White supremacists recruit in Bucksport

A well-used utility pole ia seen Monday, May 10, 2010 outside the post office in Bucksport where a flyer, trying to recruit youths to join a white supremacy group, was posted to and reported to authorities last month. The flyer was one of two in downtown Bucksport which police are investigating. BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN
BDN
A well-used utility pole ia seen Monday, May 10, 2010 outside the post office in Bucksport where a flyer, trying to recruit youths to join a white supremacy group, was posted to and reported to authorities last month. The flyer was one of two in downtown Bucksport which police are investigating. BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN
Posted May 10, 2010, at 9:13 p.m.
Last modified Jan. 30, 2011, at 11:44 a.m.
A copy of the flyer for the Bucksport Bay White Youth Pride Party is seen Monday, May 10, 2010. Two of these flyers were found in downtown Bucksport and reported to authorities last month. They are currently under investigation. BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN
BDN
A copy of the flyer for the Bucksport Bay White Youth Pride Party is seen Monday, May 10, 2010. Two of these flyers were found in downtown Bucksport and reported to authorities last month. They are currently under investigation. BANGOR DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY BRIDGET BROWN

BUCKSPORT, Maine — A fledgling, self-proclaimed hate group is trying to recruit area young people to join its white supremacy effort.

The Bucksport Bay White Youth Pride Party in recent weeks has distributed fliers inviting young people between the ages of 15 and 35 to join. The fliers, which contain what appear to be “cut and paste” images of a swastika and a Nazi flag, have been placed in the downtown area since April 21.

“This is the beginning of a group to support white growth and to remove the illegal colored scum from america, starting here!” the flier states. “This organization has a mission to educate and spread a legal seed of hatred across the Penobscot river area, and eventually the entire state.”

It also notes that the goal of the organization is simple: “To reclaim U.S.A. soil to the white race and as a white nation only. We move to impress and empower Maine’s white youth through knowledge and public expression.”

The flier says the organization is small but is expected to expand rapidly.

“We have a well-structured growth plan that will eventually result in concerts, legal movement, and mostly being able to wear patches and other gear showing white pride in public, without fear of discrimination,” it states.

One of the organizers of the group, identifying himself only as “Proprietor Mutt,” said the organization started several years ago in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Replying by telephone to an e-mail inquiry sent to an address on the flier, bbwypp@gmail.com, a man calling himself Proprietor Mutt said he brought the idea with him when he moved from Utah to Maine. He said other organizers would be moving from out of state soon.

“This is a nationalist movement,” he said. “It is a hate group.”

He stressed, however, that this is a nonviolent group.

“We want to make sure that the people who join us stay as far away from the criminalistic activities that people associate with things like this,” he said.

He added that those who seek violence should look to other established white supremacist organizations.

The organization has about 40 members now, according to Proprietor Mutt, and is reaching out to youth in an effort to solve problems such as “rape and homicide statistics that are vastly associated with people of color and the gross abuses of the welfare and tax systems.”

Making America a “whites only” nation would solve those types of problems, he said.

The language of nonviolence is typical of these types of hate groups, according to Tom Harnett, Maine’s assistant attorney general in charge of civil rights education and enforcement. They are careful to use clear language that they do not advocate violence, Harnett said.

Although the hate language may be reprehensible, Harnett said, it is “speech” and is protected as long as it doesn’t promote violence or property damage.

Bucksport Police Chief Sean Geagan said the first pamphlets appeared at the Bucksport post office on April 21 and have turned up at a few other locations in the downtown Bucksport area. He added that the effort does not appear to be widespread.

“We haven’t seen a lot of activity,” Geagan said Monday. “There was supposed to be an event last weekend. We were keeping an eye out, but it never happened.”

The age of the targeted recruitment group — 15 to 35, according to the flier — falls within high school age, but there does not appear to be any recruiting activity in the local schools.

Jim Boothby, superintendent of schools for RSU 25, said Monday that although he knew about the fliers, he had no knowledge of any students being involved. He said he had checked with administrators who reported they were not aware of any activity in the schools.

Harnett said his office will look at the organization more closely once the local police have completed their investigation.

“We’ll look at it to see if it crosses the line,” he said.

He added that this is something the Attorney General’s Office will follow very closely to make sure that it does not rise to the level of a crime.

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