Boston’s Pedroia has bone bruise on right kneecap

Posted June 09, 2011, at 5:23 p.m.
Last modified June 09, 2011, at 11:34 p.m.

NEW YORK — Boston Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia has a bone bruise on his right kneecap and was out of action for Thursday night’s game at Yankee Stadium.

Pedroia was examined in Boston by team doctor Thomas Gill. The 2008 AL MVP has been bothered by a sore knee and left the team after playing in Wednesday night’s 11-6 win over New York. Manager Terry Francona had said he expected Pedroia would play Friday night at Toronto.

Red Sox shortstop Jed Lowrie returned to the lineup for the first time since Sunday. He’d been sidelined by a sore left shoulder.

Manager Terry Francona also said catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia spent the night in the hospital after feeling ill. Francona said Saltalamacchia would be available to play in an emergency in the series finale against the Yankees.

That game didn’t begin until 10:30 p.m. because of rain delay.

It was the latest piece of bad news for the Red Sox on a painful day. Boston reliever Bobby Jenks was placed on the 15-day disabled list again Wednesday with tightness in his back.

Jenks left Tuesday night’s game against the New York Yankees after throwing only four pitches in the seventh inning and said it was a flare-up of an injury he had early in his career, though he didn’t think he would be sidelined long.

The righthander had an MRI exam Wednesday and Boston put him on the DL before the 7:05 p.m. game.

Jenks was on the disabled list from May 2-30, missing 27 games with a strained right biceps. Since being activated, he had put together four scoreless outings.

The former White Sox closer has struggled in his first season with Boston, going 2-2 with a 6.57 ERA in 15 appearances. He has 11 walks and 14 strikeouts in 12 1-3 innings, and opponents are batting .340 against him.

Jenks signed a $12 million, two-year contract in the offseason to be Jonathan Papelbon’s setup man.

Boston recalled catcher Luis Exposito from Triple-A Pawtucket to provide insurance behind the plate. Saltalamacchia began feeling ill Wednesday and was sent to the hospital to make sure he has nothing more than the flu, Francona said.

“They ruled out anything besides intestinal turmoil, which is good news,” Francona said after his team’s 11-6 victory over the Yankees. “He might have had food poisoning. He was just good, old-fashioned sick.”

Jason Varitek started behind the plate, teamed with knuckleballer Tim Wakefield for the first time since 2005. Varitek has caught Wakefield in relief outings during that span, but the Red Sox captain had not started a game with Wakefield on the mound in six years.

Marco Scutaro started at shortstop Wednesday for the second consecutive game. Scutaro was activated from the disabled list Tuesday after missing 26 games with a strained muscle on his left side.

Francona also said lefthander Franklin Morales “did really well” in a 35-pitch side session Monday and was slated to throw again Wednesday. He could start a minor league rehab assignment soon.

Morales, acquired last month from Colorado, is on the DL with a strained left forearm.

MLB NOTEBOOK: Yankees reliever Joba Chamberlain has a torn ligament in his right elbow, a startling injury that’s likely to require Tommy John surgery and end his season. A test Thursday morning revealed the tear. It came a day after New York put Chamberlain on the 15-day disabled list with a stiff elbow, the latest setback for the back of the Yankees’ bullpen. But Chamberlain and the Yankees said they had no idea the injury was so severe when he went for the additional checkup. Chamberlain said he was “kind of in shock” and shed a few tears at the diagnosis, and said he didn’t know how or when he hurt himself. “I know I can get surgery and get it fixed,” he said. The Yankees said they would send reports on Chamberlain to noted orthopedist Dr. James Andrews. Chamberlain, Andrews and the Yankees plan to discuss the condition before deciding on a course of action.

While Chamberlain spoke on the Yankees bench before Thursday night’s game against Boston, his father sat in his wheelchair outside the New York dugout. Harlan Chamberlain said it was “kind of a foregone conclusion” his son would need Tommy John surgery, in which a ligament is reconstructed in an elbow. The recovery time is usually listed as 12 to 18 months, though Harlan Chamberlain said he thought it could be 8 to 9 months for a reliever. “He’s done for the season,” his dad said. “Now that he’s facing what every pitcher doesn’t want to face, he’s going to face it with a positive attitude. Let’s get it done.” Said Yankees manager Joe Girardi: “My guess is he’s going to have to have the surgery.” The 25-year-old Chamberlain is 2-0 with a 2.83 ERA in 27 games. The hard-throwing righty has been a key member of the Yankees’ staff for several years, and has pitched in a variety of roles.

 

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