Last three defendants in Lee-Lincoln cocaine ring sentenced

Posted Sept. 10, 2010, at 6:20 p.m.
Last modified Jan. 30, 2011, at 11:33 a.m.

PORTLAND, Maine — The last three defendants in a Lee-Lincoln cocaine distribution ring were sentenced Friday in U.S. District Court to federal prison for their roles in a drug operation that stretched from Costa Rica through the Bahamas to Florida and Maine.

Federal prosecutors have said the two dozen defendants in the drug conspiracy distributed more than 100 pounds of the drug in northern Penobscot County between Jan 1, 2002, and May 1, 2006.

Anita Whitehead, 42, and Fred Goslin, 49, both of Howland, pleaded guilty earlier this year to one count each of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute cocaine. Whitehead was sentenced Friday in U.S. District Court in Portland to 2½ years in prison. Goslin was sentenced to one year and three months in prison.

In addition, U.S. District Judge D. Brock Hornby sentenced Whitehead and Goslin, who lived together during the time of the conspiracy, to four years and three years of supervised release, respectively, after they have completed their prison terms.

The couple waived indictment and pleaded guilty to the federal charges in February. Both admitted that they bought and sold cocaine from other defendants who lived in the Lee and Lincoln areas.

The third person sentenced Friday was Christopher Smith, 44, of Jupiter, Fla. Hornby sentenced Smith to 9½ years in prison and five years of supervised release. Smith, who pleaded guilty in May to conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute controlled substances, also was ordered to forfeit $150,000.

By pleading guilty, Smith admitted that he made between five trips between Grand Bahama Island and the east coast of Florida for Michael Mayer, 56, of Jupiter, Fla., and Costa Rica. Mayer admitted being the mastermind behind the scheme, according to a report published earlier this year by the Bangor Daily News. Smith told investigators, according to court documents, that he brought between 1,100 and 1,320 pounds of cocaine into the U.S. for Mayer.

Just 110 pounds of it was distributed in Maine, Assistant U.S. Attorney Joel Casey, who prosecuted the case, said Friday after the sentencings. The federal prosecutor also said he did not know what happened to the rest of the cocaine Smith admitted importing for Mayer.

Mayer was sentenced earlier this year to 12½ years in federal prison and five years of supervised release. He pleaded guilty in June 2009 to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute controlled substances. He was indicted by a federal grand jury in November 2007. Mayer was arrested in Costa Rica sometime after that and extradited to Maine in October 2008.

The judge also ordered Mayer to forfeit $2.6 million, the amount the court found he profited from the operation, which he ran from Jan. 1, 2002, to June 1, 2005. Mayer also was ordered to forfeit four properties he owns in Costa Rica, three cars and a boat in Costa Rica, and a bank account at Banco National in his adopted country.

After an alleged dispute over money between Mayer and his buyers in Maine, Casey said in 2008, members of the drug ring obtained cocaine from June 2005 through November 2005 from Laurent “Larry” Provost, 62, of Woonsocket, R.I., who was living in Mansfield, Mass. The relationship between the Maine buyers and Provost ended after less than six months in a disagreement over money and the quality of the drugs, according to court documents.

The group then turned to two people from the Dominican Republic who were operating out of Lawrence, Mass. Prosecutors have not named them. They were arrested in New Hampshire on unrelated drug charges in January 2006 and are serving federal prison terms, Casey has said. Where the ring obtained drugs after that has not been made public.

Provost was sentenced in October to 2½ years in prison and three years of supervised release and was ordered to forfeit $100,000.

Others in the ring who have pleaded guilty and been sentenced are:

• Kenneth Kaczmarski, 43, Jupiter, Fla., 10 years in prison, five years supervised release, forfeiture of $878,500.

• Anthony Martin, 50, Lincoln, two years and nine months in prison, five years of supervised release.

• Lisa Delaurentiis, 43, Jupiter, Fla., three years in prison, three years supervised release, forfeiture of $240,000.

• Brent “Cowboy” Noyes, 57, Lincoln, 6½ years in prison, three years supervised release, forfeiture of $120,000.

• Richard “Rat” Russell, 49, Lincoln, 10 years in prison, eight years supervised release, forfeiture of $180,500.

• Troy Littlefield, 44, Oakfield, six years in prison, four years supervised release, forfeiture of $85,000.

• Jeffery Whitehead, 54, Enfield, five years and five months in prison, four years supervised release, forfeiture of $81,600.

• Jeffrey Polk, 36, Alaska, four years in prison, three years supervised release, forfeiture of $240,000.

• Daniel “Danny” Littlefield, 49, Lee, seven years and eight months in prison, five years supervised release, forfeiture of $593,000.

• Mark Russell, 41, Lincoln, one year and 10 months in prison, four years supervised release, forfeiture of $2.5 million.

• Donald “Donny” Russell, 50, Lincoln, four years in prison, three years supervised release, forfeiture of $523,000.

• Raymond Davis, 48, Lincoln and Jupiter, Fla., seven years in prison, five years supervised release, forfeiture of $624,000.

• Jeffrey “Bow Neck” Edwards, 42, Bradenton and Islamorada, Fla., four years in prison, three years supervised release, forfeiture of $270,000.

• Robert Donath, 28, Lincoln, 7½ years in prison, five years supervised release, forfeiture of $284,000.

• Peter Glidden, 31, Smithfield, seven years in prison, five years supervised release, forfeiture of $240,000.

• Preston Chubbuck, 43, Springfield, two years and one month in prison, three years supervised release, forfeiture of $25,000.

• Nancy Squegilia, 51, East Millinocket, two years and nine months in prison, three years supervised release, forfeiture of $11,600.

The Russells are brothers. The Littlefields are not related, according to Casey.

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