Study says more Maine wood can be harvested

A crane adds freshly cut timber to Wayne Daggett's payload at a harvesting area in Dover-Foxcroft in February. Daggett runs Charles Daggett Inc. based in Topsfield and hauls wood for private contractors.
A crane adds freshly cut timber to Wayne Daggett's payload at a harvesting area in Dover-Foxcroft in February. Daggett runs Charles Daggett Inc. based in Topsfield and hauls wood for private contractors.
Posted Aug. 21, 2011, at 9:54 a.m.

AUGUSTA, Maine — A new study says harvest levels of Maine’s spruce and fir trees can be increased significantly over the next 20 years while inventory levels remain steady.

The report by Old Town natural-resource consulting firm James W. Sewall Co. examines Maine’s private, state and commercial timberlands, excluding federal lands, amounting to slightly more than 17 million acres.

It predicts an opportunity over the next two decades to significantly increase harvest levels of spruce and fir while still maintaining current levels of total their standing inventory.

State officials say this means Maine’s forest products industry can play a significant role in a resurging national economy and in creating new jobs throughout Maine’s woodlands region.

The report was released by Gov. Paul LePage’s office Friday.

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