PHOTOS

Planting American chestnut seedlings in Bangor

Glen Rea (right) of Bangor, chairman of The American Chestnut Association, and Bangor city forester Brian Dugas, shovel topsoil around one of two newly planted 1-year-old Chestnut saplings in a clearing off the Loop Road in the Rolland F. Perry City Forest on Friday afternoon, June 3, 2011. The plantings are part of an national effort to re-introduce the American Chestnut in the U.S after a 100-year-old chestnut blight nearly wiped away the native American tree. The trees are a gift from The Maine Chapter of the The American Chestnut Foundation to the city of Bangor and are the culmination of 26 years of backcross breeding and approximately $30 million in research costs. According to fellow TACF board member Ann Rea, 250 old growth chestnut trees have been found in Maine — from the New Hampshire border and as far north as Milo. In seven years these young trees should start to seed, the group said.
Glen Rea (right) of Bangor, chairman of The American Chestnut Association, and Bangor city forester Brian Dugas, shovel topsoil around one of two newly planted 1-year-old Chestnut saplings in a clearing off the Loop Road in the Rolland F. Perry City Forest on Friday afternoon, June 3, 2011. The plantings are part of an national effort to re-introduce the American Chestnut in the U.S after a 100-year-old chestnut blight nearly wiped away the native American tree. The trees are a gift from The Maine Chapter of the The American Chestnut Foundation to the city of Bangor and are the culmination of 26 years of backcross breeding and approximately $30 million in research costs. According to fellow TACF board member Ann Rea, 250 old growth chestnut trees have been found in Maine — from the New Hampshire border and as far north as Milo. In seven years these young trees should start to seed, the group said.
Posted June 03, 2011, at 10:56 p.m.
Glen Rea (left) of Bangor, chairman of The American Chestnut Association, and Bangor city forester Brian Dugas, use a tarp to move topsoil near one of two newly planted 1-year-old Chestnut saplings in a clearing off the Loop Road in the Rolland F. Perry City Forest on Friday afternoon, June 3, 2011. The plantings are part of an national effort to re-introduce the American Chestnut in the U.S after a 100-year-old chestnut blight nearly wiped away the native American tree. The trees are a gift from The Maine Chapter of the The American Chestnut Foundation to the city of Bangor and are the culmination of 26 years of backcross breeding and approximately $30 million in research costs. According to fellow TACF board member Ann Rea, 250 old growth chestnut trees have been found in Maine — from the New Hampshire border and as far north as Milo. In seven years these young trees should start to seed, the group said.
Glen Rea (left) of Bangor, chairman of The American Chestnut Association, and Bangor city forester Brian Dugas, use a tarp to move topsoil near one of two newly planted 1-year-old Chestnut saplings in a clearing off the Loop Road in the Rolland F. Perry City Forest on Friday afternoon, June 3, 2011. The plantings are part of an national effort to re-introduce the American Chestnut in the U.S after a 100-year-old chestnut blight nearly wiped away the native American tree. The trees are a gift from The Maine Chapter of the The American Chestnut Foundation to the city of Bangor and are the culmination of 26 years of backcross breeding and approximately $30 million in research costs. According to fellow TACF board member Ann Rea, 250 old growth chestnut trees have been found in Maine — from the New Hampshire border and as far north as Milo. In seven years these young trees should start to seed, the group said.
Bucky Owen (left) and Ann Rea (in background) watch fellow board member Glen Rea, chairman of The American Chestnut Association, pour water onto one of two newly planted 1-year-old Chestnut saplings in a clearing off the Loop Road in the Rolland F. Perry City Forest on Friday afternoon, June 3, 2011.
Bucky Owen (left) and Ann Rea (in background) watch fellow board member Glen Rea, chairman of The American Chestnut Association, pour water onto one of two newly planted 1-year-old Chestnut saplings in a clearing off the Loop Road in the Rolland F. Perry City Forest on Friday afternoon, June 3, 2011.

Glen Rea (right) of Bangor, chairman of The American Chestnut Association, and Bangor city forester Brian Dugas, shovel topsoil around one of two newly planted 1-year-old Chestnut saplings in a clearing off the Loop Road in the Rolland F. Perry City Forest on Friday afternoon, June 3, 2011. The plantings are part of an national effort to re-introduce the American chestnut in the U.S after a 100-year-old chestnut blight nearly wiped away the native American tree. The trees are a gift from The Maine Chapter of the The American Chestnut Foundation to the city of Bangor and are the culmination of 26 years of backcross breeding and approximately $30 million in research costs. According to fellow TACF board member Ann Rea, 250 old growth chestnut trees have been found in Maine — from the New Hampshire border and as far north as Milo. In seven years these young trees should start to seed, the group said.

SEE COMMENTS →

ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business
ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business

Similar Articles

More in Bangor