BDN staffers recognized by New England Associated Press

Posted Aug. 06, 2010, at 9:44 p.m.
TEST PILOT   Reginald Strout, 88, of Brewer releases a Jimmy Allen BA Cabin model airplane he built and was testing for competition as Bass Park racetrack in Bangor last week. Strout has built more than 100 models that are powered by rubber strips. &quotYou don't want to test them with full power. I give it between 400 and 800 turns to see how it does," Strout said. He travels out of state for competitions with other model airplane enthusiasts. &quotI think it is more interesting to fly one of these than the modern radio-controlled models," Strout said. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY GABOR DEGRE)



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Reginald Strout, 88, of Brewer releases a Jimmy Allen BA Cabin model airplane he built and was testing it for competition at the Bass Park race track in Bangor Thursday afternoon. Strout has built over 100 models all of wich are powered by srtips of rubber.  Stout has to wind the rubber strips to power the propeller and during the thest the model would fly about a minute.  &quotYou don't want to test them with full power.  I give it between 400 and 800 turns to see how it does.  It happend that I couldn't find models because they flew over a building or into the woods."  He travels to compete out of state where enthusiasts of similar models planes get together from all over New England and the U.S.  &quotI think it is more interesting to fly one of these then the modern radio-controlled models.  After you release it you never know exactly what it is going to do and you hope the wind is not going to change on you."   (Bangor Daily News/Gabor Degre)
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TEST PILOT Reginald Strout, 88, of Brewer releases a Jimmy Allen BA Cabin model airplane he built and was testing for competition as Bass Park racetrack in Bangor last week. Strout has built more than 100 models that are powered by rubber strips. "You don't want to test them with full power. I give it between 400 and 800 turns to see how it does," Strout said. He travels out of state for competitions with other model airplane enthusiasts. "I think it is more interesting to fly one of these than the modern radio-controlled models," Strout said. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY GABOR DEGRE) CAPTION Reginald Strout, 88, of Brewer releases a Jimmy Allen BA Cabin model airplane he built and was testing it for competition at the Bass Park race track in Bangor Thursday afternoon. Strout has built over 100 models all of wich are powered by srtips of rubber. Stout has to wind the rubber strips to power the propeller and during the thest the model would fly about a minute. "You don't want to test them with full power. I give it between 400 and 800 turns to see how it does. It happend that I couldn't find models because they flew over a building or into the woods." He travels to compete out of state where enthusiasts of similar models planes get together from all over New England and the U.S. "I think it is more interesting to fly one of these then the modern radio-controlled models. After you release it you never know exactly what it is going to do and you hope the wind is not going to change on you." (Bangor Daily News/Gabor Degre)
Jayne, a homeless woman, slumps on a log after her male companion, Norman, passed out while drinking at The Pines in Bangor on Thursday. The Pines is a wooded area near the I-95 Hammond Street exit that is frequented by homeless people who live in makeshift campsites. It is also the site where Stephen James killed a fellow homeless man, Clyde Worster, in May 2008.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY KEVIN BENNETT)



