Newburgh Variety store closes its doors

The Newburgh Variety store, which recently lost its license to sell beer, wine and liquor, has closed. Delmer Terrill, who owns the 60-year-old store on routes 202 and 9, recently placed a sign on the store’s front door that read in part, “The events of the past three days have forced me to close forever.”
The Newburgh Variety store, which recently lost its license to sell beer, wine and liquor, has closed. Delmer Terrill, who owns the 60-year-old store on routes 202 and 9, recently placed a sign on the store’s front door that read in part, “The events of the past three days have forced me to close forever.”
Posted Aug. 02, 2011, at 5:23 p.m.
Last modified Aug. 02, 2011, at 8:23 p.m.
The exterior sign for Newburgh Variety on 2213 Western Ave. in Newburgh last month. The store, which recently lost its license to sell beer, wine and liquor, has closed. Delmer Terrill, who owns the 60-year-old store on routes 202 and 9, recently placed a sign on the store’s front door that read in part, “The events of the past three days have forced me to close forever.”
The exterior sign for Newburgh Variety on 2213 Western Ave. in Newburgh last month. The store, which recently lost its license to sell beer, wine and liquor, has closed. Delmer Terrill, who owns the 60-year-old store on routes 202 and 9, recently placed a sign on the store’s front door that read in part, “The events of the past three days have forced me to close forever.”

NEWBURGH, Maine — The Newburgh Variety store, which recently lost its license to sell beer, wine and liquor, has apparently closed.

Delmer Terrill, who owns the 60-year-old store on routes 202 and 9, recently placed a sign on the store’s front door that read in part, “The events of the past three days have forced me to close forever.”

The sign also thanked customers for their business over the years.

A family dispute between Terrill and daughter Amanda Batchelder had led to the loss of the store’s liquor license, according to a story published in the Bangor Daily News last week.

When he was reached at the store on Tuesday afternoon, Terrill had no comment. Attempts to contact Batchelder were unsuccessful.

According to Lt. David Bowler, a member of the special investigations unit of the Maine State Police, Batchelder surrendered her liquor licenses.

The store’s new manager said last week she was worried about how the business would survive without its liquor license, as half of the store’s business had come from the sales of beer, wine and liquor.

The new manager, Karen Dormida-Sibley of Newburgh, had been in the process of reapplying for a beer and wine license, which costs $200 per year, while an agency liquor store license costs $2,000 in the first year and $300 a year after that.

Due to Newburgh’s population of less than 2,000 people, the town is eligible for only one agency liquor license.

Liquor licenses typically take up to a year to obtain, and it’s rare for one to be given up for any reason, Bowler said. It usually only occurs when a store closes or the owners retire, he said.

BDN writer Christopher Cousins contributed to this report.

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