Interior Monologues

1. &quotMt. Chase," David Little 2006. Oil on canvas, 18-by-24. Little lives Portland but has painted in locations all over northern Penobscot and southern Aroostook counties. He was introduced to this spot, on Happy Corner Road in Patten, by fellow artist Chris Huntington, whose work also appears in &quotUpcountry." This is a view of the mountain looking north. &quotOne thing that's really beautiful is the difference in looking at Mount Chase from Patten and then from the Shin Pond side," Little said. &quotI like the open space [in this view], and the way the mountain appears."
Directions: Traveling north on Route 11, Happy Corner Road is a left turn. To hike Mount Chase, travel Route 11 about 6.2 miles north of the intersection of Routes 11 and 159 in Patten. Turn left on Mountain Road, which is a rough private road, and travel 2.1 miles to a parking area. Rated a moderate hike.
1. "Mt. Chase," David Little 2006. Oil on canvas, 18-by-24. Little lives Portland but has painted in locations all over northern Penobscot and southern Aroostook counties. He was introduced to this spot, on Happy Corner Road in Patten, by fellow artist Chris Huntington, whose work also appears in "Upcountry." This is a view of the mountain looking north. "One thing that's really beautiful is the difference in looking at Mount Chase from Patten and then from the Shin Pond side," Little said. "I like the open space [in this view], and the way the mountain appears." Directions: Traveling north on Route 11, Happy Corner Road is a left turn. To hike Mount Chase, travel Route 11 about 6.2 miles north of the intersection of Routes 11 and 159 in Patten. Turn left on Mountain Road, which is a rough private road, and travel 2.1 miles to a parking area. Rated a moderate hike.
Posted Oct. 10, 2008, at 10:38 p.m.
5. &quotAirline Hills," Beth Lambert 2008. Oil on board, 24-by-24. Mariaville resident Lambert likes to paint in the area around the Airline Road because, well, it hasn't yet been overpainted and there are views of Acadia National Park from the road. Lambert usually makes a crayon sketch in the open and then takes it back to her studio to be painted. &quotPeople love land, even though we have that beautiful coast, and even though many people get no farther than the coast," said Lambert, who does do coastal paintings. &quotI think landscapes of the rolling hills and skies and colors are so satisifying."
Directions: As most Mainers know, the Airline is the common name for the section of Route 9 from Brewer to the Calais area. Most sections of the road have beautiful views, and there's a scenic view turnout near the Whalesback, an esker in Aurora.
5. "Airline Hills," Beth Lambert 2008. Oil on board, 24-by-24. Mariaville resident Lambert likes to paint in the area around the Airline Road because, well, it hasn't yet been overpainted and there are views of Acadia National Park from the road. Lambert usually makes a crayon sketch in the open and then takes it back to her studio to be painted. "People love land, even though we have that beautiful coast, and even though many people get no farther than the coast," said Lambert, who does do coastal paintings. "I think landscapes of the rolling hills and skies and colors are so satisifying." Directions: As most Mainers know, the Airline is the common name for the section of Route 9 from Brewer to the Calais area. Most sections of the road have beautiful views, and there's a scenic view turnout near the Whalesback, an esker in Aurora.
2. &quotBorestone, Looking North in October," Nina Jerome 2007. Oil on canvas, 48-by-72. Jerome of Bangor has made just four visits to Borestone, but she has been able to get something different from each trip. Two of those trips have been through the Maine Audubon Society, which maintains the mountain as a sanctuary. This painting came out of photographs and her own memory of her first hike up the mountain in late October 2006. &quotIt's not just one thing," she said of her interest in the area. &quotIt's the woods, it's the ponds, it's the hike up Borestone, it's the hike up Peregrine Trail. Each one provides a really distinct experience. What I've learned is I can't go up there with expectations."
Directions: Drive north on Route 15 half a mile from Monson. Turn right on Elliotsville Road. Drive 7.3 miles to Big Wilson Stream, cross the bridge and turn left. Cross the railroad tracks and the trailhead will be on the right. Rated a moderate hike.
