Traveling with pets? Brush up

Posted June 28, 2011, at 3:02 p.m.

Do your vacation plans involve family pets?

As vacation plans kick into high gear and travelers opt for the open air, lakes and woods for their holidays, it’s a good time to review plans for the family pet(s) that may be tagging along.

Progressive has the following tips for pet owners who have plans on taking their four-legged family members with them.

1.        Know your campground’s pet policy. Most campgrounds and RV parks have pet restrictions. They might charge extra for pets or have leash rules or designated areas for dog walking. To avoid any unwanted surprises, check your destination’s guidelines before you leave for the trip. Also, you can request a campsite that is a little more remote, so your pet won’t bother other campers who might not be animal lovers.

2.       Be prepared. Your pet’s tags should be up-to-date and include your cell phone number (remember, you’re on the road). Before you leave, you also may want to visit the veterinarian. If your pet usually gets carsick or restless when traveling, the vet may be able to suggest medications or other treatments that could help. You might also want to keep a copy of the Pet E.R. Guide on hand so that you can always find the closest 24-hour animal hospital.

3.       Pack a pet travel tote. It should include cleanup supplies, a travel bed, food and water, portable bowls, any medications, a pet first-aid kit and lots of toys to keep your pet busy and well behaved. Also, some RV parks require proof of rabies vaccination, so bring that along, too.

4.       Help them get their sea legs. Gradually introduce your pets to your boat and the water. Give your pets a chance to explore their surroundings while the boat is docked. Turn on the engine so they get accustomed to its sound, smell, and feel. Take short cruises and gradually build up to longer trips. Also, fit your pets with a personal flotation device, or life jacket. Find one with a lifting handle to make it easy and safe to lift your pets from the water. Give them time on land to get used to wearing it.

5.       Check your insurance. See if your insurance covers your pet. Progressive protects dogs and cats up to $1,000 if they’re hurt when you’re in an accident or in the event of a loss such as a theft or fire. The coverage is free to RV, boat and auto customers with Collision insurance.

 

http://bangordailynews.com/2011/06/28/outdoors/traveling-with-pets-brush-up/ printed on December 19, 2014