks, admitted to a traffic misdemeanor and was fined $200.

Jones was pulled over March 30, telling police he was heading to a video shoot, according to court documents.

The rapper hadn’t realized his license had been suspended over a traffic ticket he hadn’t fully paid, said his lawyer, Marianne E. Bertuna.

“If it was as simple as paying a fine, he would have. He just didn’t know about it” and has since cleared it up, she said.

Jones wanted to resolve the case to get on with his career and a charity project, Bertuna said. He has worked with the Entertainers 4 Education Alliance, a New York-based group that harnesses celebrities’ star power to promote education and social commitment to young people.

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