Curran spring egg festival Saturday

Breah Curtis of Newburgh retrieves an Easter egg that fell from her bag as she and her big sister Molly Curtis, 3 and her mom Amy Curtis (both not pictured) listened to Bangor musician and Curran Homestead board member Jerry Hughes (in background) play old time favorites on his keyboard at the Curran Homestead in March 2010.
Breah Curtis of Newburgh retrieves an Easter egg that fell from her bag as she and her big sister Molly Curtis, 3 and her mom Amy Curtis (both not pictured) listened to Bangor musician and Curran Homestead board member Jerry Hughes (in background) play old time favorites on his keyboard at the Curran Homestead in March 2010.
Posted April 12, 2011, at 8:27 p.m.
Last modified April 12, 2011, at 8:57 p.m.
Breah Curtis of Newburgh grabs a plastic Easter egg from her big sister Molly Curtis (left), as they and their mom Amy Curtis (not pictured) listened to Bangor musician and Curran Homestead board member Jerry Hughes (in background) play old time favorites on his keyboard at the Curran Homestead in March 2010.
Breah Curtis of Newburgh grabs a plastic Easter egg from her big sister Molly Curtis (left), as they and their mom Amy Curtis (not pictured) listened to Bangor musician and Curran Homestead board member Jerry Hughes (in background) play old time favorites on his keyboard at the Curran Homestead in March 2010.

ORRINGTON, Maine — The Curran Homestead Living History Farm & Museum is hosting its annual Easter Egg Hunt & Spring Festival 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday at the historic farm on Fields Pond Road.

“Hop on over, meet the Easter Bunny, find the hidden eggs as you discover the various array of family farm equipment generously donated by many area families,” John Mugnai, Curran president, said in a press release.

In addition to hunting for eggs, folks can pump water from the well, go into the barn and visit with baby goats and chicks, and venture to the blacksmith shop where Dwight King will be demonstrating blacksmithing.

The circa-1890s Curran Homestead was a subsistence farm that utilized crops, animals and local resources, such as ice from the pond, to provide food, shelter and cash for the Curran family.

The Homestead Living History Farm & Museum was created 20 years ago to preserve the farm, which provides visitors a glimpse into the area’s past.

Bruce Bowden, vice president and museum director, will provide barn tours on Saturday, Jim Leighton will gives rides in his Model-T, if weather permits, and Jerry Hughes will provide live music.

As a special treat, Zach Fields, magician and artist, will demonstrate his skills between 11 a.m.-noon in the barnyard.

Lunch consists of homemade corn chowder, and there will be cookies and cupcakes for the kids of all ages to decorate then eat.

Admission, which includes all activities and refreshments, for members is $5 for adults, $3 for children under 12, with a maximum of $16 per family. For nonmembers the cost is $7 for adults, $5 for children under 12, with a maximum of $24 per family.

Those who would like more information, can go to the farm’s website, curranhomestead.org or call 745 4426.

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