After Combat, the Unexpected Perils of Coming Home

Posted May 29, 2011, at 10:35 a.m.

The New York Times reports on the serious challenges of returning to civilian life after deployment to a war zone.

“For a year, they had navigated minefields and ducked bullets, endured tedium inside barbed-wired outposts and stitched together the frayed seams of long-distance relationships. One would think that going home would be the easiest thing troops could do.

But it is not so simple. The final weeks in a war zone are often the most dangerous, as weary troops get sloppy or unfocused. Once they arrive home, alcohol abuse, traffic accidents and other measures of mayhem typically rise as they blow off steam.

Weeks later, as the joy of return subsides, deep-seated emotional or psychological problems can begin to show. The sleeplessness, anxiety and irritability of post-traumatic stress disorder, for instance, often take months to emerge as combat veterans confront the tensions of home and the recurring memories of war.”

Read the full story here.

http://bangordailynews.com/2011/05/29/health/after-combat-the-unexpected-perils-of-coming-home/ printed on October 1, 2014