YESTERDAY ...

YESTERDAY …

The State of Maine Little League Champions from Bangor's West Side lost in the first round of the New England Regionals by a score of 10-2 to Barre, Vermont's entry. The West Siders compiled an outstanding record on their way to the top and the Maine championship. Front row, left to right: Roger Tracy, Peter McEvoy, Mike McNamera, Jim Young, Gene Weltz, Pete Black, Wayne Sellars and Jim Dionne. Back row: Manager Bernie Rice, Skip Kinney, Mike Giles, John Stubbs, Mike Blanchard, John Rice, Mike Nelson and coach Gus Moore.
Bangor Daily News Photo by Jack Loftus
The State of Maine Little League Champions from Bangor's West Side lost in the first round of the New England Regionals by a score of 10-2 to Barre, Vermont's entry. The West Siders compiled an outstanding record on their way to the top and the Maine championship. Front row, left to right: Roger Tracy, Peter McEvoy, Mike McNamera, Jim Young, Gene Weltz, Pete Black, Wayne Sellars and Jim Dionne. Back row: Manager Bernie Rice, Skip Kinney, Mike Giles, John Stubbs, Mike Blanchard, John Rice, Mike Nelson and coach Gus Moore.
Posted Aug. 30, 2011, at 8:09 p.m.
Last modified Aug. 30, 2011, at 9:36 p.m.

10 years ago — Sept. 1, 2001

(As reported in the Bangor Daily News)

ORONO — It’s not only the freshmen who are wandering around the University of Maine’s Memorial Union this weekend looking a little lost.

Try this. Go in the entrance to what used to be the Bear’s Den on the lower level, follow the gray-tiled floor down the hall, around the corner and into the bright hallway outside the bookstore, one of the main components of a $12.5 million addition to the union. It’s also the first major section to be completed, with several other parts of the project still under construction.

Upperclassmen, faculty and staff are just as likely to be wearing puzzled expressions and asking directions to the bookstore. The new bookstore is well laid out for retail purposes.

25 years ago — Sept. 1, 1986

DIXMONT — Allen Brewster of Dixmont has a theory about raising attractive vegetables without the use of insecticides. it is not the kind of theory you might come upon in a horticultural journal — it doesn’t sound very scientific and it seems to make practical sense.

Call it Brewster’s Good Bug-Bad Bug theory. Right or wrong, Brewster grows beautiful vegetables for sale in Dixmont — Ace peppers, Detroit beets, Pontiac red potatoes and Kennebec whites; Stuttgart onions and Bermudas and Spanish red; corn named Harmony, Sprite, Sweet Sal, Early V and How Sweet It Is. The seeds, which he buys in Maine, are from hardy stock that do well in short growing seasons.

Brewster is almost 76 years old, a retiree 10 years ago from GTE.

BREWER — The class of 1936 of Brewer High School held its 50th class reunion on Aug. 19 at the Black Knight Restaurant. More than 80 classmates attending renewed old friendships at a social hour. The invocation was given by Leonard Clough.

John Gormely, class president, was master of ceremonies. Letters were read by Pat Smith Grant from four class members unable to attend: Phil Weart, William Laliberte, Harriat Clark and Valerie McKenna. Songs were sung with Betty Sprague of the class of 1941 playing the piano.

50 years ago — Sept. 1, 1961

BANGOR — The Bangor and Aroostook Railroad was notified by the Maine Public Utilities Commission that it can eliminate its passenger service Sept. 5. This will be the end of virtually all railroad passenger service in Maine.

BANGOR — John E. McKay will become associated with the law firm of Eaton, Peabody, Bradford and Veague, it was announced recently.

Mr. McKay was born in Bangor, the son of Mr. and Mrs E.L. McKay of 85 Maple St. He graduated from the University of Maine in 1954 and from Boston University School of Law in 1959. He resides at 637 Ohio St. with his wife, the former Beverly Stearns of Boston.

Members of the firm which Mr. McKay has just become associated with are George F. Peabody, Merrill R. Bradford, Arnold L. Veague, Malcolm E. Morrell Jr., John W. Conti and Robert J. Eaton.

BANGOR — Nearly 800 men from eastern and northern Maine who are members of the Maine Army National Guard will leave the area for two weeks of field training at Camp Drum, Watertown, N.Y. Before leaving, a group of the 262nd Engineer Battalion sorted rations to be assigned to the various companies for use on the long trek to Camp Drum. Working at the Bangor Armory were Maj. Homer Kelley, Spec. 5 Royce Day, Sgt. Roland Ouellette, Spec. 5 Horace Moffatt, Spec. 5 Elmer Rockwell and Tech. Sgt. Joseph Deroche.

BANGOR — Dennis Metro, son of Mr. and Mrs. Pero Metro, of 16 Sanford St., was awarded a two-year scholarship to the Pittsburgh Playhouse, Carnegie Technical Institute, Pittsburgh, where he will major in theater arts, costume and scenic design. He is a graduate of John Bapst High School and this past year attended the Vesper George School of Art in Boston. He is the former president of the Bangor Figure Skating Club and directed several ice shows in Maine.

100 years ago — Sept. 1, 1911

EAST EDDINGTON — Miss Neota Johnson is home from Mackany’s where she has been teaching a term of summer school.

Mrs. A.R. Aldrich of Springfield, Mass., a celebrated lecturer on physical culture and kindergarten work, gave a talk on the science of proper breathing at the home of Mrs. Clarence Johnson.

The result of the ball game played by the Bradley and East Eddington teams on the home ground resulted in the score of 12 to 1 in favor of East Eddington.

STETSON — Hazel Burke visited in Bangor and Old Town recently. While she was away she enjoyed a camping trip with a party in Onawa.

G.C. Demerritt recently purchased a new motor truck.

ORONO — The Commons of the University of Maine, which is being remodeled, and when completed will be used for the English department, will be named Estabrooke Hall in honor of the late professor H.M. Estabrooke, who for many years was the head of that department.

ORRINGTON — If one may judge by the number of entries in the Baby Show, there is little danger that the human race will come to nothing in Orrington. They formed a happy, cooing bunch of bouncing boys and girls and the judges found it a hard job to decide which was the best. After much deliberation, Sarah Ella Norwood, 5 months, was given the girl’s prize and George Albert Wiswell, 9 months, earned the prize for the best boy.

COMPILED BY ARDEANA HAMLIN

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