Farrah Fawcett’s son ordered to rehab in heroin case

Posted Aug. 24, 2011, at 6:51 p.m.

The son of Ryan O’Neal and the late Farrah Fawcett pleaded no contest Wednesday to heroin possession and was ordered to spend the next year in an intense inpatient rehab program.

Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Keith Schwartz also told Redmond O’Neal to serve five years on probation and gave him a three-year suspended prison sentence, which would only be imposed if the younger O’Neal gets into trouble again.

O’Neal, 26, also pleaded no contest to being a felon in possession of a firearm when he was arrested Aug. 2 after a traffic stop.

He entered the pleas without an agreement with prosecutors, district attorney’s spokeswoman Jane Robison said.

“The defense team appreciates that Judge Schwartz gave Redmond the help that he needs to turn his life around,” attorneys Richard Pintal and Michael Brewer said in a statement. “The court recognized that drug rehabilitation is the best thing for Redmond and society as a whole.”

Pintal said his client will be required to remain in a lockdown rehab facility and is facing a tough fight to beat his heroin addiction.

Mississippi: 1st black modern major-party nominee for governor

Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree on Tuesday became the first black candidate in modern times to win major-party nod for Mississippi governor in a state that hasn’t had a black statewide official since Reconstruction.

DuPree, 57, won a Democratic primary runoff and advances to the Nov. 8 general election to face Republican Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant, 56, of Brandon.

“I’m just so proud of the fact that we had people who believed in us, believed in the message, believed in what we’re trying to accomplish. I’m so proud that people took a hold of that,” DuPree said in a phone interview from a Hattiesburg community center, where he celebrated with family and supporters.

DuPree is the first black mayor of Hattiesburg, and is running a race-neutral campaign. In a 15-second commercial recently posted to his campaign website, DuPree looks directly into the camera and says: “I’m here to talk to you about color — green.”

DuPree holds up a $1 bill and continues: “Better jobs mean more money for Mississippians. And we do that with better schools and safer streets. More green means a better tomorrow.”

 

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