Convenience store raises $750 for Lincoln animal shelter

Why Not Stop? store clerks Nicole Lindberg of Lincoln and Eric Stinson of Kingman man registers at the Lincoln convenience store on Thursday afternoon. The store donated $750 to the Penobscot Valley Humane Society Shelter of Lincoln earlier this week as part of a month-long fundraiser.
Why Not Stop? store clerks Nicole Lindberg of Lincoln and Eric Stinson of Kingman man registers at the Lincoln convenience store on Thursday afternoon. The store donated $750 to the Penobscot Valley Humane Society Shelter of Lincoln earlier this week as part of a month-long fundraiser.
Posted May 13, 2011, at 7:17 p.m.
Last modified May 14, 2011, at 1:58 p.m.
A black Labrador retriever and a golden retriever who are among the six dogs rescued from an Enfield home by state officials were resting comfortably in the Penobscot Valley Humane Society in March 2010.
A black Labrador retriever and a golden retriever who are among the six dogs rescued from an Enfield home by state officials were resting comfortably in the Penobscot Valley Humane Society in March 2010.
Two of four female dogs rescued from an Enfield home in March 2010 rest comfortably at the Penobscot Valley Humane Society shelter in Lincoln after getting baths.
Two of four female dogs rescued from an Enfield home in March 2010 rest comfortably at the Penobscot Valley Humane Society shelter in Lincoln after getting baths.

LINCOLN, Maine ? A West Broadway convenience store donated $750 to the Penobscot Valley Humane Society shelter earlier this week in culmination of a monthlong fundraiser it began April 1, store owner Alan Grant said Friday.

Grant estimated that 30 percent of the store’s customers, minus its commercial clients ? truckers and others who buy gasoline and other supplies in bulk ? participated in the store’s Paws for Gas program.

“Everybody was thrilled about it. It was a very positive response,” Grant said Friday. “The humane society was thrilled. We are going to try to do it again. We will definitely do something with the humane society.”

Grant and his wife, Jamie, donated 3 cents for every gallon of gasoline they sold in April if customers told store clerks that they wanted to help “Paws for Gas” during checkout inside the store.

The Grants have a soft spot for animals and wanted to help the Park Avenue shelter pay its expenses while also tacitly encouraging other local businesses to support region charities. They also felt that having customers trigger the donations with a few spoken words might help the customers feel a little better about having to pay rising gasoline prices, Grant said.

That might have been the plan, but it took awhile before customers caught on, store clerk Nicole Lindberg said. Some customers initially suspected that the fundraiser would cost them money and only eventually realized that it didn’t. Once word got around through Facebook and other media about the program, customer response was strong, she said.

“There were a lot of people who purposely stopped here just to participate,” Lindberg said.

Meg Crocker-Curtis, the shelter’s manager, did not immediately return a telephone message on Friday. A worker who answered the phone at the shelter said he didn’t know how the donation would be used.

When the fundraiser was launched, the shelter needed more cages, animal food, blankets, bleach and paper towels. More funding for its spay and neutering program and to finish its 20-by-44-foot addition also would be welcome, Crocker-Curtis has said.

The shelter is the primary animal control and humane shelter for Lincoln and serves several dozen animals at a time. It is often the first stop in the Lincoln Lakes region for animals that have been severely neglected or abused.

Anyone interested in donating to the shelter, acquiring a pet or doing shelter volunteer work may call 794-3457 or mail checks or money orders to P.O. Box 73, Lincoln 04457.

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