Stop babying NFL quarterbacks

Posted Sept. 15, 2009, at 11:02 p.m.

Wheeling around the keyboard waiting for the next caution flag to get a wedge adjustment for my keyboard …

It’s just a matter of time before NFL quarterbacks are outfitted with flags around their waists and the only way they can be tackled is if a flag is pulled out by an opponent.

The New England Patriots-Buffalo Bills game on Monday night proved that the NFL is going to take every precaution to protect quarterbacks.

And leave pass-rushers virtually helpless and wondering what they can and can’t do.

It’s tough enough for them to fight their way past 300-pound offensive linemen, double-teams and blocking backs to get to the quarterback.

According to NFL rules, quarterbacks can only be sacked above the knees and below the neck.

I understand the rationale but it has gotten out of hand. It’s a tough game and they have to stop babying the quarterbacks.

The hit that ended Tom Brady’s season last year wasn’t malicious. Kansas City Chiefs safety Bernard Pollard was doing his job. He was lying on the ground, reaching for Brady to try to prevent him from throwing a pass.

Because of the hit, they have clarified a rule by stating that defenders who are on the ground but who haven’t been blocked or fouled directly cannot lunge or dive at a quarterback’s legs.

It was a freak injury.

Brady has been hit like that hundreds of times without being hurt.

New England’s Vince Wilfork was called for roughing the passer when he tackled Buffalo quarterback Trent Edwards around the knees and thighs last night.

What’s he supposed to do?

There was nothing dangerous about the hit.

Later in the game, the Pats’ Adalius Thomas picked Green up and threw him to the ground and was assessed a roughing-the-passer penalty.

If you have a quarterback wrapped up and the whistle hasn’t blown, the play is still alive and the quarterback can still free himself and throw the ball.

Was Thomas expected just to hold him until the whistle blew?

Thomas didn’t pile-drive him, head-first, into the turf …

The Chase for the Sprint Cup points championship begins at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on Sunday.

Keep an eye on former Formula One driver; CART points champion and Indy 500 winner Juan Pablo Montoya, who is in his third season as a full-time Sprint Cup driver.

He had 12 top-10 finishes in 26 races and has run consistently in the top 10 of late.

He has controlled his temper and learned how to be a points racer. Instead of trying to force his way to the front and spinning out, he has kept his composure and rung up strong finishes.

Not having a road course in the final 10 races will hurt his chances but he has improved dramatically on the other types of tracks and won’t have any pressure on him since he’s a first-time Chase racer …

My thoughts and prayers go out to the family and friends of orthopedist and surgeon Dr. John West III, who was one of the team physicians for the University of Maine’s athletic teams.

West died last week.

A top-notch surgeon with an adventurous zest for life that including skiing and spending time on Moosehead Lake, West was a quality individual who was always pleasant.

He had tremendous passion for his family, his patients, the state of Maine and the University of Maine’s athletic teams.

He will be missed.

SEE COMMENTS →

View stories by school

ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business
ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business

Similar Articles

More in Sports