Children at festival construct dream city from boxes

MacKenzie Kirkbride (foreground), 10, of Greenville  and her friend MacKenzie Redimarker, right, 10 of Greenville put the finishing touches on their cardboard homes in the Children & Family Area of the American Folk Festival on Bangor's waterfront Saturday. They and scores of other children visited the Maine Discovery Museum's " We Built This City" area at the American Folk Festival this weekend to build a box city using recyclables. (Bangor Daily News/John Clarke Russ)
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MacKenzie Kirkbride (foreground), 10, of Greenville and her friend MacKenzie Redimarker, right, 10 of Greenville put the finishing touches on their cardboard homes in the Children & Family Area of the American Folk Festival on Bangor's waterfront Saturday. They and scores of other children visited the Maine Discovery Museum's " We Built This City" area at the American Folk Festival this weekend to build a box city using recyclables. (Bangor Daily News/John Clarke Russ)
Posted Aug. 28, 2010, at 6:31 p.m.
Abby Adamo, right,  5 of Winterport applies a generous amount of glue to her self-fashoined cardboard home which she was building for her stuffed animals--most of which are pigs, said her mom Cathy Adamo. She, Kalen Hixson, left, 4 and scores of other children visited the Maine Discovery Museum's " We Built This City" area at the American Folk Festival Saturday to build a box city using recyclables. (Bangor Daily News/John Clarke Russ)
BDN
Abby Adamo, right, 5 of Winterport applies a generous amount of glue to her self-fashoined cardboard home which she was building for her stuffed animals--most of which are pigs, said her mom Cathy Adamo. She, Kalen Hixson, left, 4 and scores of other children visited the Maine Discovery Museum's " We Built This City" area at the American Folk Festival Saturday to build a box city using recyclables. (Bangor Daily News/John Clarke Russ)

BANGOR — Mersadie Iver of Hamdpen on Saturday afternoon knelt in the grass next to the Estaban Gomez Memorial.

The 10-year-old girl carefully placed squares of silver paper with sticky backing on the outside of a box, which she had attached to a flat piece of cardboard. On that piece of cardboard, she had colored red and white stripes. Across the front of the box, Mersadie wrote in bright colors, “CANDY.”

“It’s a candy factory,” she said. “Every town should have one.”

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Mersadie and other children who Saturday visited the American Folk Festival began work on a box city. The event was planned and staffed by the Maine Discovery Museum.

“When we learned we were going to be in this new, larger space, we needed to thing about a new activ-ity,” Andrea Stark, executive director of the museum, said Saturday afternoon. “We came up with this idea of a box city. The idea is for them to build the city of their dreams and to put into it what they think should be in that city.”

The children’s area, located in Pickering Square at previous festivals, moved to Broad Street this year in the area where the Heritage Stage had been. That stage was eliminated this year due to the festival’s budget deficit from previous years.

After she finished constructing her factory, Mersadie placed it on it a piece of Masonite board under a tent. Near her factory were buildings made of boxes and other materials that resembled churches, schools, stores and houses.

In addition to the box city, children Saturday also made musical instruments out of round boxes and tubes.

Construction of the box city will continue Sunday. Children also will be able to make conductor ba-tons and animal kits, Stark said.

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