Boy arrested in fire at 1800s Maine textile mill

File - Flames shoot from the windows at the Cowan Mill at Island Point in downtown Lewiston, Maine in this July 16, 2009 file photo. The fire had fullyt engulfed the building by the time fire crews got to the scene around 4 p.m. A 13-year-old boy was arrested Thursday Oct. 8, 2009 in connection with the fire that destroyed the historic textile mill in Maine's second-largest city. (AP Photo/Justin Pelletier - Sun Journal, File)
AP
File - Flames shoot from the windows at the Cowan Mill at Island Point in downtown Lewiston, Maine in this July 16, 2009 file photo. The fire had fullyt engulfed the building by the time fire crews got to the scene around 4 p.m. A 13-year-old boy was arrested Thursday Oct. 8, 2009 in connection with the fire that destroyed the historic textile mill in Maine's second-largest city. (AP Photo/Justin Pelletier - Sun Journal, File)
Flames shoot from the windows at the Cowan Mill at Island Point in downtown Lewiston, Maine on Wednesday, July 15, 2009. The fire had fully engulfed the building by the time fire crews got to the scene around 4. (AP Photo/Justin Pelletier, Sun Journal)
AP
Flames shoot from the windows at the Cowan Mill at Island Point in downtown Lewiston, Maine on Wednesday, July 15, 2009. The fire had fully engulfed the building by the time fire crews got to the scene around 4. (AP Photo/Justin Pelletier, Sun Journal)
Posted Oct. 09, 2009, at 9:44 a.m.

LEWISTON, Maine — A 13-year-old boy has been arrested and charged with arson in connection with a fire that destroyed a historic textile mill overlooking a waterfall in Maine’s second-largest city.

Flames shot through the windows and licked through the roof of the vacant 60,000-square-foot Cowan Mill in Lewiston in July. Investigators ruled the fire an arson.

The state fire marshal’s office on Thursday night arrested a local boy, who was being held at a youth correctional facility.

The mill was built in 1850 and was on the National Historic Register. It overlooked the Great Falls on the Androscoggin River, which runs through Maine and New Hampshire.

The destruction of the mill ended stalled efforts to rehabilitate it but may make the waterfront property more appealing to developers.

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