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A homeless woman slumps on a log after her male companion passed out while drinking at The Pines on Thursday, November 19, 2009. The Pines is a wooded area near the I-95 Hammond St. exit that is frequented by homeless people who live in make-shift campsites.  It is also the site where Stephen James killed a fellow homeless man, Clyde Worster,  in May of 2008. (Bangor Daily News/Kevin Bennett)
Jayne, a homeless woman, slumps on a log after her male companion, Norman, passed out while drinking at The Pines in Bangor on Thursday. The Pines is a wooded area near the I-95 Hammond Street exit that is frequented by homeless people who live in makeshift campsites. It is also the site where Stephen James killed a fellow homeless man, Clyde Worster, in May 2008. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY KEVIN BENNETT) CAPTION A homeless woman slumps on a log after her male companion passed out while drinking at The Pines on Thursday, November 19, 2009. The Pines is a wooded area near the I-95 Hammond St. exit that is frequented by homeless people who live in make-shift campsites. It is also the site where Stephen James killed a fellow homeless man, Clyde Worster, in May of 2008. (Bangor Daily News/Kevin Bennett)
After more than 13 hours on the water, New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (from left0, Candace Borutskie and Yan Guilbault prepare to tie up in Lubec after spendign the daylight hours in the Bay of Fundy studyign right whales Thursday.   (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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After more than 13 hours on the water, New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left), Candace Borutskie and Yan Guilbault prepare to tie up in Lubec after spending the daylight hours in the Bay of Fundy studying right whales Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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After more than 13 hours on the water, New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (from left0, Candace Borutskie and Yan Guilbault prepare to tie up in Lubec after spendign the daylight hours in the Bay of Fundy studyign right whales Thursday. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION After more than 13 hours on the water, New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left), Candace Borutskie and Yan Guilbault prepare to tie up in Lubec after spending the daylight hours in the Bay of Fundy studying right whales Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
North Atlantic right whales are identified from a distance by their V-shaped blows in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. Here, four adults participate in what scientists call a social active group.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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North Atlantic right whales are identified from a distance by their v-shaped blows in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. Here four adults participate in what scientists call a social active group. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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North Atlantic right whales are identified from a distance by their V-shaped blows in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. Here, four adults participate in what scientists call a social active group. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION North Atlantic right whales are identified from a distance by their v-shaped blows in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. Here four adults participate in what scientists call a social active group. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (from left), Yan Guilbault, Amy Knowlton and Jon Chunha watch for North Atlantic right whales and other marine life as they motor through the Bay of Fundy on Thursday.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (from left), Yan Guilbault, Amy Knowlton and Jon Cunha watch for North Atlantic right whales and other marine life as they motor through the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. The group saw more than 40 right whales along with humpbacks and finbacks, during their 13-hour excursion. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (from left), Yan Guilbault, Amy Knowlton and Jon Chunha watch for North Atlantic right whales and other marine life as they motor through the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (from left), Yan Guilbault, Amy Knowlton and Jon Cunha watch for North Atlantic right whales and other marine life as they motor through the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. The group saw more than 40 right whales along with humpbacks and finbacks, during their 13-hour excursion. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
New England Aquarium researchers board the Nereid in Lubec at dawn before departing for the Bay of Fundy to look for right whales Thursday. The researchers have been coming to Lubec for 30 years to do their work.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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New England Aquarium researchers board the Nereid in Lubec at dawn before departing for the Bay of Fundy to look for right whales Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. The researchers have been coming to Lubec for 30 years to do their work. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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New England Aquarium researchers board the Nereid in Lubec at dawn before departing for the Bay of Fundy to look for right whales Thursday. The researchers have been coming to Lubec for 30 years to do their work. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION New England Aquarium researchers board the Nereid in Lubec at dawn before departing for the Bay of Fundy to look for right whales Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. The researchers have been coming to Lubec for 30 years to do their work. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
They saw more then forty North Atlantic right whales in a 35-square-mile area of the bay, including this one near sunset. The species' future depends on the approximately 100 reproductively active femalses which this year birthed 39 calves. Two of those have already died due to ship strikes or entanglements.   (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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New England Aquarium researchers saw more than forty North Atlantic right whales in a 35 square mile area of the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009 including this one near sunset. The species' future depends on the approximately 100 reproductively active females which this year birthed 39 calves. Two of those however, have already died due to ship strikes or entanglements. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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They saw more then forty North Atlantic right whales in a 35-square-mile area of the bay, including this one near sunset. The species' future depends on the approximately 100 reproductively active femalses which this year birthed 39 calves. Two of those have already died due to ship strikes or entanglements. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION New England Aquarium researchers saw more than forty North Atlantic right whales in a 35 square mile area of the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009 including this one near sunset. The species' future depends on the approximately 100 reproductively active females which this year birthed 39 calves. Two of those however, have already died due to ship strikes or entanglements. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
A mother North Atlantic right whale and her calf move through the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan at dawn Thursday. The reproductively active females birthed 39 calves this year, according to researchers, the most on record.    (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) whales

