Deceased Glenburn councilor remembered at council meeting

Posted Aug. 25, 2011, at 10:14 p.m.

GLENBURN, Maine – The four remaining town councilors held a moment of silence at Thursday night’s council meeting for Councilor Kevin Paschal, 49, who died Wednesday after a long battle with illness, according to his obituary.

Paschal served as a councilor in Glenburn for 13 years. He was a member of the Penobscot County budget committee for 10 years.

“We’d like to send our condolences to Kevin’s family and friends,” said Michael O’Connor, council chairman. The other councilors, looking down at the desk, nodded their heads.

Paschal had been hospitalized in the past month for a heart operation, according to O’Connor.

“Kevin devoted his life to this town,” said Town Manager Michael Crooker.

In addition to serving on the council in the town he grew up in, Paschal also was active in community service and worked as a dispatcher at the Fire Department, where he got to know many residents by distributing 1,500 to 2,000 fire permits per year.

“He had a great knack for having his finger on what people in town were feeling and what their concerns were,” O’Connor said.

Also at the meeting, the council decided it likely will open Lakeside Landing to the public. In the past, Glenburn residents had to pay a $10 permit fee per vehicle and people from out of town had to pay $30 to have access.

Lakeside Landing is a town-owned park and beach on Pushaw Lake that features a slide on a float, a boat launch and horseshoe pits.

Residents have complained about vehicles parked at the landing without permits and people using the facilities without paying the fee.

Enforcing access to the park based on permits presents a problem, councilors said. There is no fence around the park and no gate at the entrance.

“We can’t afford to staff it, and we can’t afford to have law enforcement down there all the time,” Councilor Richard Cookson said.

The town collects between $500 and $1,000 annually from Lakeside Landing fees, an amount that the council felt could be met or exceeded in other ways if the permit fees were cut.

Councilors said a concession stand and “on-your-honor” donation box could bring in new funds and cutting out the hassle.

“Let everyone in the general area enjoy it,” Cookson said. It’s a beautiful spot.”

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