CAROLINE D. GENTILE

Posted Sept. 25, 2008, at 11:20 p.m.

CAROLINE D. GENTILE PRESQUE ISLE – Caroline D. Gentile, 84, passed away peacefully Friday, Sept. 19, 2008, at her home. Caroline was born Jan. 24, 1924, in Newton, Mass., the daughter of Gerardo and Donata Bucchelli Gentile. She graduated from Newton High School and went on to earn a bachelor’s degree from Sargent College, a master’s from New York University, and completed further graduate studies at the University of Wisconsin and Columbia University. In 1996, in honor of her 50th year of teaching at the University of Maine at Presque Isle, she was awarded an honorary doctorate. In 1946, Dr. Clifford O.T. Wieden hired Miss Gentile to teach at the then Aroostook State Normal School, and build its Health, Physical Education and Recreation Program – HPER. Through her extraordinary long range planning abilities and her 54 years as a classroom teacher, she created a physical education program that has served the county, the state and the regions beyond. Throughout the years, the program has gained a reputation for excellence around New England. Her concern for the health of her profession led her to serve in leadership capacities around the state. She was president of the Maine District in HPER; president of Maine Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance; a member of the Governor’s Advisory Commission on HPER; a member of state HPER Curriculum Committee; the American Association of HPER Publications Director for Maine; a member of state and national boards on HPER; one of the organizers of Maine Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women; and served on the Sunday Telegram’s 22 member panel asked to select and rank the top 20 events of the century. While dedicated to her discipline, Miss Gentile also contributed immensely to the creation of a strong and thriving university through her many leadership roles on campus and service on numerous committees. She served as chair of the Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation for 20 years. She twice was president of the University Senate, twice president of AFUM, the faculty union, and was one of its founding members. For more than 50 years, she orchestrated commencement every year, paying strict attention to protocol and tradition. She taught thousands of students, served on hundreds of committees, and influenced many a faculty member. But her work extended beyond the campus

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