2. "Borestone, Looking North in October," Nina Jerome 2007. Oil on canvas, 48-by-72. Jerome of Bangor has made just four visits to Borestone, but she has been able to get something different from each trip. Two of those trips have been through the Maine Audubon Society, which maintains the mountain as a sanctuary. This painting came out of photographs and her own memory of her first hike up the mountain in late October 2006. "It's not just one thing," she said of her interest in the area. "It's the woods, it's the ponds, it's the hike up Borestone, it's the hike up Peregrine Trail. Each one provides a really distinct experience. What I've learned is I can't go up there with expectations." Directions: Drive north on Route 15 half a mile from Monson. Turn right on Elliotsville Road. Drive 7.3 miles to Big Wilson Stream, cross the bridge and turn left. Cross the railroad tracks and the trailhead will be on the right. Rated a moderate hike.
3. &quotBodfish Valley," Alan Bray 2001. Casein on panel, 36-by-18. Bray grew up in Monson and lives in Sangerville, but the local landscape is never mundane for him. Woodcutting operations are constantly changing the scenery, which is how Bray found this view of the valley between Borestone and Barren mountains. This painting came from sketches he made in a clear-cut off Greenville Road. "[The clear-cut] opened up a view of the valley you'd never seen before," he said. &quotI love the geometry of agriculture, where man-made things meet the natural world. That's something I'm very drawn to."
Directions: Bray recommends heading to Borestone Mountain (see directions, below, in Jerome?s painting). Drive past the trailhead parking lot and follow the road, which takes you along the eastern hump of Borestone and into the valley.
3. "Bodfish Valley," Alan Bray 2001. Casein on panel, 36-by-18. Bray grew up in Monson and lives in Sangerville, but the local landscape is never mundane for him. Woodcutting operations are constantly changing the scenery, which is how Bray found this view of the valley between Borestone and Barren mountains. This painting came from sketches he made in a clear-cut off Greenville Road. "[The clear-cut] opened up a view of the valley you'd never seen before," he said. "I love the geometry of agriculture, where man-made things meet the natural world. That's something I'm very drawn to." Directions: Bray recommends heading to Borestone Mountain (see directions, below, in Jerome?s painting). Drive past the trailhead parking lot and follow the road, which takes you along the eastern hump of Borestone and into the valley.
4. &quotFall Fire at Rocky Pond," Michael Vermette 2008. Watercolor, 20-by-26. Vermette, who lives on Indian Island, has 20 years of experience painting the ponds and lakes around Mount Katahdin. He was inspired to go to Katahdin by the work of 20th century artist James Fitzgerald, who lived on Monhegan Island and traveled north to paint the mountain. &quotI love [the spot], because you have car-sized boulders that take on the shape of the mountain and repeat themselves in the water," Vermette said. &quotThis particular painting has a huge bush that was just aglow, like fire, with leaves."
Directions: Vermette's instructions are to start at Avalanche Field, on Roaring Brook Road in Baxter State Park, and hike about 3.5 miles to Katahdin Lake Wilderness Camps, which are privately owned. Follow Katahdin Brook to Rocky Pond, which is the next pond down. Vermette paddles that stretch in a canoe, but he said you can hike to Rocky Pond, too.
4. "Fall Fire at Rocky Pond," Michael Vermette 2008. Watercolor, 20-by-26. Vermette, who lives on Indian Island, has 20 years of experience painting the ponds and lakes around Mount Katahdin. He was inspired to go to Katahdin by the work of 20th century artist James Fitzgerald, who lived on Monhegan Island and traveled north to paint the mountain. "I love [the spot], because you have car-sized boulders that take on the shape of the mountain and repeat themselves in the water," Vermette said. "This particular painting has a huge bush that was just aglow, like fire, with leaves." Directions: Vermette's instructions are to start at Avalanche Field, on Roaring Brook Road in Baxter State Park, and hike about 3.5 miles to Katahdin Lake Wilderness Camps, which are privately owned. Follow Katahdin Brook to Rocky Pond, which is the next pond down. Vermette paddles that stretch in a canoe, but he said you can hike to Rocky Pond, too.

The trees outside Courthouse Gallery Fine Arts in Ellsworth have just started to turn, but inside Karen and Michael Wilkes’ gallery, fall colors are in full view. Their current show,“Upcountry: A Spectacular Muse,” shows off the fiery fall beauty of interior Maine in more than 70 paintings from 13 painters. Anyone with a hankering to get out of the house this fall can get to these places, too. Here is a selection of paintings from the show, with a statement from the artist and directions to these spectacular sights. Drive, hike, or create some art of your own. Rainy day? See the exhibit for yourself at the gallery at 6 Court St., Ellsworth. Call 667-6611 for more information.

Hiking directions, except where noted, and ratings are from the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Maine Mountain Guide, 9th edition.

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