SLIDE SHOW

Dog day afternoon

Posted Sept. 13, 2011, at 12:49 p.m.
Trainer Dale Southards of Raymond talks a little about how he uses some of the training tools displayed on the table.
Julie Murchison Harris
Trainer Dale Southards of Raymond talks a little about how he uses some of the training tools displayed on the table.
CMBC president John Short of Acton explains some training techniques to one of the participants, while using her dog to show her what he's talking about.
Ann Short
CMBC president John Short of Acton explains some training techniques to one of the participants, while using her dog to show her what he's talking about.
CMBC's Gary Anderson of Stillwater placed a live pigeon in front of a young puppy to encourage the dog's natural instincts to hunt and point birds to kick in.
Julie Murchison Harris
CMBC's Gary Anderson of Stillwater placed a live pigeon in front of a young puppy to encourage the dog's natural instincts to hunt and point birds to kick in.
Northern New England Brittany Club member Steve Belletti describes what occurs during a hunt test. The hunt test instructor explained the differences between hunt tests and field trials.
Ann Short
Northern New England Brittany Club member Steve Belletti describes what occurs during a hunt test. The hunt test instructor explained the differences between hunt tests and field trials.
CMBC's Gary Anderson of Stillwater introduces some young dogs to live pigeons, which often are used in training. Pigeons are great for training because they will fly away if the dog gives chase after the point. Quail and other species often will run along the ground and be at risk of being caught by the dog.
Julie Murchison Harris
CMBC's Gary Anderson of Stillwater introduces some young dogs to live pigeons, which often are used in training. Pigeons are great for training because they will fly away if the dog gives chase after the point. Quail and other species often will run along the ground and be at risk of being caught by the dog.
Trainer Dale Southards of Raymond demonstrates how to use what you have for equipment to fine tune some of the dog's actions. Here he is showing how to use a dog crate to teach the animal not to creep up on a bird after the dog's initial pointing of the bird.
Julie Murchison Harris
Trainer Dale Southards of Raymond demonstrates how to use what you have for equipment to fine tune some of the dog's actions. Here he is showing how to use a dog crate to teach the animal not to creep up on a bird after the dog's initial pointing of the bird.
Bob Paucek of Buxton and CMBC member Gary Anderson of Stillwater explain the use of the whoa post. Pointing dogs are expected to hold their point until the hunter flushes and shoots the bird. There are several techniques for training this skill, including the whoa post, which Gary's dog Gunner is demonstrating. Gary is first vice president (field trials) of CMBC.
Julie Murchison Harris
Bob Paucek of Buxton and CMBC member Gary Anderson of Stillwater explain the use of the whoa post. Pointing dogs are expected to hold their point until the hunter flushes and shoots the bird. There are several techniques for training this skill, including the whoa post, which Gary's dog Gunner is demonstrating. Gary is first vice president (field trials) of CMBC.
Dog trainer Bob Paucek of Buxton explained various pieces of equipment used to train pointing dogs.
Julie Murchison Harris
Dog trainer Bob Paucek of Buxton explained various pieces of equipment used to train pointing dogs.
Approximately 35 people attended the Central Maine Brittany Club's fall Pointing Dog Training Day on Saturday, Sept. 10, at Brownfield Game Management Area near Fryeburg, also known as Maine Bird Dog Club Trial Grounds.
Julie Murchison Harris
Approximately 35 people attended the Central Maine Brittany Club's fall Pointing Dog Training Day on Saturday, Sept. 10, at Brownfield Game Management Area near Fryeburg, also known as Maine Bird Dog Club Trial Grounds.
Pointing dog trainer Bob Paucek of Buxton explains the use of a check cord to help guide a dog's actions in the early stages of training to be a gun dog.
Julie Murchison Harris
Pointing dog trainer Bob Paucek of Buxton explains the use of a check cord to help guide a dog's actions in the early stages of training to be a gun dog.
After a morning of learning training techniques, the afternoon was spent in the woods with the dogs. This group is heading for the woods where live quail have been "planted" for the dogs to find and point. Once the dog is on point, the handler walks into the area where the dog is pointing, flushes the bird and shoots a blank gun, if the dog is conditioned to hearing gunfire already. This exercise is meant to simulate the actual hunting experience, and is used in field trials and hunt tests.
Ann Short
After a morning of learning training techniques, the afternoon was spent in the woods with the dogs. This group is heading for the woods where live quail have been "planted" for the dogs to find and point. Once the dog is on point, the handler walks into the area where the dog is pointing, flushes the bird and shoots a blank gun, if the dog is conditioned to hearing gunfire already. This exercise is meant to simulate the actual hunting experience, and is used in field trials and hunt tests.
Two puppies point a bird in the woods. Puppies are introduced to this process very gently, just to awaken their natural instincts and to give the owner a quick glimpse at what the animals most likely will do naturally as adults. These puppies are littermates, and naturally pointed birds and backed each other. No blank gun was used when doing these exercises with puppies in the woods.
Ann Short
Two puppies point a bird in the woods. Puppies are introduced to this process very gently, just to awaken their natural instincts and to give the owner a quick glimpse at what the animals most likely will do naturally as adults. These puppies are littermates, and naturally pointed birds and backed each other. No blank gun was used when doing these exercises with puppies in the woods.

FRYEBURG — The Central Maine Brittany Club held a Pointing Dog Training Day on Saturday, Sept. 10, at Brownfield Game Management Area near Fryeburg, also known as Maine Bird Dog Club Trial Grounds. The morning was dedicated to various trainers explaining their techniques for training gun dogs, and the afternoon was spent in the woods with the dogs as they tried to find and point live quail that were “planted” for the dogs to find. The event attracted about 35 people from around New England, including a couple of families with children. The techniques learned Saturday are used during field trials and hunt tests, which simulate the experience of hunting game birds with pointing dogs. Central Maine Brittany Club has members from all over New England. Visit its website www.cmbrittanyclub.com to find information on future activities sponsored by the club.

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