Man who put semen in water bottle ordered to pay $27,000

Posted Aug. 08, 2011, at 10:06 p.m.

SANTA ANA, Calif. — A California man convicted of ejaculating into a co-worker’s water bottle has been ordered to pay the woman more than $27,000.

The Los Angeles Times says a judge on Monday ordered Michael Kevin Lallana to pay the woman for loss of wages, therapy and medical expenses. Lallana was convicted earlier this year of two misdemeanor counts of battery.

Prosecutors say Lallana deposited his semen twice last year in the water bottle of a co-worker at Northwestern Mutual Mortgage Co. in Newport Beach.

The woman drank from the bottle both times, throwing the first one away after detecting a foul taste. The second time she sent the bottle to a lab for testing.

Lallana was arrested in July 2010 and his DNA was later matched to the water bottle.

Orange goo near remote Alaska village ID’d as eggs

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Scientists have identified an orange-colored gunk that appeared along the shore of a remote Alaska village as millions of microscopic eggs filled with fatty droplets.

But the mystery is not quite solved. Officials with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Monday they don’t know for sure what species the eggs are, although they believe they are some kind of crustacean eggs or embryos. They also don’t know if the eggs or if they are toxic, and that worries many of the 374 residents of Kivalina, an Inupiat Eskimo community located at the tip of an 8-mile barrier reef on Alaska’s northwest coast.

There’s been at least one report of dead minnows found in the lagoon of the village the night the eggs appeared last week. Residents also are worried about the community’s dwindling reserves in village water tanks even though the orange mass has dissipated from the lagoon and Wulik River, said city administrator Janet Mitchell.

“It seems to be all gone,” she said. “But if they’re microscopic eggs, who’s to say they’re not still in the river?”

Scientists also don’t know why the unidentified eggs suddenly emerged on the shores of Kivalina last week. Villagers say they’ve never seen such a phenomenon before.

“We’ll probably find some clues, but we’ll likely never have a definitive answer on that,” NOAA spokeswoman Julie Speegle said.

FBI: DNA test did not match D.B. Cooper suspect

OLYMPIA, Wash. — DNA testing has failed to link a new suspect in the D.B. Cooper hijacking to a necktie that he left behind on the plane in 1971, the FBI said Monday.

Special Agent Fred Gutt cautioned that the test does not necessarily rule out the deceased man because investigators do not know whether DNA on the tie is that of the hijacker. Gutt said there are three different DNA samples on the necktie and it’s not clear where the hijacker got it.

“There are some questions about the tie itself: Was it a used tie, a borrowed tie?” Gutt said.

Investigators compared the DNA on the tie to the DNA of someone in the new suspect’s family, Gutt said. A woman in Oklahoma recently came forward to say that she believes her uncle, Lynn Doyle Cooper, was the hijacker — which she based largely on memories from when she was 8 years old.

Gutt said the FBI had an inconclusive round of fingerprint testing on a guitar strap and that investigators are now working with family members to identify other items that could be tested further for fingerprints.

Federal investigators have checked hundreds of leads since the man dubbed “D.B. Cooper” parachuted from a flight with $200,000 dollars in ransom in 1971.

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