Race for Cure likely to draw large crowd

Breast cancer survivors wave to the thousands of people who gathered for the 13th annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure during the survivor ceremony on the Bangor Waterfront on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2009.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY GABOR DEGRE)

CAPTION

Breast cancer survivors wave to the thousads of people who gathered for the 13th annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure during the survivor ceremony at the Bangor Waterfront Saturday.   (Bangor Daily news/Gabor Degre)
BDN
Breast cancer survivors wave to the thousands of people who gathered for the 13th annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure during the survivor ceremony on the Bangor Waterfront on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2009. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY GABOR DEGRE) CAPTION Breast cancer survivors wave to the thousads of people who gathered for the 13th annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure during the survivor ceremony at the Bangor Waterfront Saturday. (Bangor Daily news/Gabor Degre)
Posted Sept. 15, 2010, at 11:10 p.m.
Participants run and walk the course during the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in Bangor on Sunday morning, Sept. 20, 2009. Many participated in the 5K and 1K race-walks in honor of survivors and in memory of friends or relatives who have died of breast cancer. The 13th annual event drew more than 5,000 participants and raised more than $300,000. Since 1982 the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure organization has grown to a worldwide network that has invested more than $1.3 billion in breast cancer research.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY GABOR DEGRE)

CAPTION

Thousants of people ran and walked the 5k and 1k distances during the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in Bangor Sunday morning, Sept. 20, 2009.  Many participated in honor of survivors and in memory of friends or relatives who died of breast cancer. The 13th annual event drew over 5000 participants and raised over $300.000.  Since 1982 the Susan G. Komen for the Cure organization grew to a world-wide network that invested over $1.3 billion in breast cancer research. (Bangor Daily news/Gabor Degre)
BDN
Participants run and walk the course during the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in Bangor on Sunday morning, Sept. 20, 2009. Many participated in the 5K and 1K race-walks in honor of survivors and in memory of friends or relatives who have died of breast cancer. The 13th annual event drew more than 5,000 participants and raised more than $300,000. Since 1982 the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure organization has grown to a worldwide network that has invested more than $1.3 billion in breast cancer research. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY GABOR DEGRE) CAPTION Thousants of people ran and walked the 5k and 1k distances during the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in Bangor Sunday morning, Sept. 20, 2009. Many participated in honor of survivors and in memory of friends or relatives who died of breast cancer. The 13th annual event drew over 5000 participants and raised over $300.000. Since 1982 the Susan G. Komen for the Cure organization grew to a world-wide network that invested over $1.3 billion in breast cancer research. (Bangor Daily news/Gabor Degre)

BANGOR, Maine — If the previous 13 years are any indication, about 5,000 people Sunday will participate in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure.

The large number of participants in the event will force some streets between the Bangor Waterfront and the Bangor Civic Center and Auditorium on Main Street to close temporarily.

Front and Railroad streets in the waterfront area will be closed from 6 a.m. until about 2 p.m. Sunday, according to Bangor police. Summer, May, Lincoln and Buck streets, along with the block of Webster Avenue between Lincoln and Buck streets, will be closed between 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. during the race.

Bangor police urged travelers coming from Winterport and Hampden to downtown Bangor for nonrace activities to take Interstate 395 to the South Main Street exit in Brewer, then travel north to the Joshua Chamberlain or Railroad bridges to cross the Penobscot River and reach the city.

Nearly 3,000 runners had registered for the race as of early Wednesday afternoon, according to Executive Director Sally Bilancia.

“We’ve had phenomenal growth over the last few years,” she said.

This past Sunday was the first year that a Komen race was held in Portland, where 1,300 people participated and $125,000 was raised, Bilancia said Wednesday.

The Bangor race, now in its 14th year, is an event that caters to serious runners and those who simply want to raise money for a good cause.

“It’s hard to find someone who is not affected by breast cancer,” she said. “This really is a great experience for people to come together and an opportunity to celebrate survivorship.”

Runners may register online until Friday but also may sign up Sunday before the race from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.

“Although we are proud of our success, the need is greater than ever,” Bilancia said in a press release issued last month. “The people of Maine are known for coming together in a time of crisis, and the majority of the money we raise will fund much-needed assistance for the uninsured in Maine.”

To date, the Komen Maine affiliate has invested nearly $1.8 million in state education, screening and treatment programs, as well as more than $500,000 to breast cancer research through the Susan G. Komen for the Cure grants program, according to information on its website. Nearly $500,000 has returned to Maine in the form of research grants through that program.

On the Web: www.komenmaine.org

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