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A mother North Atlantic right whale and her calf move through the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan (background) on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009 at dawn. The reproductively active females birthed 39 calves this year according to researchers, the most on record since 1980. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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A mother North Atlantic right whale and her calf move through the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan at dawn Thursday. The reproductively active females birthed 39 calves this year, according to researchers, the most on record. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) whales CAPTION A mother North Atlantic right whale and her calf move through the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan (background) on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009 at dawn. The reproductively active females birthed 39 calves this year according to researchers, the most on record since 1980. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
New England Aquarium researcher Yan Guilbault watches for North Atlantic right whales in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. Guilbault estimated the group saw more than 40 right whales. For each whale, he sketched the special markings, called callosity patterns, and any scars to help identify and track them.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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New England Aquarium researchers Yan Guilbault watches for North Atlantic right whales in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. Guilbault estimated the group saw more than 40 right whales, each of which he scetched the special markings called callosity patterns and any scars to help identify and track them. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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New England Aquarium researcher Yan Guilbault watches for North Atlantic right whales in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. Guilbault estimated the group saw more than 40 right whales. For each whale, he sketched the special markings, called callosity patterns, and any scars to help identify and track them. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION New England Aquarium researchers Yan Guilbault watches for North Atlantic right whales in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. Guilbault estimated the group saw more than 40 right whales, each of which he scetched the special markings called callosity patterns and any scars to help identify and track them. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
Research scientist Amy Knowlton records sightings of marine life in the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan at dawn Thursday. In the background is research assistant Candace vorutskie.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) whales

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New England Aquarium research scientist Amy Knowlton (center) records sightings of marine life in the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan (right) on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009 at dawn. Knowlton said that 75 percent of the North Atlantic right whale population have been entangled in their lifetime and about 10 to 15 percent are entangled each year. Besides reducing entanglement in fishing ropes and gear, whale researchers are trying to reduce the number of ship strikes which also threaten the population. In the background is research assistant Candace Borutskie. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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Research scientist Amy Knowlton records sightings of marine life in the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan at dawn Thursday. In the background is research assistant Candace vorutskie. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) whales CAPTION New England Aquarium research scientist Amy Knowlton (center) records sightings of marine life in the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan (right) on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009 at dawn. Knowlton said that 75 percent of the North Atlantic right whale population have been entangled in their lifetime and about 10 to 15 percent are entangled each year. Besides reducing entanglement in fishing ropes and gear, whale researchers are trying to reduce the number of ship strikes which also threaten the population. In the background is research assistant Candace Borutskie. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
A North Atlantic right whale shows its fluke as it dives in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. The whales grow up to 55 feet long and are thought to live 70 to 100 years.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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A North Atlantic right whale dives showing its fluke in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. The whales grow up to 55 feet long and are thought to live 70 to 100 years. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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A North Atlantic right whale shows its fluke as it dives in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. The whales grow up to 55 feet long and are thought to live 70 to 100 years. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION A North Atlantic right whale dives showing its fluke in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. The whales grow up to 55 feet long and are thought to live 70 to 100 years. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left) and Jon Cunha watch for North Atlantic right whales and other marine life as they conduct a survey in the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan (right) on Thursday at dawn. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, critically endangered right whales migrate each summer north on the Atlantic seaboard from their birthing area near the Florida or Georgia coast to the Bay of Fundy where they feed and socialize. Scientists from the aquarium have summered in Lubec for 30 years to conduct research on the species, which is thought to include less than 450 whales.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left) and Jon Cunha watch for North Atlantic right whales and other marine life as they conduct a survey in the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan (right) on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009 at dawn. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, the critically endangered right whale migrates each summer up the Atlantic seaboard from their birthing area near the Florida or Georgia coast, to the Bay of Fundy where they feed and socialize. Scientists from the aquarium have summered in Lubec for the past 30 years to conduct their research on the species which is thought to include less than 400 whales. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
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New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left) and Jon Cunha watch for North Atlantic right whales and other marine life as they conduct a survey in the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan (right) on Thursday at dawn. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, critically endangered right whales migrate each summer north on the Atlantic seaboard from their birthing area near the Florida or Georgia coast to the Bay of Fundy where they feed and socialize. Scientists from the aquarium have summered in Lubec for 30 years to conduct research on the species, which is thought to include less than 450 whales. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left) and Jon Cunha watch for North Atlantic right whales and other marine life as they conduct a survey in the Bay of Fundy near Grand Manan (right) on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009 at dawn. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, the critically endangered right whale migrates each summer up the Atlantic seaboard from their birthing area near the Florida or Georgia coast, to the Bay of Fundy where they feed and socialize. Scientists from the aquarium have summered in Lubec for the past 30 years to conduct their research on the species which is thought to include less than 400 whales. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left) and Amy Knwolton signal the presence  of right whales in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. The researchers arrived in Lubec on Aug. 3 and spent their eighth day on the water Thursday. When they see the whales, they travel closer to photograph them. The photos go to a collection of more than 200,000 images which date to 1935 and is the most complete right whale identification resource available, accoridng to the aquarium's Web site.  (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN)

