ESPN pulls intro after Hank Williams Jr.’s Obama comments

Posted Oct. 03, 2011, at 9:28 p.m.
Last modified Oct. 03, 2011, at 10:18 p.m.

BRISTOL, Conn. — ESPN is pulling Hank Williams Jr.’s classic intro song from its broadcast of Monday night’s NFL game after the country singer famous for the line “Are you ready for some football?” used an analogy to Adolf Hitler in discussing President Barack Obama.

In an interview Monday morning on Fox News’ “Fox & Friends,” Williams said of Obama’s outing on the links with House Speaker John Boehner: “It’d be like Hitler playing golf with [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin] Netanyahu.”

Asked to clarify, Williams said: “They’re the enemy,” adding that by “they” he meant Obama and Vice President Joe Biden.

“While Hank Williams Jr. is not an ESPN employee, we recognize that he is closely linked to our company through the open to ‘Monday Night Football,”’ ESPN said in a statement. “We are extremely disappointed with his comments, and as a result we have decided to pull the open from tonight’s telecast.”

ESPN did not say whether the intro, synonymous with “Monday Night Football” since 1989, would be used again after this week’s Buccaneers-Colts game.

The song “All My Rowdy Friends Are Here on Monday Night” is a remixed version of his 1984 hit “All My Rowdy Friends are Coming Over Tonight.” The version won Williams four Emmy Awards in the early 1990s as the opening theme to “Monday Night Football,” then on ABC.

ER doc: Jackson physician never mentioned propofol

LOS ANGELES — Michael Jackson was clinically dead when he arrived at a hospital and two emergency room doctors said they thought it was futile to attempt to revive him. His doctor, however, insisted that they try.

Both doctors, testifying at Dr. Conrad Murray’s involuntary manslaughter trial Monday, said Murray failed to tell them that he had been giving Jackson the anesthetic propofol or when Jackson had been medicated or stopped breathing.

“He said he did not have any concept of time, that he did not have a watch,” said Dr. Thao Nguyen, a cardiologist at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, where Jackson was taken on June 25, 2009.

“Dr. Murray asked that we not give up easily and try to save Michael Jackson’s life,” she said. “In Dr. Murray’s mind, if we called it quits, we would be giving up easily.”

Nguyen said Murray “sounded desperate and he looked devastated.” But, she said, without knowing how much time had passed since he stopped breathing, resuscitation was a remote hope.

“It was not too little too late,” she said. “It was a case of too late. I feared that time was not on Mr. Jackson’s side.”

Murray, 58, has pleaded not guilty. Authorities say Murray administered the fatal dose and acted recklessly by providing Jackson the drug as a sleep aid at his home when it is supposed to be administered in a hospital. The defense argues that Jackson gave himself an additional dose of the drug when Murray was out of the room.

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