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New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left) Amy Knowlton signal the presence of right whales in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. The researchers arrived Aug. 3 in Lubec and spent their eighth day on the water Thursday. When they see the whales, they travel closer to photograph them. The photos go into a collection of more than 200,000 images which date back to 1935 and is the most complete right whale identification resource available according to the aquarium's website. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)
BDN
New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left) and Amy Knwolton signal the presence of right whales in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday. The researchers arrived in Lubec on Aug. 3 and spent their eighth day on the water Thursday. When they see the whales, they travel closer to photograph them. The photos go to a collection of more than 200,000 images which date to 1935 and is the most complete right whale identification resource available, accoridng to the aquarium's Web site. (BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN) CAPTION New England Aquarium researchers Jessica Taylor (left) Amy Knowlton signal the presence of right whales in the Bay of Fundy on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2009. The researchers arrived Aug. 3 in Lubec and spent their eighth day on the water Thursday. When they see the whales, they travel closer to photograph them. The photos go into a collection of more than 200,000 images which date back to 1935 and is the most complete right whale identification resource available according to the aquarium's website. (Bangor Daily News/Bridget Brown)

The Bangor Daily News earned top honors in four categories in the New England Associated Press News Executives Association contest, it was announced Friday. The awards will be presented Sept. 10 at NEAPNEA’s fall conference at the Radisson Hotel & Suites in Chelmsford, Mass.

Honored with first-place selections were BDN photographers Kevin Bennett and Gabor Degre, sportswriters Ernie Clark and Andrew Neff, and former Lifestyle reporter Jessica Bloch.

Bennett took first place in the General News photography category for his memorable shot of a homeless woman in Bangor sitting on a log in a wooded area of the city. Degre won in the Portrait or Profile photo category for his image of an 88-year-old Brewer man flying a model airplane he built.

Clark and Neff won in the Sports Feature writing category for their combined coverage of the 50th anniversary of the New York Giants and Green Bay Packers playing an NFL exhibition game in Bangor in 1959.

Bloch won in the Arts and Entertainment writing category for her feature on artist Phil Schirmer of Blue Hill, a longtime proponent of the rarely used painting medium of egg tempera.

The Bangor Daily News also took one second-place award and five third-place honors.

Taking second in the Photo Story category was BDN photographer Bridget Brown, honored for her images of whales off the coast of Maine.

Third-place awards went to reporter Emily Burnham in the Business and Consumer News writing category for her two-part series looking at the revival of downtown Bangor; reporters Abigail Curtis, Bill Trotter and Judy Harrison in the Continuing Coverage writing category for their coverage of a shooting involving lobstermen on Matinicus Island; Ernie Clark for his Sports Feature on Carlos Baeza, manager of the Camden Hills Regional High School boys basketball team; and graphics director Eric Zelz and page designer Becky Bowden in the Page 1 Design category for their work with text and images detailing an old plane wreck on a mountain in Baxter State Park.

The Bangor Daily News website was named third-best in New England, behind first-place winner The Cape Cod Times and second-place honoree The Portland Press Herald.

For complete results, see related list.

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